Distance formula maze


  • 9 Ways to Make Teaching the Distance Formula Awesome
  • Python Learning Project: Dijkstra, OpenCV, and UI Algorithm (Part 1)
  • algebra distance between two points Algebra
  • Count number of ways to reach destination in a Maze
  • Share0 Disclaimer: The following tutorial requires Conditional Formatting which is a feature of Excel and greater. If you are using an older version of Excel, please note that formatting will not work correctly for you. Many thanks to Cary for inviting me to write a few tutorials for his series. If you have not read either of these posts, I strongly suggest you read them before moving forward.

    This will be similar to the illuminated pathway featured in the bottom-right of the spreadsheet maze shown below. The tile set is the exhaustive set of all possible tiles to be displayed on your map. A tile is a region, usually larger than a square, that contains specific information about the the terrain encoded as a number.

    This may sound complicated but our example really only includes two key pieces of information: if a square contains a 1, then the square represents a wall; if it contains a 0, it represents an open pathway. Well, that sounds pretty easy, right? If each cell is a square, we can combine several squares to make a tile.

    I then delete the zeros because Excel treats an empty cell as a zero. As I began developing the map, I realized I needed more. So try your best to define all the necessary tiles before moving forward but always remember you can add more later if need be.

    The numbers to the left of each tile are really important. They act as a key, or a unique identifier, for each tile. So now comes the incredibly monotonous task of naming each of these tiles.

    Now keep doing this until you have no more tiles left to name. If you misspell a name or give it the wrong key, you can fix or delete the name by using the Name Manager on the Format tab.

    Make sense? Just imagine how many nested IFs this would have required! Remember that each tile is comprised of a range of cells. Good question! The INDEX formula takes a range or an array in its first parameter, and a row and column indices in its second and third.

    Your addresses may be different from my above W40,X39 , so take care to ensure your formula works. Copy it, and then paste another to the right of it. Keep pasting until you have 5 sets of tiles. This time, select the row headers but not the column headers. OK, so now you should have a 5 by 5 tile grid all with the same tiles.

    Mapping your tiles What we need now is a way to easily map a specific tile to a specific area on the grid. So, in a space next to your tile grid, create a new table that looks like this: Note the five-by-five grid above is similar to the five-by-five set of tiles in the larger grid. The key you enter into the table above defines what tile will appear in the larger map.

    The problem is that we must keep track of two indices. We need to keep track of the the rows and columns inside of each tile and we must also keep track of the overall location of the tile. For example, the region that intersects with both series of 1s in the rows and columns of this square grid corresponds to the first row and first column of the smaller tile map we created a moment earlier. Try your hand at the formula above. Now drag down and across to copy and paste the formula to the rest of the large grid.

    Afterward, pick a few cells on your larger map at random and press F2. Make sure the correct references are being pulled. Notice how they are update immediately on the larger map.

    Remember you can consult your tile set as legend to find the right number for the desired tile. Then name the corresponding cells Calculations. Top and Calculations. Create a larger table a few cells away from the placeholder. First, create the column header by initiating a consecutive series from 1 to Then do the same for row headers.

    See the table below as a guide. Pay attention to setting the correct row and column references. Use conditional formatting like we did earlier in the tutorial to turn the 1s black. For now, leave the zeros as they are. Note that an entry point to our map appears at the intersection of the second row and the first column. So enter the number 2 in the space next to the Top label.

    Enter a 1 next to the Left label. We want our player to appear at the intersection of the coordinates given by Top and Left.

    There are a couple of ways we can do that. The easiest way is to employ an IF formula. But for a much larger map, the IF formula is going to slow us down. Now drag right and down ensuring the correct references are being used.

    So when the AND evaluates to true, it will be subtracted from either one or zero. If our player is correctly on a path in our map, it will show up as a —1. Now select the entire data region. Click on the small arrow in the Numbers group from on the Format tab. Select Custom for the category, then paste in the following code and press OK. What this will do is if the value is -1 then the cell will have a smiley face visible without changing the data or formula.

    Now we need to code some movement and controls. Open the Visual Basic Editor and double-click the sheet object in the Project Explorer in the upper left corresponding to the sheet were were just looking at. In an ideal world, you would not use explicit numbers in your code.

    Find the Dimensions of a Cuboid with given information. Ratio Practice using Direct Proportion, leverage on problem-solving concepts learnt previously to solve word problems between two ratios e. Area Finding the Area of a Rectangle and a Square. Grade 6 We break down the daunting topic of Algebra into simple ideas.

    Circles Find Area, Circumference of a Circle, with revision on word problems. Speed Study relationships between Speed and Time, Speed and Distance, Distance between 2 Points, practise understanding with problems on Time Taken, Overtaking, Difference between Average Speeds with the Distance-Speed-Time triangle, revision on word problems involving increasing and decreasing distance between 2 objects.

    Fractions Expression in simplest form, Comparing and Ordering, Addition and Subtraction of related fractions. Scales Study on Maps and Scales. Grade 7 Detailed, step-by-step explanations taking you through concepts of variables and unknowns in Algebra and Geometry. Imparting useful tips and techniques to help your child overcome more algebraic problems. Factorisation Learn complex problem-solving skills like Removing Common Factor, form expressions by Grouping. Standard form An introduction to what a Standard Form is.

    Through animated representation of angles and its properties, your child develops a deep sense of imagery, which is useful when dealing with properties of a circle, modelling and scale drawings. Angles Learn about Interior Angles and their applications.

    Probability Learning to work out Probability Calculations. Inequalities Learn about Inequalities, work on adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing terms. Area Working on more shapes like Polygons and Parallelograms, solve problem sums on area of Polygon. Function An introduction to Properties of a Function and its application. Coordinates Practise question on Cartisean Coordinates Planes. Power-packed programmes.

    Kahoot has a variety of teacher created games, or you can create your own. In my class we have a running commentary about who is a better basketball player, Steph Curry or Kyrie Irving. The other day when we played Kahoot, one of the students signed in as Kyrie and I knew who it was.

    I am on team Curry so I gave him a hard time as we played. He was at the top of the game board most of the game. I encouraged everyone to try and beat him. He was determined to win. It all came down to the last question, and he got it wrong.

    He was beating himself up for making the mental mistake right at the end of the game, but apparently he was far enough ahead to still win. This rivalry within our math review game added a lot of fun to class and everyone felt like they were a part of it. Illustrative Mathematics Illustrative Mathematics is a great place to find challenge questions and performance tasks.

    This Finding the Distance Between Two Points task in particular is amazing because it gets kids thinking about the Pythagorean Theorem, the distance formula, and graphing. They have to make a square around the triangle and use the Pythagorean Theorem 3 times.

    Also, this task reinforces the derivation of the distance formula. Discovering the Distance Formula We always do a discovery activity before any notes.

    This way students start off building their background and they can make meaning of the concept before they receive information from the teacher. What I mean is that my students, most of whom struggle extensively in math, really got the distance formula with this activity.

    This activity guides students toward deriving the distance formula. They have to struggle, but in the end they know where the formula comes from.

    It takes their understanding to the next level. What a stark contrast to other years. This discovery activity can really get all learners to own the distance formula. Anticipatory Set or Hooks I love having a hook at the beginning of the lesson. Lessons always run smoother when students get hooked into it first. Anticipatory sets also serve as a way to review on a daily basis and build background.

    Doodle notes are a great review of the key terms and ideas of a concept. The twist is that students can color code it themselves to help make another mental connection for the concept.

    For the specific one I used I cut off the midpoint formula. To use these doodle notes for the anticipatory set, I placed the answer key on the doc cam and had the students fill-in as much as they could. When they got stuck they had the answer key to refer to. They also had the chance to decide what and how they wanted to color it. It was a little long for a hook, but I really liked how engaged the kids were working on it.

    Shmoop Video to Illustrate the Distance Formula This series of videos from Shmoop uses quirkiness and silliness to engage students in math.

    9 Ways to Make Teaching the Distance Formula Awesome

    This particular video lasts for It riffs off of Lord of the Rings and tells a story of trying to return the One Donut of Power to its rightful place. Students like it because it differs from the videos that just have a person talking about a list of steps. In this video we looked for the distance formula. I gave them a small list of questions to answer while they watched. The combination of a compelling video and a purpose to watch clear idea of what they are looking for makes this a great way to start a lesson.

    Python Learning Project: Dijkstra, OpenCV, and UI Algorithm (Part 1)

    Modeling and Teaching After the discovery lab there we spend time taking notes and doing problems together. This can take on many forms. If you are using an older version of Excel, please note that formatting will not work correctly for you. Many thanks to Cary for inviting me to write a few tutorials for his series.

    If you have not read either of these posts, I strongly suggest you read them before moving forward. This will be similar to the illuminated pathway featured in the bottom-right of the spreadsheet maze shown below.

    The tile set is the exhaustive set of all possible tiles to be displayed on your map. A tile is a region, usually larger than a square, that contains specific information about the the terrain encoded as a number. This may sound complicated but our example really only includes two key pieces of information: if a square contains a 1, then the square represents a wall; if it contains a 0, it represents an open pathway.

    Well, that sounds pretty easy, right? If each cell is a square, we can combine several squares to make a tile. I then delete the zeros because Excel treats an empty cell as a zero. As I began developing the map, I realized I needed more.

    algebra distance between two points Algebra

    So try your best to define all the necessary tiles before moving forward but always remember you can add more later if need be. The numbers to the left of each tile are really important. They act as a key, or a unique identifier, for each tile. So now comes the incredibly monotonous task of naming each of these tiles. Now keep doing this until you have no more tiles left to name.

    If you misspell a name or give it the wrong key, you can fix or delete the name by using the Name Manager on the Format tab. Make sense? Just imagine how many nested IFs this would have required! Remember that each tile is comprised of a range of cells. Good question! The INDEX formula takes a range or an array in its first parameter, and a row and column indices in its second and third. Your addresses may be different from my above W40,X39so take care to ensure your formula works.

    Copy it, and then paste another to the right of it. Keep pasting until you have 5 sets of tiles. This time, select the row headers but not the column headers. OK, so now you should have a 5 by 5 tile grid all with the same tiles. Mapping your tiles What we need now is a way to easily map a specific tile to a specific area on the grid. So, in a space next to your tile grid, create a new table that looks like this: Note the five-by-five grid above is similar to the five-by-five set of tiles in the larger grid.

    Count number of ways to reach destination in a Maze

    The key you enter into the table above defines what tile will appear in the larger map. The problem is that we must keep track of two indices. We need to keep track of the the rows and columns inside of each tile and we must also keep track of the overall location of the tile. For example, the region that intersects with both series of 1s in the rows and columns of this square grid corresponds to the first row and first column of the smaller tile map we created a moment earlier.


    thoughts on “Distance formula maze

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *