9mm pistol compensator


  • Best 9mm Compensator
  • TBC 9mm Glock Pistol Micro Compensator Muzzle Brake
  • Barrel Accessories
  • Best 9 MM Compensator
  • The 4 Best Glock Compensators
  • Glock 19 Match 9MM Barrel with 9/16x32 Thread 4-Port Compensator (Gen 1-4)
  • Best 9mm Compensator

    Search Compensated Handguns - The Pros and Cons Compensated Handguns are making big strides in the market, but is the juice worth the squeeze? Tacking crap onto a handgun is a favorite past time of concealed carriers. We love to tinker, to experiment, and to upgrade our guns, sights, optics, triggers, and these days, compensators. Compensated handguns are the new bee's knees, and today we will cover the pros and cons of a comped firearm.

    Compensated Handguns A compensator is a device that attaches to your barrel and directs the gas that's leaving the barrel upwards. When a handgun is fired, the gun recoils upwards. The gas being propelled upwards by the compensator creates a force that pushes the gun down.

    This mitigates muzzle rise and helps keep your weapon on target. Some firearms are internally compensated, and this involves porting along the barrel, and on an automatic pistol, the slide is also cut to accommodate porting. Pros of Comped Handguns The immediate pros of a comped handgun is the muzzle rise mitigation offered.

    Less muzzle rise means more control, and more control allows you to accurately pull the trigger faster and land follow-up shots on target more effectively. You can cut par times and land more on target with tighter groups with compensated handguns. Some compensators are also muzzle brakes. These have side ports that help reduce recoil as well as muzzle rise.

    Compensated handguns make using a weapon with one hand much more comfortable. The difference is night and day when you have to engage with a single hand or even your off-hand with a comped gun. Multiple target engagements are quicker and more efficient, with rounds being placed closer together in less time.

    With more practice, that number will improve. It's also important to note the compensators I am using are all focused on concealed carry compensators. I have none of the competition-grade models, which are often more extensive and more effective. Whatever you aim to do with a handgun can be faster and more efficiently with a comp.

    Downsides From a concealed carry perspective adding a compensator to a handgun will result in a longer and heavier gun. The extra length and weight will vary between comps, but there will be some added length. Companies like Parker Mountain Machine are doing a great job of reducing comp size, but the gun will ultimately be bigger.

    Bigger is rarely better when it comes to concealment. The gas being propelled up can be a blast, literally, to the shooter. If you are shooting at unorthodox positions, like close retention, you might get a face full of gas. It's a minor discomfort but far from challenging to deal with. Turning the gun away from you and angling the port away solves the problem.

    Like most things with guns, it's all about training. Muzzle Flash Muzzle flash is something often proclaimed to be a problem with compensators.

    Since the gas is being ported upwards, it carries some flash with it. This often results in the claim one shot in low light will kill night vision. There are two problems with this. If the light is so low you can be blinded by muzzle flash, can you even confirm the target is a threat? A well-lit area will wash out any muzzle flash. The second is that common defensive calibers don't have that much flash from comps. It's there, but not enough to kill your vision or blind you like a flashbang.

    I would say a comped 9mm is about the same flash as a snub nose. Bigger magnum calibers are capable of creating a somewhat blinding flash, and that's where most people judge compensated handguns from.

    Is It For You? I'm still learning, experimenting, and figuring out what works for me as far as compensated handguns go. I like them so far and find them to be a real game-changer. Every little bit helps when it comes to defensive shooting, and if there is an advantage you can take, why not take it?

    Are compensated handguns for you? Let us know below. He serves as an NRA certified pistol instructor and pursues a variety of firearms based hobbies. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Travis Pike and the CrossBreed Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

    TBC 9mm Glock Pistol Micro Compensator Muzzle Brake

    The muzzle brake of this model is made from Grade 5 titanium in your choice of finish. It may look classic gray or have black DLC coverage. This expansion joint is very small in size. The length is 2. The actual addition to the stem length is only 2. This add-on is available in 4 modifications to suit the needs of all popular calibers. For caliber 5. Regardless of the modification chosen, this will weigh 2.

    As it turns out, it works as intended — it softens the recoil well and redirects the thunder of the shot forward. Your hearing will get a little rest if you use this compensator.

    The muzzle brake comes with a crushing disc and a lifetime warranty, which means it is ready to work for you from the very first day of purchase and for many years to come.

    This dampens recoil quite a bit because it directs the gas in the same direction as the bullet, but it can significantly reduce the noise level. You will not receive a concussion from the shot if you install this compensator. TacFire has prepared 5 modifications so that you can find the right compensator for any caliber.

    This linear expansion joint is made of steel in the shape of a 2. If you are using forend-mounted accessories you must consider the outside diameter of this add-on. This protrudes about 0. If you wish to use one compensator for several rifles of different calibers, you may need an adapter that matches the barrel and compensator threads.

    In general, this is the muzzle of the cheap segment, which means you should not expect five-star machining from it. The Lithium PCC Compensator is designed to significantly reduce recoil and deliver faster follow-up shots. Aggressive ports point upward in a V-pattern.

    Barrel gases are diverted from the line of sight, so the shooter always has full control of the situation. This expansion joint is manufactured from stainless steel and is machined. Ultradyne has a good quality control department, so your compensator will be perfectly finished.

    In addition, the expansion joint is coated with black SB nitride, which increases its corrosion resistance. With an OD of 1. Yes, it shifts the balance a little, but during the shot, the recoil is reduced by almost 2 times! Included with the muzzle brake, you will find a temporary nut that will make it easier to install the computer. Overall, this is solid stainless steel that is much easier to shoot with.

    Barrel Accessories

    This expansion joint is very small in size. The length is 2. The actual addition to the stem length is only 2. This add-on is available in 4 modifications to suit the needs of all popular calibers. For caliber 5. Regardless of the modification chosen, this will weigh 2. As it turns out, it works as intended — it softens the recoil well and redirects the thunder of the shot forward.

    Your hearing will get a little rest if you use this compensator. The muzzle brake comes with a crushing disc and a lifetime warranty, which means it is ready to work for you from the very first day of purchase and for many years to come.

    This dampens recoil quite a bit because it directs the gas in the same direction as the bullet, but it can significantly reduce the noise level. You will not receive a concussion from the shot if you install this compensator. TacFire has prepared 5 modifications so that you can find the right compensator for any caliber.

    Best 9 MM Compensator

    This linear expansion joint is made of steel in the shape of a 2. If you are using forend-mounted accessories you must consider the outside diameter of this add-on. One of the unique features of the Velocity Compensator is the reduced port locking ring. This reduces the effectiveness of the compensator and allows the weapon to perform as needed. Rather than attaching a compensator as a separate device to the muzzle, the Mass Driver replaces the recoil spring and guide rod and remains apart from the reciprocating barrel.

    That has the immediate advantage of not interfering with the cycle of a recoil-operated firearm, which may function more efficiently with some loads than others because of the weight difference. If you live in a jurisdiction that restricts access to threaded muzzles or devices designed to attach to muzzles, the Mass Driver is the perfect solution.

    Once installed, the Mass Driver reduces recoil and muzzle climb in 2 ways. The Mass Driver, being separate from the barrel, moves forward to counterbalance the recoil. This is achieved by the same gases that are eventually exhausted.

    The device ships with a guide rod, which is longer than standard, and new recoil spring to install the Mass Driver. Although it is machined with smooth edges to not catch on clothing or equipment, this compensator still adds length and bulk to the weapon. Muzzle Brakes, Compensators, and Barrel Porting The terms muzzle brake and compensator are sometimes used interchangeably, and there can be a functional overlap, but there are differences.

    Muzzle brake: The purpose of this type of muzzle device is to exert a braking effect on the weapon, reducing its rearward recoil velocity. When the high-velocity propellant gases leave the muzzle, they impact the baffles or other surface areas inside the brake, applying forward pressure against it, opposite to the direction of the recoil. You often see muzzle brakes on heavy-caliber rifles, such as those chambered in. Compensators: While the differences are not set in stone, and there is some overlap between the two, the primary purpose of a compensator is to reduce muzzle climb, also called rise, flip, and jump, especially during rapid semi-automatic and fully automatic fire.

    You usually see compensators on machine pistols e.

    The 4 Best Glock Compensators

    The compensator may simply be a cylinder with the top half cut off in fully automatic weapons, as in the AKM slant compensator. In this design, the gases are also directed upward at an angle to counteract the tendency of a right-handed shooter to cant the rifle in that direction. Porting: A related feature to compensators is barrel porting. Rather than a separate device attached to a threaded muzzle, this involves drilling a series of holes directly into the barrel sometimes with corresponding slots machined into the slide to allow gases to escape as the bullet passes.

    These holes may be straight or angled, directing the gases upward or rearward. Why is it Important to Reduce Recoil? In weapons that fire powerful ammunition, such as hunting and anti-materiel rifles AMRreducing recoil is often necessary to avoid injury or discomfort.

    Glock 19 Match 9MM Barrel with 9/16x32 Thread 4-Port Compensator (Gen 1-4)

    Harsh recoil can also exacerbate shooter fatigue. However, the priority is to reduce felt recoil and muzzle rise in tactical and competitive shooting weapons. These factors can have a deleterious effect on rapid-fire accuracy — a vital asset for succeeding in competitions surviving violence.


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