Los zetas killings


  • Mexican drug cartel suspected after 29 decapitated in Guatemala
  • Zeta Cartel Killings
  • Mexican cartel murders bride at altar during her own wedding, kidnaps groom
  • Disturbing video shows Mexican cartel lining up rivals for mass execution
  • Mexican hitman who killed 30 people reveals gruesome reality of cartel violence
  • Mexican drug cartel suspected after 29 decapitated in Guatemala

    A Mexican soldier stands guard near the place where forensic experts investigate a common grave in Acapulco, Mexico. Just before the interview begins, he puts the bag aside, and slips on the ski mask. He sits in a plastic armchair. Story continues below advertisement There are many reasons people are disappeared, the killer says. It may be for belonging to a rival gang, or for giving information to one. If a person is considered a security risk for any reason, he may be disappeared.

    Some are kidnapped for ransom, though he says he does not do this. Each kidnapping starts with locating the target. If he is armed, it requires more manpower. He describes three methods: beatings; waterboarding, or simulated drownings in which a cloth is tied around the mouth and nose, and water is poured over it; and electric shocks to the testicles, tongue and the soles of the feet.

    He has no training in torture. He learned it all by practice, he says. Once he gets it, he kills them. By the official count, 26, Mexicans have been reported missing nationwide since , just over 1, of those from Guerrero. But human rights officials and the experience of families from the Iguala area indicate that most people are too afraid to report kidnappings, particularly in areas where police, municipal and state officials are believed to be operating in tandem with the cartels.

    The official tally has just 24 missing from the Costa Grande area, where the killer says he has been involved in the killings of 30 people.

    The killer has a grade-school education. He wanted to continue studying, but when he was a child there was no middle school in his town. Although he would like to have a family, he knows his future is uncertain. Tweet This Click to share quote on Twitter: "It's not a pretty life," he says. Life in an area torn by drug disputes is rarely pretty. Story continues below advertisement Besides running drugs, some Mexican cartels operate extortion rackets and control human trafficking to the United States.

    Where needed, they buy off politicians and police forces to make sure nothing gets in the way of business. When necessary, they kill those who fail to cooperate. The violence spikes when cartels are fighting each other for control of territory, or when the military launches operations to strike the cartels. Vigilantes face off against cartels In recent years, residents of a number of towns and cities have taken up arms to protect themselves against drug cartels.

    In several cases, authorities have claimed these vigilantes are allied with rival gangs, and pass themselves off as self-defense groups to gain greater legitimacy. Federal authorities told the AP that several drug gangs in Guerrero, including those that operate on the Costa Grande, act as self-defense groups to generate support from local residents.

    On Tuesday, it was reported that two members of Los Zetas were killed and another captured by Guatemalan authorities, following the attacks. Initial police reports said the victims died in a shootout, but investigators later revised their report after gathering evidence at the crime scene. The massacre occurred early Sunday and the victims were beheaded by the gunmen, the PNC said.

    Dozens of soldiers were sent to the border with Mexico, located about kilometers 62 miles from Los Cocos, army spokesman Col. Rony Urizar told Efe. Los Cocos is in Peten, a province covered by dense jungles that is used by international drug traffickers to smuggle narcotics from South America into Mexico.

    Leon Lara was murdered Saturday on the outskirts of Flores, another city in Peten. He was the brother of Juan Jose Leon, a Guatemalan drug trafficker who operated in the eastern region of the country and was murdered along with 10 other people by Zetas gunmen in March PNC drug enforcement agents and prosecutors are at Los Cocos to gather evidence for the investigation and try to determine the motive for the massacre.

    Los Zetas has been blamed for several massacres in Mexico, including the killings last August of 72 migrants, the majority of them from Latin America, at a ranch outside San Fernando, a city in the northeastern state of Tamaulipas.

    The cartel is also suspected of being behind the killings of people whose remains were found in 40 mass graves in Tamaulipas in the past few weeks. Los Zetas has been battling rivals in several states for control of smuggling routes into the United States. After about a decade on the payroll of the Gulf cartel, Los Zetas went into the drug business on their own account and now control several lucrative territories.

    Los Zetas, in addition to trafficking drugs, is also involved in kidnappings, armed robberies and extortion rackets. The ministry also repeated its commitment to fighting narco-trafficking in the region.

    He learned it all by practice, he says. Once he gets it, he kills them. By the official count, 26, Mexicans have been reported missing nationwide sincejust over 1, of those from Guerrero.

    Zeta Cartel Killings

    But human rights officials and the experience of families from the Iguala area indicate that most people are too afraid to report kidnappings, particularly in areas where police, municipal and state officials are believed to be operating in tandem with the cartels. The official tally has just 24 missing from the Costa Grande area, where the killer says he has been involved in the killings of 30 people.

    The killer has a grade-school education. He wanted to continue studying, but when he was a child there was no middle school in his town. Although he would like to have a family, he knows his future is uncertain. Tweet This Click to share quote on Twitter: "It's not a pretty life," he says. The Zetas' logistical sophistication and military training helped catapult the group to power. They became known for their use state-of-the-art weapons and communications technology, and for employing military-like discipline in planning operations and gathering intelligence.

    Unlike other cartels, the Zetas did not buy alliances so much as terrorize their enemies. They tortured victims, strung up bodies, and slaughtered indiscriminately, as was brutally illustrated in Augustwhen the Zetas killed 72 migrants and dumped their bodies in a hole in Tamaulipas.

    Mexican cartel murders bride at altar during her own wedding, kidnaps groom

    The Zetas preferred to take military-style control of territory, holding it through sheer force and exploiting its criminal opportunities. Although their military training was diluted over time, their brutality was not.

    Rival cartels struggling against the Zetas began to adopt some of their tactics, further ramping up violence in the country.

    Bythe Zetas had established a presence in Mexican municipalities, over twice as many as their nearest rivals. They had also moved into Guatemala, seizing strategic drug trafficking territories with their trademark violence. However, they were in nearly constant war with the Gulf Cartel over control of the key border state of Tamaulipas, especially the cities of Matamoros, Reynosa and Nuevo Laredo, as well as the key economic hub of Monterrey.

    Disturbing video shows Mexican cartel lining up rivals for mass execution

    The Zetas also became embroiled in numerous other cartel wars across the country, including taking on the might of the Sinaloa Cartel. During this time, the Zetas built up a network of international drug trafficking contacts, stretching through Central America to Colombia, and with reported connections in Venezuela, Europe, the United States and West Africa.

    However, the territorial control of each local faction also allowed them to take their share from any other criminal activity taking place in their "plaza," and the Zetas also began to profit from everything from kidnapping migrants to pirating DVDs. The motorway from which the buses were stopped at a fake military checkpoint became known as the "Highway of Death" to locals.

    Starting inthe Zetas heavily fragmented into independent localised factions, no longer capable of large-scale international drug trafficking. The horrific mass killing at a bar in Coatzacoalcos this week took place in a Zeta-controlled area. Its origins can be traced back to Juan Garcia Abrego's alliance with Colombian cartels to smuggle drugs into the US back in the s. When Garcia Abrego was arrested inthe group was making billions every year. The Gulf Cartel are known for their extremely high number of kidnappings — 68 victims were found in a Gulf Cartel safehouse in Reynosa in They even used sports stars to carry out their kidnappings, including FC Monterrey star Omar Ortiz and lucha libre wrestler Lazaro Gurralo.

    But it was Garcia Abrego's successor, Osiel Gardenas Guillen, who cemented the Gulf Cartel's violent reputation by recruiting the 31 special forces deserters to do his bidding.

    When those soldiers broke to form the Zetas, the Gulf Cartel became locked in its bloodiest ever conflict — this time against a rival of its own creation.

    Mexican hitman who killed 30 people reveals gruesome reality of cartel violence

    The violence has raged across at least five Mexican cities and even spilled into America when two Zetas were killed by Gulf Cartel members in Texas in Holiday from Hell 17 17 Armed cops patrol the beaches of Cancun after recent cartel violence in the regionCredit: James Breeden Tourist hotspots are being swallowed up by the rising tide of cartel bloodshed - including along the Carribean coast - whereBrits sun themselves every year.

    Increasingly, this stretch of paradise - which includes the white sandy beaches of Cancun, Playa del Carmen and Tulum — is blighted by cartels battling for power and territory.

    In Cancun alone, murder has exploded in the last two years from in to in Something has changed. Is Mexico safe for tourists? Drug-related violence in Mexico has increased massively in recent years with murders now commonplace.

    Morgues even closed down in the Tvr state of Guerrero after they were inundated with gangland victims. Many fatalities are those killed in turf wars between the different gangs competing for trafficking routes into the US. The Foreign Office warns that while the government has made efforts to protect popular tourist destinations, including Playa del Carmen, there has been a number of shooting incidents in the areas.


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