Tannoy eaton review


  • Review: Tannoy Legacy Cheviot
  • TANNOY EATON SPEAKERS: HIGH CALORIE SOUND
  • Cheviot is also the name of a classic Tannoy loudspeaker, launched in by the prestigious British speaker company of more than 90 years in the business. Originating in in London as the Tulsemere Manufacturing Company, saw the company relocate to the Scottish town of Coatbridge where the company still manufacturers its higher-end speaker lines, with the Eclipse, Mercury and Revolution models being manufactured to rigorous standards in China. One of the latest products to come from the Coatbridge facility is the three-strong Legacy range.

    These thoroughly modern reworks of three classic Tannoy models — the Eaton, Cheviot and Arden — were developed closely following the original design while cleverly incorporating the advancements in loudspeaker design accrued over the last 40 years.

    Hand made and finished to a high standard by skilled engineers in Scotland, each model features a walnut veneered cabinet of 19MM MDF with internal plywood bracing for structural rigidity. Removable, acoustically transparent cloth grilles conceal adjustable crossovers, front-facing ports and the sizeable dual-concentric driver at the heart of each speaker.

    His design was such that the flare of the bass driver continued the flare rate of the high-frequency unit, providing a single point source with an inherently low crossover frequency, low levels of colouration and high levels of efficiency that were unheard of at the time.

    While the concept of the Dual-Concentric driver has remained the same, major technological advancements over the last 70 years have seen considerable improvements in design and performance. To cover the history and evolution of the dual-concentric driver would require several pages and is beyond the scope of this article, though this article gives an excellent rundown. Yet this was little known, and the consumer remained largely ignorant to the Dual-Concentric principle.

    A trio of drivers were developed to fit five cabinet models — the Arden, Berkeley, Cheviot, Devon and Eaton — and the drivers were sold also as kits complete with a crossover and terminal panel for the professional market or home constructor.

    The range was universally accepted worldwide but especially in Japan where it helped to establish Tannoy as a manufacturer of high-quality loudspeakers in the Far East.

    Lockwood Audio chose the HPD drivers for a range of studio monitors which found their way into many professional studios, continuing the legacy of the Monitor Gold. The Legacy Trio Reproducing the lowest bass notes requires that the driver move a large volume of air. Larger drivers are more efficient, requiring less excursion than a smaller driver to move a given volume of air. Larger drivers however require larger baffles and thus larger enclosures which can compromise the aesthetics of the speaker and hinder practical placement.

    Most modern speakers utilise smaller drivers in conjunction with a reflex-ported cabinet or transmission line, so as to allow for a slimmer cabinet design. While a larger driver is naturally capable of producing frequencies lower than a smaller counterpart, there is more to a speaker than a single driver and modern slim towers are quite capable of keeping up with their larger counterparts.

    However there is nothing quite like a big driver in a big cabinet where quantity and quality of bass, massive imaging and sheer volume and scale are concerned. The Eaton is a substantial standmount while both the Cheviot and Arden are floor-standing models. Adjustments are made by moving a pair of gold-plated finger bolts to the respective holes in the panel.

    The speakers are delivered with the controls set at the level position, in which the flattest, most linear response will be obtained. The crossover frequency of 1. The three models share the same panel of 24K gold-plated terminals, including a fifth ground terminal designed to reduce RF interference and improve midrange clarity. The remainder of this review will focus on the Cheviots, rather than the Legacy range as a whole. Out Of The Box The packaging is nothing out of the ordinary though it does present a great first impression, the speakers wrapped in cloth bags and supported by substantial foam blocks on each corner.

    Some documentation including a certificate of authenticity and an owners kit are supplied with each pair. This package includes a pot of wax for wood upkeep, along with a set of bridging cables, carpet spikes and a set of screw-in feet for hard floors as opposed to the traditional spike cups. I did in fact hear the Ardens at a private viewing in February when Tannoy invited me along for a listen and to offer some feedback. They were a friendly bunch too with great musical taste, conversation and even whiskey samples.

    Later appointments prevented me indulging in the latter, though it was a nice nod to the companies Scottish heritage. Like the rest of the Legacy range, the Cheviots are unfussy when it comes to positioning though a bit of breathing space is highly recommended and the floor-standing models in particular are best suited to medium-sized rooms.

    Mine is on the small side for such sizeable speakers, though I was still able to achieve a position that eliminated any unwelcome resonance and allowed for optimal performance. I did experiment with various positions. I lessened the angle considerably and the sound stage opened up, losing a little of the pin-point focus but presenting a far more pleasing, and larger, stereo image.

    A few weeks of run-in time followed during which the Cheviots loosened up considerably, the mid range relaxing and the low end improving as I also became accustomed to their sound.

    The amp is very much a traditional design too with a powerful class AB circuit driven by a massive power supply and fully discrete analogue pre amplification stages. Were it not for the fact that the value of vintage kit has skyrocketed in the last couple of years, I might have opted for something a little older but such a venture would have been aesthetic more than anything and my system turned out to be a great match for the Cheviots. I receive a surprising number of complaints concerning my choice of cabling in recent reviews.

    Ordinary lighting flex is suitable for distances of up to 50 feet. Simply put, cables get a signal from A to B and resistance, inductance and capacitance are the only parameters that matter, marketing hype, inflated prices and audiophile nonsense get you nowhere. Choose a correctly specified cable and it should perform as well as any other. Massive scale and vast imaging met with an articulate low end and an expressive midrange.

    These are characteristics of many a Tannoy, old and new; though nothing prepares you for the sheer dynamic slam of a large speaker. The Cheviots are quite capable of shifting some air and very little power can raise the roof, but to achieve both while remaining so articulate, expressive and natural is an area where few, if any, can truly equal a Dual-Concentric Tannoy.

    These were as good a starting point as any, and the Cheviots did not disappoint. The Technics turntable is known for its somewhat energetic delivery and exceptional timing and the Cheviots conveyed that with the kind of nimble low-end agility one would expect from a smaller driver, yet with the depth and texture that only a big driver can deliver.

    So, so good. How low can they go? Released on the Fuelled by Ramen label, this is a largely upbeat alternative album though one with plenty of variation in style and some depth lyrical content should you care to listen with analytical intent. It really rocks though, and hearing it on the Cheviots only served to reiterate why it is by far one of my favourite discoveries of though it was in fact a release.

    I had some concerns regarding the height of the Cheviots. While no doubt a large speaker, their short, stocky cabinets place the high-frequency driver below ear height for most people when seated on an average height sofa. My concerns were unfounded however as imaging was excellent, the Cheviots producing sound stages of massive proportion with width, height and depth of equal degree. Were I to own a pair I would perhaps consider building some plinths to raise them up a bit more, but this is a matter of personal preference, not necessity.

    Initial listening over, I experimented with the crossover adjustments. It was the sound on which I ultimately settled, as I found that maxing the energy control caused the highs to overshadow the Cheviots glorious midrange.

    Summary These are big speakers with a huge sound. Audiophile nonsense aside, these are truly terrific speakers, from which music flows with apparent ease. Highly recommended. Share this:.

    Speakers, so slim, they disappear within their own anorexic slenderness if viewed head on. I often wonder if the hi-fi industry is sacrificing itself on the alter of interior design. A slave to some obscure marketing perception that money is to be found in the lifestyle arena. Wherever and whatever that is.

    Not a sound and music perspective. My god, speakers are packed with enough compromises as it is. Which, as I say, is why I like Tannoy. Tannoy raises a lower frequency modulated middle finger to the industry, daytime TV home makeover programmes and the soft furnishings department in Laura Ashley.

    The meaty looking Eaton speaker is a prime example of what Tannoy is all about. You can see the original models, pictured below many thanks to Hamiltononkeith on Youtube for the image and you can hear the originals in action playing a slice of Pink Floyd, if you want a demo of that early sound Now under new ownership, Tannoy has looked again at the Eaton design.

    The new Eaton incorporates changes, as you might expect. The driver and electronic component technology, for example. Each Eaton loudspeaker cabinet is hand made at the Coatbridge, Scotland workshop from 19mm MDF with plywood internal bracing plus damping.

    There are 12mm rubber pads on the base and twin, front-firing ports, on the upper front fascia which will aid room positioning. This beautifully designed area is almost Victorian in its finish. With an 89db sensitivity, the speakers span x x mm and weigh 20kg.

    The speakers arrive with a nylon grill cover but I removed them for testing. The speakers are finished to high standard. I mounted them on low and wide speaker stands. In terms of component matching, I would lean towards valves. Lots of precision and focus but no soul. Not the fault of the Leema, just a match-up issue. You might like the solid state-backed sound with the Eatons. For a few seconds, I was motionless and a bit dumb-founded.

    The nature of the stereo imaging was just staggering. Many speakers take the soundstage and present it to you in a fairly flat manner. Then some of the good examples push the stereo image back and provide depth and a slice of 3D to add a firming image. Not the Tannoys. What the Eatons did was to pick up the lead singer, Mark E.

    Smith, and drag him forward into new space. Then they placed air and space around him. I felt that I could have risen from my chair and walked around him. That was how crafted the image was. Not so much 3D as hologrammatic! Tannoy do bass like no other.

    This track is dominated by the drums and, hence, the bass is not just important here, it is absolutely critical. No, the Eatons bring bass from the very basement of hell and it rumbles up from that space, from the place that Beelzebub keeps his ladders, bikes and leaf blower. It slowly bubbles to the surface like a lower frequency tidal wave and booms at you quietly and slowly and with threat.

    Real threat. Yet, the bass was never sluggish. It was mobile, swift and fleeting when required. So much for the soundstage and bass, what of the ever important upper frequencies? I found the treble, from the cymbals, informative, slightly warm but wholly informative. I had a feeling that the treble was emanating from a big piece of metal: which it did, of course. Hence, treble also had substance and weight. Upper mids offered a similar response with the manic lead guitar offering plenty of clarity and detail to provide insight and an awareness of exactly what the player was up to in terms of application and effort.

    I tested the Treble Energy plug and was impressed how it affected sound. Great to really push well recorded LPs but maybe too much for slightly compressed fare.

    Nice to have the option, though. Similarly, lowering the Roll Off by 2db added a touch of bite to the upper mids but in subtle terms, enough to enhance detail and lift the lead guitar to interesting levels. What I like about these switches is that they are real world and practical options. The sonic change is real but the steps are not too large.

    This LP has been mastered with obvious compression and so needs careful handling to perform well. Grant performs in front of a relatively complex jazz-tinged orchestra. Grant has one of those vibrato-rich voices which can be utilised and thrown about to express all kinds of emotion. Some speakers fail to control it, though, making it sound like a windsock in a hurricane.

    The Eatons grabbed the Grant voice and gave it freedom to manoeuvre but never allowed it to lose its form or character. She commanded it, took a lead in directing where and when it moved here and there and, thus made the entire performance far more palatable and enjoyable. The brass, meanwhile, occupied an airy bubble of their own. The added space applied to the brass gave them their own reverb tails which added a sense of dynamism when the brass pitched in.

    Highlights includes the Sylvian signature delivery which, via the Eatons, sounded as if it emerged from his diaphragm. Detail and insight was such that the harmonies behind his lead vocal were delightfully detailed, sweet-sounding and tuneful.

    Meanwhile, secondary percussion such as the simple wooden block was open, clear and succinct. If all you care about is music though — and if you are buying hi-fi of any sort, you really should — then the Tannoys will not only please, they will delight and, quite often, shock in a nice way, of course. If you have forgotten how music can amaze you, try and demo a pair of Tannoy Eatons and be reminded all over again.

    The Legacy Trio Reproducing the lowest bass notes requires that the driver move a large volume of air. Larger drivers are more efficient, requiring less excursion than a smaller driver to move a given volume of air.

    Larger drivers however require larger baffles and thus larger enclosures which can compromise the aesthetics of the speaker and hinder practical placement. Most modern speakers utilise smaller drivers in conjunction with a reflex-ported cabinet or transmission line, so as to allow for a slimmer cabinet design. While a larger driver is naturally capable of producing frequencies lower than a smaller counterpart, there is more to a speaker than a single driver and modern slim towers are quite capable of keeping up with their larger counterparts.

    However there is nothing quite like a big driver in a big cabinet where quantity and quality of bass, massive imaging and sheer volume and scale are concerned. The Eaton is a substantial standmount while both the Cheviot and Arden are floor-standing models. Adjustments are made by moving a pair of gold-plated finger bolts to the respective holes in the panel. The speakers are delivered with the controls set at the level position, in which the flattest, most linear response will be obtained.

    The crossover frequency of 1. The three models share the same panel of 24K gold-plated terminals, including a fifth ground terminal designed to reduce RF interference and improve midrange clarity. The remainder of this review will focus on the Cheviots, rather than the Legacy range as a whole.

    Out Of The Box The packaging is nothing out of the ordinary though it does present chartink app great first impression, the speakers wrapped in cloth bags and supported by substantial foam blocks on each corner.

    Some documentation including a certificate of authenticity and an owners kit are supplied with each pair. This package includes a pot of wax for wood upkeep, along with a set of bridging cables, carpet spikes and a set of screw-in feet for hard floors as opposed to the traditional spike cups. I did in fact hear the Ardens at a private viewing in February when Tannoy invited me along for a listen and to offer some feedback.

    They were a friendly bunch too with great musical taste, conversation and even whiskey samples. Later appointments prevented me indulging in the latter, though it was a nice nod to the companies Scottish heritage. Like the rest of the Legacy range, the Cheviots are unfussy when it comes to positioning though a bit of breathing space is highly recommended and the floor-standing models in particular are best suited to medium-sized rooms.

    Mine is on the small side for such sizeable speakers, though I was still able to achieve a position that eliminated any unwelcome resonance and allowed for optimal performance. Quite the opposite. There is a simple logic behind this design: large speaker drivers are essential to deliver convincing and clear-cut lows.

    Tannoy did not come up with this idea; it? The larger the emissive surface of a driver, the better its transient response and efficiency. Larger drivers also require less power from the amplifier, which results in a much lower distortion rate. If modern speakers use such small drivers, this is because the current trend is to make speakers as discreet and easy to integrate into a living room as possible. The original Tannoy Cheviot is in the background on the right.

    The Tannoy Legacy range was designed to go completely against this trend. The Tannoy Cheviot is an impressive object, not because of its size it is only 2. The oak veneer is absolutely stunning, very soft and pleasant to the touch. Such a high level of craftsmanship is so rare that simply coming into contact with the speaker was a thrilling experience.

    The Cheviot even comes with a jar of beeswax with which to polish the wood cabinet. Its sensitivity rating of 91 dB implies a linear frequency response, rated at 38 Hz to 30 kHz by the manufacturer.

    The tweeter? The generous range of adjustment is a wonderful trait, as it allows the user to fine-tune the speaker?

    While this speaker seems to have been mainly designed for music restitution, it also ensures a convincing home theater experience without an absolute need for a subwoofer. A tweeter is located in the middle of the driver? This technology ensures optimal dispersion of the entire frequency range covered by the two drivers. This is not just a marketing gimmick; coaxial technology ensures great results, and many brands have adopted it for this very reason Elipson, KEF, Cabasse, etc.

    Nevertheless, the Tannoy Legacy Cheviot? The sheer size of this transducer 12? The tweeter uses the cone as a horn to amplify the mids mechanically incidentally, the tweeter? The tweeter covers particularly low frequencies down to 1. The cone is made of cellulose fiber and has an irregular surface to ensure optimal damping properties. The Tannoy Legacy Cheviot? The design and manufacturing quality are quite spectacular. The tweeter is almost invisible, hidden behind a gold-plated Tulip waveguide.

    The double-horn shape of the waveguide ensures optimal directivity of high frequencies. The 1. As early as the company was taken over by Harman International Industries, with the company founder Guy R. Fountain retiring.

    Review: Tannoy Legacy Cheviot

    New times… However, it was precisely this takeover that brought many a legendary system of the early years back into focus, because the company now deliberately wanted to counteract any rumours and emphasise its connection with its own roots.

    In addition, a remarkable hype about vintage systems played into the hands of the company, so that many a noble system of the heyday experienced a new edition. The interesting thing is that, in the case of Tannoy Ltd. Slim, almost graceful, and thus discreetly integrable into the living space — this has been the credo of the loudspeaker developers for years and days.

    With the best will in the world, all this cannot be attested to the vintage solutions from Tannoy Ltd. Whether this is a Tannoy Canterbury, Tannoy Eaton or Tannoy GRF, in any case, these are loudspeaker systems that somehow seem to have fallen out of time in terms of design.

    TANNOY EATON SPEAKERS: HIGH CALORIE SOUND

    The unique sound experience is then added… But such systems do not only have their price, they also require corresponding space, so that the target group remains quite manageable, even if the potential would be much greater in principle, there would only be solutions that also give this unique charm of days gone by with more living space-friendly dimensions… The essence in its smallest form… So it is a very clever move that Tannoy Ltd.

    The Tannoy Autograph Mini-OW is a loudspeaker system that exactly meets the requirements outlined above. Because at first sight this speaker looks exactly like these models, but it is everything in the truest sense of the word en miniature… The Tannoy Autograph Mini-OW measures x x mm and weighs 4.

    No comparison to its bigger siblings, where you can usually add a zero before the decimal point in the data sheet without hesitation. Thus the Tannoy Autograph Mini-OW fits into any living room without any problems and can even — strictly speaking — pass for a desktop audio solution. The first contact… When you unpack the Tannoy Autograph Mini-OW, every single movement of the handle is exactly the charm you expect.

    The perfectly finished surfaces in a noble walnut finish are stroked with relish, whereby manual labour is used and the surface is oiled.

    This is cleverly combined with a covering that flanked the baffle with a delicate stripe, so that it forms a charming contrast even when the equally well made speaker grill is not used. In fact, this should only be used when absolutely necessary, otherwise the view of the perfectly executed baffle is hidden. The ring, with which the drivers are embedded in the baffle, is also made of brass and has been solidly attached to it several times with gold screws.

    One more word about the speaker grill, which is also made of wood, the covering is made of grey mottled textile fabric as described. The grill is held in position by magnets, but is not placed on top of the grill, but is kept almost flat in the front by a baffle slightly offset to the rear.

    The basic shape of the speaker roughly corresponds to a triangle, so that no standing waves inside should cloud the reproduction.


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