Ib myp unit planner


  • MYP 2-3 Biology – Completed Unit Planner: Cells
  • Keep up to date with the MYP: The new MYP unit planning process
  • Myp mathematics book
  • MYP Music Unit Plans
  • Planning and study aids, IB MYP English A, DP English A Language and Literature and MYP Film.
  • Big History and the IB Middle Years Program
  • MYP Unit Plans
  • MYP 2-3 Biology – Completed Unit Planner: Cells

    It contains a simple message. We need to work from the inside out of what he identifies as the Golden Circle and this is how I interpret the MYP notion of backward planning. By understanding the pedagogical principles that underpin the core elements of the MYP, indeed the core elements of any of the IB Programmes, educators can understand better the WHY behind each unit that they design, thereby making decisions about the WHAT easier to make.

    What happens when we start at the WHAT? MYP teachers frequently feel they must cover the requirements of the MYP and ensure that all key concepts, global contexts and assessment criteria are covered. I have seen these assumed expectations sometimes lead educators to create somewhat artificial links between elements and clunky Statements of Inquiry.

    This sort of practice gets us through mapping reviews, but it leads us to the question, do we plan units to ensure we cover the requirements of the MYP, or do we plan units to support good IB learning?

    Instead we should understand that the originating purpose of the MYP requirement to ensure coverage was to support balance in the curriculum. Mapping is a tool to check this and inform our adjustments, but it is not the purpose. If we focus on coverage, we lose the sense of purpose. The material becomes disconnected to something that matter, to things that we care about.

    Nobody learns what they do not care about and it is detrimental to student learning. We sometimes force the care through assessment, rewarding success with numbers but this creates compliance: It also makes us as teachers less effective in what we are presenting to the students. We build units that address a list of things to cover and this stops us thinking first about what great things there are to explore. Planning becomes a chore, something done to impress an inspection, but planning is the room for ideas and things to try out.

    Focussing on the rules makes us think we must get it correct and not change it, planning for purpose needs constant reflection and reinvention and even embraces things going wrong: Establishing a Purpose Driven unit starting at the WHY The IB has created an important but often overlooked document called What is an IB education?.

    It has been revised several times most lately in In this document the essential elements of what we are trying to achieve in our MYP teaching are identified. Great IB schools not only encourage International Mindedness, they explicitly teach it.

    This means they plan for it. It helps if your school has a definition for what it understands it to mean. For me an essential element is dialectic thought, the ability to see issues from a variety of perspectives and to be open enough to seek wisdom and solutions to problems from others including other cultures.

    To achieve this level of humility we need our students to grow in character. The IB went a significant way to help here. Note: ManageBac allows you to identify the Learner Profile traits that you are focussed on and why. It is worthwhile considering if your unit might launch or inspire a service or leadership opportunity.

    Both elements should be stretch students outside their comfort zone into new situation. To get the most out of this experience students should reflect on how these provocations made them feel and what they got out of them. There being strong reasons that we should connect to the material emotionally. What are the Approaches to Teaching? The approaches to teaching set out 6 principles that guide how the above is achieved.

    ATT 1 — based on inquiry We have discussed already that developing International Mindedness through the growth of the Learning Profile attributes is a central purpose of IB learning. We also want students to grow in their academic competencies. What role does inquiry have in achieving this? Research indicates that inquiry is best utilised when the student already has some competency in the area that they are exploring.

    This allows students to better evaluate the information that they discover. Therefore, it is worthwhile considering if inquiry fronts the unit or whether it happens once the core ideas are laid down. Inquiry must be more than search and find, it really ought to have an element of wonder-if-then in it. Often there is a parallel need to maintain an awareness that certain additional often National standards are being adhered to. Oftentimes these standards are expressions of subject content. Often content is seen as an ugly bugbear that is antithetical to the MYP.

    This is predicated, I would argue, on a misunderstanding of conceptual curriculums. Concepts, as Lynne Erickson espouses, are timeless and universal ideas that link understandings. Intriguingly, they are established on content. Content contains the facts and examples upon which patterns can be built. I would, on this basis, argue that standards are not an unhelpful place to start with a MYP unit plan. What the MYP educator needs to do is see beyond the examples and facts that must be covered and look for what big idea does they support.

    I would suggest that this is what might be referred to as a disciplinary concept best expressed using language from your discipline.

    First articulate it in your own words. Once you are clear what disciplinary concepts you want to teach consider how this concept links into a wider concept that will help students to understand their world better.

    Again, write this bigger idea in your own words. Only now look at your subject guide and see which related concepts and which key concepts are relevant.

    If they all jar, consider adding a new one this is permitted in the MYP and facilitated by the ManageBac unit planner or perhaps use the concepts in similar way to PYP and see which offer an alternative lens to look at the material with. ATT 3 — developed in local and global contexts The global contexts were written to identify a set of diverse, yet generalised, issues that face us in the world today.

    They were designed to add relevancy to the learning. Sometimes the wording obscures this purpose. Look at each global context and at the issues behind each of sentences within them. Does the conceptual understanding you have identified in the first principle talk to one of these?

    Personally I found it helpful to express these as questions allowing me to understand that each unit brought with it tools to try and answer these questions. First stop off — the Statement of Inquiry Once you have your concepts and global contexts identified then it is time to consider writing your Statement of Inquiry SOI. The problem here is that the SOI drives the unit, so it must be simple to grasp and easy to recall if it is to be effective in this. I therefore recommend that you adapt the understanding you came to in step 1 and link how it informs an exploration of the issue picked out in this step.

    Diane Smith has a new of good videos on this. The progression from the concrete learnings, through to the conceptual ideas and the inquiring explorations are captured in the factual, conceptual and debatable inquiry questions.

    ATT 4 — focused on effective teamwork and collaboration Communication and teamwork are two examples of more universal skills that can be developed the IB calls these ATL skills. One should avoid this trap of seeing them as a list of skills to be covered- To get the most from them I would consider grouping them into two types of skill.

    The first being the skills that you are going to explicitly teach to be effective in your subject. You will teach these in a quite subject specific manner e. But there are also skills that are more generic and that everyone needs to support. This should be the second type of skill that you should teach it is helpful here if the school has some sort of consistency here e. The latter often is not so well prioritised, but these are the skills sought after in further education establishments and in the workplace.

    Doing this allows you to select a smaller number of skills that you can start to articulate what progression looks like in them. This makes it easier for feedback and growth. ATT 5 — differentiated to meet the needs of all learners For many years this was understood to mean that we made adaptations to the curriculum to accommodate different groups of children, whether they be more able sometimes called Gifted and Talented or in need of greater support.

    These adaptations were collectively referred to as differentiation. In recent times a move to greater personalisation over what a student learns, how they learn and how they are assessed on it has emerged. Indeed, the new PYP has placed Agency at the centre of its new model and defined it in the same terms. If you have successfully identified a concept in your initial planning, then it makes it easier to offer more personalisation.

    Each student can find their own examples of how this concept outplays in the world. If you intend, and I would encourage you, to explore this option then keep your cumulating project generic and encourage personal expression.

    Fortunately, the assessment criteria are written generically so this is helpful. ATT 6 — informed by formative and summative assessment To get the best from learners, IB programmes should be both rigorous and challenging. Things are only ever challenging if they are engaging, otherwise they are only difficult.

    The unit should be provocative, it should encourage the students to care about a matter. I would argue a unit is successful in challenging learners when it results in a change of behaviours beyond that which they recall. This leads us to assessment; how do we know if students have risen to the challenge and succeeded. Assessment is such a massive topic that it will be the focus of a future webinar. Suffice to say I strongly believe that assessment serves the learning. In other words, the assessments that we set should support student understanding of material we set, not just measure it.

    When this is returned as a numerical level or grade something happened to the learning to disrupt this dynamic. It is linked the notions of intrinsic and extrinsic motivational factors for learning.

    I would suggest that gentle alarm bells sound if the assessment becomes the focus of the unit even more so if the design of the unit is determined by a particularly constrained reading of the assessment criteria Summary There is a temptation to build MYP unit plans from a list of must-includes. This leads to a formulaic unit that lacks heart. By understanding the principles and priorities of an IB education one can design units that are focussed on learning first and by worrying less about requirements deliver a more authentic IB learning experience.

    FariaPD supports teachers and leaders around the world with hands-on, active and creative professional development experiences.

    Join one of our online or in-person professional development events , each designed to support the unique goals of your school or district. FariaPD is part of Faria Education Group , an international education company that provides services and systems for schools around the world including ManageBac, a curriculum-first learning platform , OpenApply, an online admissions service , and Atlas, a tailored curriculum management solution for schools. In these roles he has developed a thorough working knowledge of school management systems, data analysis Diploma results analysis and pupil monitoring , and a deep understanding of each of the four IB Programmes and how they can be more closely aligned to one another towards a coherent Continuum of IB education.

    Adrian is a trained and active ACE accreditation visitor and has a practical understanding of what constitutes a transformative learning community.

    Keep up to date with the MYP: The new MYP unit planning process

    By the end of our collaborative session, I had a brief outline to take to my colleague for exploration and discussion. MYP would stay as it were until the new exam courses were in place. Instead with the help of the team, we updated the existent MYP units. Now however is the time to improve the MYP curriculum, to make it the foundations for future geographical study and to make learning, assessment and feedback fully integrated through the 3 years so that everything builds on what has come before.

    An MYP unit plan looks something like this please note however that I added SDGs they are not a common feature : Designing our unit The first part of designing a new unit is to decide upon the final outcomes — what do we want students to learn and take away from the unit of study? There are three areas of the unit plan we needed to explore before we could decide on these outcomes, these were a the content to cover b the objectives of the unit c the summative assessment We started by writing a brief outline of the content we thought appropriate whilst at the same time formulating a few key objectives.

    Once we had a rough idea, we discussed the summative assessment and how the three would connect. This was all rough and nothing was set at this point. Once we had a rough idea, we went back to the core elements of an MYP unit; the key concept, relate concepts, global context and statement of inquiry. The aim of these are to establish the purpose of the unit. From there we created the inquiry questions for the unit, these are broken down into factual, conceptual and debatable questions.

    These questions guide the learning and are asked throughout the unit to check for understanding. The next stage of developing a unit is going back to the objectives, content and summative assessment and fine tuning these so they integrate the inquiry questions.

    We decided upon the following objectives and summative assessment for the unit: The unit would develop student understanding of one global issue together — we selected the plastic problem. We would teach students about the issue, management including responsibility and a select few solutions to the plastic problem.

    Student will then use this outline to structure their own awareness raising campaign, which makes up the summative assessment. Our next focus for discussion returned to the content. We had our objectives and summative assessment decided we now needed to align the content, approaches to learning and formative assessment to these. We started by breaking down the content and working out the sub-content.

    Once the sub-content was determined we explored the approaches to learning that could be developed through the content delivered. Students would cover the AtL — Research information literacy in unit 1, so we wanted students to build upon this and selected a further two as shown below.

    Now that we had our objectives, summative assessment, AtLs and content sorted we could consider the formative assessment — these are pieces of work that are assessed by the teacher and feedback is provided to the student. These are the only pieces of work teachers are expected to assess. The aim of any formatively assessed work is that it should feed into the summative assessment and future work.

    Thus meaning that any feedback provided ought to be transferable between topics — thus developing the learner not the work. We decided upon the following: And added in where the formative work fitted into the content. After this unit, we created two more units using the same process.

    However the one difference being ensuring that content and approaches to learning developed through this unit, fed into units 3 and 4 of year 7 MYP year 1. Assessment for Learning and Feedback In order to reduce the workload of assessment, teachers and students are provided with a feedback sheet prior to the task.

    These sheets outline the success criteria for the task. Teachers are encouraged to live mark whilst students work, pointing out the next steps the student could take before completion of the task.

    It may end up looking something like this: Once a formative piece is completed the teacher simply highlights the successes achieved and any relevant next steps.

    If teachers have any specific feedback for individual students they can either write it in or speak to the individual during the lesson in which they receive their feedback. Summative feedback looks very similar, except an MYP grade is provided for the criterion assessed. The key part of producing feedback sheets is that you have to know what you want your students to achieve through the task. This therefore requires an element of planning backwards. Lesson Planning From unit planning came lesson planning.

    During my gained time I created a set of outline lessons to cover the content of the unit. These are just outlines for the class teacher to amend to suit their approach. Hope you found the post of use, feel free to share how you go about planning a new unit or SoW.

    Best wishes,.

    Myp mathematics book

    Once the sub-content was determined we explored the approaches to learning that could be developed through the content delivered. Students would cover the AtL — Research information literacy in unit 1, so we wanted students to build upon this and selected a further two as shown below. Now that we had our objectives, summative assessment, AtLs and content sorted we could consider the formative assessment — these are pieces of work that are assessed by the teacher and feedback is provided to the student.

    These are the only pieces of work teachers are expected to assess.

    MYP Music Unit Plans

    The aim of any formatively assessed work is that it should feed into the summative assessment and future work. Thus meaning that any feedback provided ought to be transferable between topics — thus developing the learner not the work. We decided upon the following: And added in where the formative work fitted into the content.

    After this unit, we created two more units using the same process. However the one difference being ensuring that content and approaches to learning developed through this unit, fed into units 3 and 4 of year 7 MYP year 1. Assessment for Learning and Feedback In order to reduce the workload of assessment, teachers and students are provided with a feedback sheet prior to the task.

    These sheets outline the success criteria for the task. Teachers are encouraged to live mark whilst students work, pointing out the next steps the student could take before completion of the task.

    It may end up looking something like this: Once a formative piece is completed the teacher simply highlights the successes achieved and any relevant next steps. We follow their journey of implementing the enhancements to the MYP following its review and first teaching in The unit planning process is a highly personal journey for a team of teachers. It is in fact one of a set of parallel journeys that involve planning, teaching, assessing and reporting processes.

    The MYP unit planners support the connectedness of these journeys. If our philosophical beliefs about the nature of the learning process are to be fully realized in the classroom, this connectedness is vital. Confidence in the unit planner does not guarantee that classroom practices will be impacted by the ideas unit planners contain, yet a planner that accurately reflects the pedagogical approaches of the MYP is an essential starting point, a foundation.

    To build confidence in our unit planners, every now and then some feedback is important. One of the benefits of the BQC service for the IB community, apart from individual feedback to teachers, is the identification of common areas in need of improvement across the hundreds of participating MYP schools.

    It must be remembered that the BQC service started at the same time that significant changes were being implemented by MYP schools following the review.

    Planning and study aids, IB MYP English A, DP English A Language and Literature and MYP Film.

    In this sense, it was as much a learning journey for those of us involved in the BQC service as it was for participating schools that were in the process of rewriting their unit planners. As you would expect, when there are problems with the statement of inquiry, the rest of the unit is impacted. Are there too many related concepts leading to an overly complicated statement of inquiry, which can be difficult for students to access?

    Does the statement of inquiry align to other parts of the unit such as the summative assessment task for example? They were designed to add relevancy to the learning. Sometimes the wording obscures this purpose. Look at each global context and at the issues behind each of sentences within them.

    Big History and the IB Middle Years Program

    Does the conceptual understanding you have identified in the first principle talk to one of these? Personally I found it helpful to express these as questions allowing me to understand that each unit brought with it tools to try and answer these questions. First stop off — the Statement of Inquiry Once you have your concepts and global contexts identified then it is time to consider writing your Statement of Inquiry SOI.

    The problem here is that the SOI drives the unit, so it must be simple to grasp and easy to recall if it is to be effective in this. I therefore recommend that you adapt the understanding you came to in step 1 and link how it informs an exploration of the issue picked out in this step.

    MYP Unit Plans

    Diane Smith has a new of good videos on this. The progression from the concrete learnings, through to the conceptual ideas and the inquiring explorations are captured in the factual, conceptual and debatable inquiry questions.

    ATT 4 — focused on effective teamwork and collaboration Communication and teamwork are two examples of more universal skills that can be developed the IB calls these ATL skills.

    One should avoid this trap of seeing them as a list of skills to be covered- To get the most from them I would consider grouping them into two types of skill. The first being the skills that you are going to explicitly teach to be effective in your subject.

    You will teach these in a quite subject specific manner e. But there are also skills that are more generic and that everyone needs to support. This should be the second type of skill that you should teach it is helpful here if the school has some sort of consistency here e.

    The latter often is not so well prioritised, but these are the skills sought after in further education establishments and in the workplace. Doing this allows you to select a smaller number of skills that you can start to articulate what progression looks like in them. This makes it easier for feedback and growth. ATT 5 — differentiated to meet the needs of all learners For many years this was understood to mean that we made adaptations to the curriculum to accommodate different groups of children, whether they be more able sometimes called Gifted and Talented or in need of greater support.

    These adaptations were collectively referred to as differentiation. In recent times a move to greater personalisation over what a student learns, how they learn and how they are assessed on it has emerged.

    Indeed, the new PYP has placed Agency at the centre of its new model and defined it in the same terms. If you have successfully identified a concept in your initial planning, then it makes it easier to offer more personalisation. Each student can find their own examples of how this concept outplays in the world.

    If you intend, and I would encourage you, to explore this option then keep your cumulating project generic and encourage veena notes expression. Fortunately, the assessment criteria are written generically so this is helpful. ATT 6 — informed by formative and summative assessment To get the best from learners, IB programmes should be both rigorous and challenging. Things are only ever challenging if they are engaging, otherwise they are only difficult.

    The unit should be provocative, it should encourage the students to care about a matter. I would argue a unit is successful in challenging learners when it results in a change of behaviours beyond that which they recall. This leads us to assessment; how do we know if students have risen to the challenge and succeeded.

    Assessment is such a massive topic that it will be the focus of a future webinar.


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