Taking a closer look the crucible answer key


  • The Crucible
  • Organisation culture: The crucible of company performance
  • How to Analyse ‘The Crucible’ for the HSC English Common Module
  • What is The Crucible about? The Crucible takes place in a town called Salem where a girl called Abigail and her friends are found dancing in the woods naked, and are accused of witchcraft.

    Abigail points the finger at her friends, taking the blame away from herself. This sets off a series of events which leads to mass hysteria and panic in the town and false accusations against many of its members. John Proctor, who previously had an affair with Abigail, takes a stand against the corrupt court system which is making false and illogical allegations of witchcraft. Proctor himself is inevitably accused, and in response, he agrees to confess to his guilt so that he will not be hanged.

    At the last minute, he changes his mind, choosing to sacrifice his own life, rather than be complicit in a system built on lies. These trials led to the execution of 20 people and the death of five others two infants while in prison. Miller uses these trials in his play as an allegory for McCarthyism. The McCarthy Era was characterised by accusations towards people in the entertainment industry, academicians, and labour-union activists.

    Those accused were often asked to make lists of their friends and colleagues who they believed to be communist. The key ideas include: The conformity of the masses through mass hysteria and mob psychology The importance of the individual and critical thought Corrupt power structures The use of fear to manipulate others Remember that now that you are in Year 12, you want to be identifying key ideas more so than themes.

    Themes are generally one to two words whereas an idea is closer to a thought or sentence. In short, this module is about deepening your understanding of how texts represent the individual and collective human experience.

    This can include examining how texts represent human qualities and emotions associated with, or arising from human experiences. You can read more about Texts and Human Experiences in our guide here! Link 1: Collective human experience of mass hysteria Mass Hysteria The Crucible deals with the collective human experience of mass hysteria.

    This is closely related to the human emotion of fear. Mass hysteria refers to the ways in which a group of people perceive a great threat in society through rumours or fear. In The Crucible, the people of Salem become irrationally afraid of witches in their midst, leading to the false accusations and subsequent executions of a number of people in the town.

    Mob Psychology Mass hysteria is also seen through examples of mob psychology. Mob psychology is a process by which people lose their individuality and their perspectives and beliefs are altered by a crowd.

    This is seen particularly in Act 3 when Abigail convinces the girls in the courtroom that there is a yellow bird above them preparing to attack. We are told all the girls scream and shield their eyes, although the audience can see that the bird is imagined.

    Miller suggests that mass hysteria and mob psychology are dangerous human emotions and experiences because they stifle truth. Link 2: Paradoxical characters The Crucible is full of paradoxical characters, making it easy to discuss anomalies, paradoxes and inconsistencies in human behaviour and motivations.

    A paradoxical character is a character whose actions are seemingly absurd or contradictory. Abigail Abigail is paradoxical as she is both a victim and a perpetrator. We all know that Abigail is a perpetrator, as her lies act as the driving force which leads to all of the false accusations and imprisonments in the town.

    His immorality is highlighted throughout the play through his adultery and poor treatment of Mary Warren. However, in contrast, he becomes the moral exemplar of the text when he chooses to sacrifice himself in order to be truthful and challenge the corrupt theocracy of the court.

    The Townspeople Finally, the behaviours and actions of the paranoid townspeople is self-contradictory in that their self-preservation ultimately endangers them. People in the town of Salem are quick to falsely accuse their neighbours in order to avoid being accused themselves. Link 3: The anomaly of pursuing truth rather than self-preservation John Proctor John Proctor is an anomaly in the town of Salem, in that the natural human response to fear is to act in a way that seems to preserve oneself, even if it endangers society.

    Proctor, instead of conforming to the paranoia of the town, refuses to falsely accuse his neighbours. This culminates at the end of the play, when Proctor has been convinced to falsely sign his name, admitting his own guilt, saving his life, but condemning himself by lying.

    Proctor, at the last minute changes his mind, deciding that telling the truth is more important than saving his own life. Giles A similar situation occurs with Giles, who is stoned to death for choosing to stand up for the truth, rather than conform to mass hysteria and false accusations. These actions by Giles and Proctor can be interpreted by an audience in two ways. Firstly, it might suggest the futility in standing up for what is right, as these actions merely led to the deaths of characters.

    How to Analyse The Crucible in 4 Steps Often students will try to start with their thesis when trying to answer an essay question. Instead, start with your analysis! You need to equip yourself with the knowledge of your text before you can answer anything about it. Heightened emotions: feelings that increase in intensity If you need to brush up on your literary techniques, check out this cheat sheet of literary techniques to help you analyse The Crucible here!

    Did you know the key to good analysis is starting with a technique? You focus on the technique and identify what it reveals about an idea. Good analysis involves using a technique to say something in addition to what the quote says. Bad analysis is using a technique to restate what happened in the quote. So, what do the techniques of synecdoche and heightened emotion reveal about The Crucible in this passage?

    The girls are making a choice to not look and therefore give up their individuality. Heightened emotion Heightened emotion can be used to show how easily humans can be manipulated by emotions into doing what people tell them what to do.

    Mob psychology is what brings everyone together such that they lose their individuality. When one person does something, you go with it within a group out of fear of being different! For example, for The Crucible, you may want to keep all your pieces of evidence that relate to individuality in one table. For more info on what a TEE table is and how to use one to boost your analysis of an HSC text, check out this article here! Step 4: Link to the question Finally, it is important to establish that we do not recommend fully memorising an essay paragraph like this to go into your exam.

    Your analysis, examples and ideas will always change based on the essay question. However, it is helpful to have paragraph plans like this one which you can use to answer an essay question if the ideas fit. In contrast, you could discuss that Proctor has a genuine love for morality. So there you have it guys!

    We can help you master your HSC English text and ace your upcoming HSC English assessments with personalised lessons conducted one-on-one in your home or at our state of the art campus in Hornsby! To find out more and get started with an inspirational HSC English tutor and mentor, get in touch today or give us a ring on ! Brooklyn teaches our English classes at Art of Smart and has over 5 years of experience supporting Year 11 and 12 students throughout their HSC.

    The court questions and accuses Martha Corey of witchcraft. Giles Corey interrupts the court proceedings and declares that Thomas Putnam is "reaching out for land! Corey says that he owns six hundred acres of land, and a large quantity of timber. Corey also states that the court is holding his wife Martha by mistake. Corey tells Danforth that he had asked Hale why Martha read books, but he never accused her of witchcraft. Corey and Francis Nurse state that they both have evidence for the court.

    They have been waiting for three days to present the evidence, but to no avail. Danforth responds that they must file the appropriate paperwork for the court to hear them. Nurse tells Danforth the girls are pretending. The fascination with witchcraft that appeared in Act I, Scene 5 has quickly changed to mass paranoia.

    The townspeople now regard anyone who does not conform exactly to the laws of Salem society as a potential witch. Fear and automatic suspicion replace reason. As the power of the court grows, the people of Salem live in fear.

    Old grudges, dislikes, and minor misdeeds can result in arrest and death — especially if the person offended is one of the children in the town, or someone who seeks more land.

    As the number of arrests increases, the court shows no mercy and refuses to acknowledge the idea that the accusers may have hidden agendas. Not surprisingly, Proctor, Giles Corey, and Francis Nurse are anxious to present their evidence against Abigail and the girls. The court has just condemned Martha Corey and Rebecca Nurse, and, now that Elizabeth is in jail, Abigail has only to wait until Elizabeth's execution for her plan to be complete.

    Proctor will finally be free to remarry, and Abigail can possess him. Proctor senses this and is desperate to prove that Abigail is a fraud. Danforth and Hathorne's participation in the court empowers them. The workings of the court concern them more than the actual individuals participating in the proceedings — whether voluntarily or against their will.

    As a result, when Nurse tells them that the girls have faked the entire witchcraft incident, the judges regard him as a dangerous individual. He casts doubt on the court, its proceedings, and, by extension, Danforth and Hathorne.

    Glossary daft insane; crazy is closer to mad or crazy. Here, the word describes Giles Corey's attempt to disrupt the court.

    The Crucible

    It was on a mission and it succeeded by driving innovation or performance. Why culture So why is culture antecedent to all other theories of success? After all, there are concepts like strategy, innovation, people, and processes, not to mention theories like core competence, positioning, or segmentation.

    The answer is that culture is the crucible for all of the above. It is the DNA of an organisation - its foundational building block. Any defect in the DNA cannot be overcome by superficial treatment. When the building block is weak, then no matter what reinforcements are applied externally, the structure will be weak as well.

    Organisation culture: The crucible of company performance

    Just like electricity that makes a machine into a refrigerator and also a room hot from a room heater, culture can make a company successful. Following a low-cost strategy as in Southwest Airlines as well as another company equally successful following high margin strategy as was adopted by Concord with British Airways to revive the dying business.

    What about strategy Strategy, simply put, are a set of theories in a series of actions. Yet, a strategy can be put down on paper, but not culture. An expert can give you a splendid strategy but nobody can present to you a successful culture.

    The Marines are different from the regular army because of their culture and not because they have better strategy or weapons. Strategy or innovation when acquired from outside usually fails to get assimilated as its adoption is dependent upon the culture. Just like the human body rejects a foreign part, the organisation will reject a foreign strategy or innovation that is not aligned with its culture. Penney, alienating its customers and demoralising its staff.

    How to Analyse ‘The Crucible’ for the HSC English Common Module

    If one tried to copy the Google model of 20 percent personal time off to promote innovation it most likely will not result in much good at the Postal Services. What about branding One idea that might seem contradictory is that of the brand.

    It would seem that branding can be independent of culture because it seemingly is far removed and external to the organisation. Indeed it takes time to create or destroy a brand and it would seem that marketing and not the company creates a brand.

    Yet upon closer scrutiny, the ultimate driving machine BMW would not have come into existence without engineering and marketing aligning themselves into one cohesive unit. So, by definition, the company culture will have to play a critical role. Cultures in banking, advertising, and technology startup are going to be different because they are trying to create products services or brands that are requiring those cultures. So nothing is independent of the culture. Abigail points the finger at her friends, taking the blame away from herself.

    This sets off a series of events which leads to mass hysteria and panic in the town and false accusations against many of its members. John Proctor, who previously had an affair with Abigail, takes a stand against the corrupt court system which is making false and illogical allegations of witchcraft.

    Proctor himself is inevitably accused, and in response, he agrees to confess to his guilt so that he will not be hanged. At the last minute, he changes his mind, choosing to sacrifice his own life, rather than be complicit in a system built on lies.

    These trials led to the execution of 20 people and the death of five others two infants while in prison. Miller uses these trials in his play as an allegory for McCarthyism. The McCarthy Era was characterised by accusations towards people in the entertainment industry, academicians, and labour-union activists.

    Those accused were often asked to make lists of their friends and colleagues who they believed to be communist. The key ideas include: The conformity of the masses through mass hysteria and mob psychology The importance of the individual and critical thought Corrupt power structures The use of fear to manipulate others Remember that now that you are in Year 12, you want to be identifying key ideas more so than themes.

    Themes are generally one to two words whereas an idea is closer to a thought or sentence. In short, this module is about deepening your understanding of how texts represent the individual and collective human experience.

    This can include examining how texts represent human qualities and emotions associated with, or arising from human experiences. You can read more about Texts and Human Experiences in our guide here! Link 1: Collective human experience of mass hysteria Mass Hysteria The Crucible deals with the collective human experience of mass hysteria. This is closely related to the human emotion of fear.

    Mass hysteria refers to the ways in which a group of people perceive a great threat in society through rumours or fear. In The Crucible, the people of Salem become irrationally afraid of witches in their midst, leading to the false accusations and subsequent executions of a number of people in the town.

    Mob Psychology Mass hysteria is also seen through examples of mob psychology. Mob psychology is a process by which people lose their individuality and their perspectives and beliefs are altered by a crowd.

    This is seen particularly in Act 3 when Abigail convinces the girls in the courtroom that there is a yellow bird above them preparing to attack. We are told all the girls scream and shield their eyes, although the audience can see that the bird is imagined. Miller suggests that mass hysteria and mob psychology are dangerous human emotions and experiences because they stifle truth. Link 2: Paradoxical characters The Crucible is full of paradoxical characters, making it easy to discuss anomalies, paradoxes and inconsistencies in human behaviour and motivations.

    A paradoxical character is a character whose actions are seemingly absurd or contradictory. Abigail Abigail is paradoxical as she is both a victim and a perpetrator. We all know that Abigail is a perpetrator, as her lies act as the driving force which leads to all of the false accusations and imprisonments in the town.

    His immorality is highlighted throughout the play through his adultery and poor treatment of Mary Warren. However, in contrast, he becomes the moral exemplar of the text when he chooses to sacrifice himself in order to be truthful and challenge the corrupt theocracy of the court. The Townspeople Finally, the behaviours and actions of the paranoid townspeople is self-contradictory in that their self-preservation ultimately endangers them.

    People in the town of Salem are quick to falsely accuse their neighbours in order to avoid being accused themselves.


    thoughts on “Taking a closer look the crucible answer key

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *