Home assistant mariadb setup


  • Home Assistant install with docker-compose
  • Migrate Home Assistant to Argon One M.2 SSD
  • Installing Home Assistant on a Raspberry Pi 3 and running from a USB stick
  • How To Install Home Assistant On Raspbian (Raspberry Pi)
  • Setting up Home Assistant using Docker
  • HomeAssistant MQTT MySQL logger – Temperature
  • Home Assistant install with docker-compose

    It acts like a smart home system, so it was a no-brainer for AquaShield to be able to connect to the most widely used smart home environment, the Home Assistant. If you want to use nice and customisable graphs, then you may be interested in Grafana and InfluxDB too. There are also components for them in the Add-on store. Setting Up configuration. You need to copy these entities basically what you own from these to your configuration. You can copy the configuration. On the opening menu panel choose the export.

    Copy the JSON into the textarea on the opened panel, and click the import button. After importing, there are three new flows showing up. The Relay flow that you copied is ready to handle two relays. If you need less, just select the third and fourth row and hit del. If you need more, just select the third and fourth row, hit ctrl-c then ctrl-v.

    The Sensors depend only on what sensors you configured in your confiuguration. In the opening window hit the edit button right to the Server: AS.

    In the new panel press the three dots right to the options JSON string. Press Done, then Update, then Done. If you made everything right, now you have new sensors and switches in your Home Assistant system.

    Configuring Lovelace Finally, we have the connection between Home Assistant and AquaShield Redis server, we have the flows up and running. Now we want to see the Relays, and sensors.

    Create a new one, and look for AquaShield entities: Finally you have to see something like this: With some creativity, and custom card types you can do something like this: Configuring Automations The coolest thing in this automation is that you can connect it to your Smart Home ecosystem, and with this, for example you can control your device eg.

    Or control your other smart devices based on AS sensors. From here, the possibilities are endless! Hope we have your imagination running wild!

    If you have questions, please let us know in the comments! This entry was posted in Knowledge Base , News and tagged home assistant , smart home.

    Migrate Home Assistant to Argon One M.2 SSD

    This will also serve as a second backup in addition to the SD-Card should things go wrong along the way. Fortunately, this process has been simplified thanks to the new Raspberry Pi Imager tool.

    Insert the micro SD-card into your Raspberry Pi and power up the Pi and give it a few mins to boot, update the firmware and set the device to boot from USB. After a few mins, power off the Pi and remove the SD-card. So better to download the latest image directly from the HomeAssistant.

    Connect the M. Once set up the Home Assistant instance should be available at alternatively check your DHCP allocations and determine what IP address has been issued. Otherwise, if your snapshot is password-protected, create a temporary user account, and complete the setup wizard.

    Once uploaded enter the password and select Restore. Once the snapshot has been restored, you should see your Home Assistant instance running as before the migration. We now need to make configuration changes specific to running with the Argon ONE enclosure. If powered on, shutdown your Raspberry Pi.

    In VSCode this can be done using the selector in the footer area. Upon boot hassos will read the rpi-i2c. System: Home Assistant OS 6. Detecting Layout of i2c, we expect to see "1a" here. Argon One Detected. Beginning monitor.. The configration can be changed between degrees F and degrees C.

    You can monitor Home Assisatant temperature using the built in sensor: sensor. This is probably what we want for Home Assistant, in order to ensure that after a power cut, our system is up and running. Sadly older versions of the Argon ONE, Lacked this jumper and could only be set via a special command being sent via i2c.

    This guide provides some clear steps to get access to the underly system that we need. Though the page needs to be translated from Italian by google translate. At least not at the moment. Connect to your Pi on port logging in as root. The lsusb command lists out the attached USB devices, depending on the version of the M.

    Setting this to commit every 60 seconds, does mean that in the event of power loss up to 60 seconds worth of data could be lost. COM ,. Links to other suppliers are included for your convenience.

    Installing Home Assistant on a Raspberry Pi 3 and running from a USB stick

    Here we go. Again, this article is a modified version of a forum post at the Home Assistant forum that I linked to above. This is described on the Raspberry Pi Foundation website here.

    How To Install Home Assistant On Raspbian (Raspberry Pi)

    You then need to run this command from a terminal program to install the code that will program the OTP memory. If you have not already downloaded this, do that now from here I have put the direct link to download it but you can also read here about Hassio — just make sure you remember we are installing Hassio on a Raspberry Pi. I used 32gb Sandisk Cruzer Blade for mine and it seems to work perfectly.

    Just a note regarding Etcher. I have had one successful experience using Etcher. It has some advantages in that you can burn an image file to the device without unzipping it first. I personally find that after the image has been written that Etcher just hangs up and never seems to finish correctly. For this reason I much prefer unzipping the image and using Win32DiskImager. Both tools are readily available and free.

    I have not looked for or investigated a Mac equivalent I know etcher has a Mac variant. I also find that my computer windows 10 based is not too fussed about reading an SD-Card once flashed either and sometimes I need to unplug the SD-Card Reader and plug it in again — but in this case, we are using a USB drive so… If you do use etcher, and it works correctly it will automatically eject the drive.

    If using Win32DiskImager, eject the drive when done. You should find that Windows will recognise the drive now. Bear in mind that the image you have burnt to the USB actually contains 4 different partitions — only one of them is a FAT partition and readable by Windows. You will see it labeled as resin-boot.

    The thing you need to do right now is download Gparted which you will need to use to edit the Linux Ext4 partitions of the USB stick. I downloaded the version called Stable directory. I believe Windows 10 has built in CD creation software anyway.

    At the end you need to have a CD with Gparted on it that you can use to boot your computer. To make the computer boot from the CD and not a Hard Drive as it normally does, I needed to press Del key as the computer was booting and set the CD drive as the first boot device. The computer then booted from the CD and I was able to bring up this screen showing the partitions on the USB device which I plugged into the computer after it had booted.

    There were some options lots of options actually as Gparted booted and I just used the defaults. Eventually I came to a screen with some icons and I clicked on Gparted Icon to bring this up: Once in this screen, you will need to select the correct device so that it shows the USB partitions.

    The screen-shot above is showing the USB partitions already.

    Setting up Home Assistant using Docker

    If you look under the label, you can see resin-boot, resin-rootA, resin-state and resin-data partitions. Then make sure you apply the changes! This is where I diverge from the instructions on the forum. If you can find a way of doing this on your PC or in Gparted good luck to you as I could not find any way to edit the files I needed to edit.

    Note: in Gparted, there is a terminal icon and you can use the terminal to edit the files. I did this on my rebuild.

    Only thing to be aware of is that the name of the partition might be different in Gparted compared to what it will be when you insert it in a Raspberry Pi You can edit the files in resin-boot as it is a fat16 partition but there is no way in Windows to edit the ext4 files in resin-rootA that I could find. Once in PuTTY, execute this command: fdisk -l You will see this screen: We then need to execute these commands note the device name used in the commands corresponds with the device names in the screen-shot above The USB drive is the last drive that was listed.

    Here is the file listing of that partition: A couple of things to notice here. If you need less, just select the third and fourth row and hit del. If you need more, just select the third and fourth row, hit ctrl-c then ctrl-v. The Sensors depend only on what sensors you configured in your confiuguration.

    In the opening window hit the edit button right to the Server: AS. In the new panel press the three dots right to the options JSON string. Press Done, then Update, then Done. If you made everything right, now you have new sensors and switches in your Home Assistant system.

    HomeAssistant MQTT MySQL logger – Temperature

    Configuring Lovelace Finally, we have the connection between Home Assistant and AquaShield Redis server, we have the flows up and running. Now we want to see the Relays, and sensors. Create a new one, and look for AquaShield entities: Finally you have to see something like this: With some creativity, and custom card types you can do something like this: Configuring Automations The coolest thing in this automation is that you can connect it to your Smart Home ecosystem, and with this, for example you can control your device eg.

    Or control your other smart devices based on AS sensors. From here, the possibilities are endless!


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