Aspera phone problems


  • Aspera Jazz 2 USB Drivers
  • Aspera F40 4G Flip Phone
  • The Aspera R40 is a rugged phone that won’t break the bank or your heart if it’s lost or destroyed
  • Aspera F40 review: Features | Pricing | Specs
  • Aspera Jazz 2 USB Drivers

    If you're paying less than a hundred dollars for an unlocked phone, you shouldn't expect too much from it. There's a reason why flagship phones generally come with four-figure price tags, although other members of the iTWire team have pointed out eg 1 , eg 2 that it isn't necessary to spend a thousand bucks to get a decent phone. We'll bypass the perennial iPhone vs Android debate, on the assumption that potential buyers will have already decided which camp they are in before looking at the Aspera Mobile Jazz 2 and similar phones.

    We'll also assume that they have settled on a basic smartphone rather than a feature phone such as Aspera's similarly priced F40 4G flip-phone. However, we did briefly wonder how a smartphone — with its more-demanding CPU requirements, much bigger screen and higher capacity battery — can be sold at the same price as a handset like the F Is it subsidised by the inclusion of non-removable apps?

    More on that later. So what is the Jazz 2 like to use? It usually took about 30 seconds to start up, which is about the same as an older low-end model from ZTE. That's not too bad, but it is appreciably slower than our 'daily driver' iPhone 7. On one occasion we timed the Jazz 2's startup at one minute and 20 seconds. That remained a mystery outlier because it didn't happen again during the test period.

    Talking of the iPhone 7, the Jazz 2 is practically the same width and height as that device. In our opinion, around 14cm is as tall as you want a phone to be, otherwise it doesn't fit comfortably in the front pocket of a pair of jeans. The Jazz 2 is significantly thicker than a bare iPhone 7, but there's very little between them once you put the iPhone in a basic protective case. There's nothing much wrong with the Jazz 2's appearance as long as you're not expecting a metal frame or a metal or glass back.

    However, the curved edges and surface finish are slippery to the extent that we dropped it several times during testing — fortunately not from any great height or onto hard surfaces. If you are among the apparent minority who still think a phone is for talking to people, we found the sound quality to be particularly clear in both directions. A possible contributor is the way the microphone vent is on the front of the phone rather than the increasingly common placement on the lower edge which we suspect is one of the reasons why we increasingly see people using speakerphone mode — subjecting those around them to both sides of the conversation — with the foot of their phones pointing to their mouths.

    This smartphone was our first experience with Android's Go edition, which — in conjunction with Go edition apps — is supposed to be optimised for lower-performance devices and varying levels of connectivity. We found the Jazz 2 somewhat laggy, to the extent that we initially found ourselves wondering wonder whether touches had actually registered. That caused a few problems for the first day or two until we learned to adopt a slower pace.

    To test the claims about intermittent connectivity, we used Maps Go on the Jazz 2 and the regular version of Maps on another device to navigate the same route.

    Wireless data was switched off on both phones, and they both performed similarly. So if Go does make a difference in this respect, we didn't notice it. To be clear, to the extent this is a criticism, it is of Go rather than Aspera's handset. The Jazz 2 is relatively unburdened by bloatware, but the Facebook Lite app is preloaded and can't be uninstalled. If there was one app you'd want to remove for privacy and other reasons, this is probably it.

    At least it can be disabled. Another sign of low-end hardware was that the image from the main camera seemed relatively jerky while we composed shots by moving the phone around. Using the camera made the screen's blue cast very apparent, especially when shooting white surfaces. Transferring photos to other devices and also printing them showed the colour shift was down to the screen. The Jazz 2's screen was bright enough outdoors on an overcast day, but was only just usable noticeably worse than the iPhone 7 in full sun.

    To give an idea of the quality of the camera, here are a couple of shots taken on the Jazz 2 and on the iPhone 7, scaled to fit iTWire's layout. Even at the reduced size, the differences are apparent. You probably wouldn't use this phone's camera to record a holiday or a significant event if you had a choice, but it would likely do the job of recording the aftermath of a bingle, for example. And as they say, the best camera is the one you have with you.

    Jazz 2 Jazz 2 iPhone 7 We didn't notice any other screen issues, though the relatively low resolution might be an issue for some. Our pattern of use is probably atypical, but we reckon the battery should be good for a day's moderate use. It is replaceable, so it would be possible to carry a spare if your opportunities for recharging were severely restricted.

    Keep in mind that there are other smartphones at this price point. The Jazz 2 does the basics, and it might be all you need if you're not interested in frills or high performance for the more demanding apps.

    Or it could be the phone you take with you — or give to a family member — when there's an above-average risk of loss or damage.

    Aspera F40 4G Flip Phone

    It's got a very cheap plastic build with absolutely no hint of any kind of water resistance. That wouldn't be a fair expectation for a phone this cheap, but you're also potentially looking at a phone that may break down a fair bit faster than comparable devices simply due to the cheap brittle plastic used in its construction.

    Where it does benefit is in its compact size, as all flip phones tend to. Folded down it'll slip easily into a pocket or purse, and only the blinking external message lights will give its presence away. Aspera calls the silver colour of the Aspera F40's external shell "titanium", although it's contrasted with a direct silver tone on the internal body.

    Aspera rather optimistically refers to the Aspera F40's internal display as "large", but at only 2. There are significant bezels above and below the screen, although the interface is pleasingly "large" within the scope of such a small screen. Underneath the display, you'll find a traditional five-way pad, call, answer and select buttons and a T9-style physical keypad with shortcuts for contacts, SMS messages and the camera functions. All of the Aspera F40's buttons are large and rubbery, with a slight delay when you press them.

    If you're expecting fast response out of a phone of this style, though, you're looking at the wrong phone. One very welcome feature of the Aspera F40 is the inclusion of an SOS button, located on the rear of the phone.

    You have to configure it — my mother incorrectly guessed that it would dial if she pressed it — to send an emergency SOS to a contact of your choosing if calamity prevails.

    Again, though, I'm not the target market, so turning to my mother, I grabbed her impressions about what she liked and didn't like about the Aspera F For her usage, the larger buttons are a definite boon, with the high contrast on the individual keys making a positive impact on her messaging speed.

    Camera 5MP rear camera is awful Can't silence the shutter sound See sample photos and read our full review of the Aspera F40's camera Old school flip phones were around at the very dawn of mobile phone photography, and despite being a handset, the Aspera F40 appears to have borrowed that philosophy when it comes to camera shooting. There's only a single rear-mounted 5MP lens, and while it's conveniently linked to a button on the keypad, it's not fast in any aspect.

    It's slow to launch, it's slow to take pictures and you're only presented with a few simple options when it comes to picture taking. It's also equipped with a very noticeable digital beep when you take any picture at all. While I can appreciate the privacy implications around shutter sounds, there are use cases — photographing a sleeping infant, for example — where being able to silence that sound could be quite useful.

    However, you simply can't. The Aspera F40 struggles to take even rudimentary pictures in good conditions, and this is evident even on its low-resolution display. Pull the photos off the phone and it's even more apparent. Surprisingly, that's not quite so. The Aspera F40 is an Android 9 "Pie" phone, although it's certainly the open-source parts of Android, not a fully-fledged Google device here.

    You're still very much limited to the applications you get on the phone, which include essential messaging services, multimedia playback including FM radio , a calendar and even a rudimentary browser application. Most of these functions are very basic indeed, but again, that's arguably a good match for the target market. I struggled a lot with the keypad-based text entry, and even my mother, who likes keypad-based phones, admits it's a much slower way to manage your messages or enter URLs for the web browser.

    That tiny screen also makes web browsing a terribly laborious process. If you're after a phone that's going to go online, even within the Aspera family, you'd be so much better off with the Aspera Jazz 2. The Android roots underpinning the Aspera F40 won't be readily apparent to its target market either, with a large icon-based interface that makes it very simple to move between what applications are present at will.

    It's a plus for this target market for sure. This does work, but with the caveat that you'll incur data charges and burn through the Aspera F40's battery pretty quickly if you do so. Again, though, I'm not the target market, and my mother provided an excellent use case for the actual buyers of this handset.

    She uses the Aspera F40 to make phone calls, send and receive texts… and that's it. I'm pretty sure that this is going to be the typical profile of most Aspera F40 buyers too. If that's what you want out of a phone, the Aspera F40 won't disappoint.

    Then again, any other phone would do that too. Battery life 1,mAh battery with poor endurance Removable battery continues the retro theme View test results and read our full review of the Aspera F40's battery life Like the Aspera Jazz 2 before it, the Aspera F40 is a phone with a removable battery, although it's not a particularly large battery. At just 1,mAh, it's on the smaller side by any modern battery benchmark, not that the Aspera F40 would actually support benchmarking usage to speak of.

    Also of note is that, like the flip phones of old, the Aspera F40 places the SIM card and microSD storage expansion behind the battery, so if you do need to change them, you have to power the entire phone down.

    Measuring battery life on a flip feature phone is always a tricky feat to manage, so once again I leaned on my mother's lived experience with the Aspera F Her experience using it day to day is that it's capable of a day's battery life before the power depletes, but two days is unlikely. Her usage pattern is very typical of an older phone user with light usage, so if you're a heavy mobile chatter you may find even a day is beyond your scope without recharging.

    For a feature phone — and while this is running Android, it's provisioned as a feature phone with a limited feature set — that's a disappointing result. For that older phone market, that's also a little disappointing, if only because the reversible nature of USB C means that it's easier to quickly plug in without having to check orientation first.

    Should you buy the Aspera F40? A cheap and simple flip phone, but shop around for alternatives There simply aren't that many flip phones on the market, and the chances are good that if you're considering the Aspera F40 it's because it's a form factor that appeals to you.

    It's certainly not overpriced, and the overall experience does reflect that. If you're looking for a more complete smartphone-style experience, there are plenty of alternatives on offer, but within its niche, the Aspera F40 is a fair device, if not exactly an exciting one. It is worth considering your alternatives, however. The Nokia Flip is a somewhat better built flip phone, albeit a slightly more expensive option.

    The Aspera F40 also manages to come in a little cheaper than Telstra's own in-house Telstra Flip 2 handset, but again, it'd be smart to check around for deals on price for either of those handsets. Pricing and availability.

    Now click on your Computer name in the Device Manager window. Now click on Action and then select Add legacy hardware. Add Hardware Wizard window should open, click on Next to continue.

    Now select Install the hardware that I manually select from a list Advanced option and click on Next. Select Show All Devices from the list and click on Next. Click on Browse… and navigate to the folder where you have extracted the drivers in Step 1.

    Confirm the Hardware driver to install and click on Next to begin the installation process. Once installed, click on Finish. Once all the listed drivers are installed, restart your computer. Once the Device Manager loads, click on your Computer name. Now click on Action and then on Add legacy hardware. Talking of the iPhone 7, the Jazz 2 is practically the same width and height as that device.

    In our opinion, around 14cm is as tall as you want a phone to be, otherwise it doesn't fit comfortably in the front pocket of a pair of jeans. The Jazz 2 is significantly thicker than a bare iPhone 7, but there's very little between them once you put the iPhone in a basic protective case.

    There's nothing much wrong with the Jazz 2's appearance as long as you're not expecting a metal frame or a metal or glass back. However, the curved edges and surface finish are slippery to the extent that we dropped it several times during testing — fortunately not from any great height or onto hard surfaces. If you are among the apparent minority who still think a phone is for talking to people, we found the sound quality to be particularly clear in both directions.

    A possible contributor is the way the microphone vent is on the front of the phone rather than the increasingly common placement on the lower edge which we suspect is one of the reasons why we increasingly see people using speakerphone mode — subjecting those around them to both sides of the conversation — with the foot of their phones pointing to their mouths.

    This smartphone was our first experience with Android's Go edition, which — in conjunction with Go edition apps — is supposed to be optimised for lower-performance devices and varying levels of connectivity. We found the Jazz 2 somewhat laggy, to the extent that we initially found ourselves wondering wonder whether touches had actually registered. That caused a few problems for the first day or two until we learned to adopt a slower pace.

    To test the claims about intermittent connectivity, we used Maps Go on the Jazz 2 and the regular version of Maps on another device to navigate the same route. Wireless data was switched off on both phones, and they both performed similarly. So if Go does make a difference in this respect, we didn't notice it. To be clear, to the extent this is a criticism, it is of Go rather than Aspera's handset.

    The Aspera R40 is a rugged phone that won’t break the bank or your heart if it’s lost or destroyed

    I'm pretty sure that this is going to be the typical profile of most Aspera F40 buyers too. If that's what you want out of a phone, the Aspera F40 won't disappoint. Then again, any other phone would do that too. Battery life 1,mAh battery with poor endurance Removable battery continues the retro theme View test results and read our full review of the Aspera F40's battery life Like the Aspera Jazz 2 before it, the Aspera F40 is a phone with a removable battery, although it's not a particularly large battery.

    At just 1,mAh, it's on the smaller side by any modern battery benchmark, not that the Aspera F40 would actually support benchmarking usage to speak of.

    Also of note is that, like the flip phones of old, the Aspera F40 places the SIM card and microSD storage expansion behind the battery, so if you do need to change them, you have to power the entire phone down. Measuring battery life on a flip feature phone is always a tricky feat to manage, so once again I leaned on my mother's lived experience with the Aspera F Her experience using it day to day is that it's capable of a day's battery life before the power depletes, but two days is unlikely.

    Her usage pattern is very typical of an older phone user with light usage, so if you're a heavy mobile chatter you may find even a day is beyond your scope without recharging. For a feature phone — and while this is running Android, it's provisioned as a feature phone with a limited feature set — that's a disappointing result. For that older phone market, that's also a little disappointing, if only because the reversible nature of USB C means that it's easier to quickly plug in without having to check orientation first.

    Should you buy the Aspera F40? A cheap and simple flip phone, but shop around for alternatives There simply aren't that many flip phones on the market, and the chances are good that if you're considering the Aspera F40 it's because it's a form factor that appeals to you.

    Aspera F40 review: Features | Pricing | Specs

    It's certainly not overpriced, and the overall experience does reflect that. If you're looking for a more complete smartphone-style experience, there are plenty of alternatives on offer, but within its niche, the Aspera F40 is a fair device, if not exactly an exciting one.

    It is worth considering your alternatives, however. The Nokia Flip is a somewhat better built flip phone, albeit a slightly more expensive option.


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