Volleyball rotation sheet blank pdf


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    So in the example of the formation, The 5 means there are 5 hitters and the 1 indicates that there is 1 setter on court at all times. In this article I am going to focus solely on the formation and by the end of the article I hope you will leave with everything you need to know about this formation.

    In this article I am going to cover what the formation is, the advantages and disadvantages of this formation over the others and lastly how to stack and rotate when you are the serving team as well as when in serve receive. By the end of this article you will have the rotations down, once you have finished this article head back up here and get your volleyball essentials from Amazon What Is The Volleyball Formation So kicking off the article I want to just go over once more exactly what the formation is and what players you might find in each position.

    So as mentioned above the formation has 5 hitters and only 1 setter. Unlike the other formations this means the setter must set whether they are front court or back court. As you know when teams line up they must be opposite to the other player who plays the same position. For example if the middle blocker is in the middle of the court in the front row, the 2nd middle blocker will also be in the middle of the court but in the back row.

    So obviously as we only have 1 setter in this formation we need to introduce another player to stand opposite the setter. This player coincidentally is actually called the opposite Sometimes referred to as the right side hitter. The opposite as the second name suggests is a player that attacks from the right side of the court. This includes the front court and back court. When in the front row the opposite will attack from position 2 Front right position and when in the back row they will hit the ball from the back court from position 1, this is often known as a 10 ball or 10 attack.

    The players in this formation are as follows: Setter 2no. Outside hitters Opposite Right Side Hitter The is the most commonly used formation across volleyball and is often seen at higher levels of volleyball and is widely used in the professional game.

    Running this formation allows for elaborate players and clever sets like no other. This makes it extremely hard for the opposing team to line up any good blocks or even set up a solid defensive line.

    A team running a well executed can cause a defending team an awful lot of problems. As a hitter knowing that the setter is always at the same tempo and can always hit the sweet spot with their set is a massive confidence boost.

    I feel like this relationship is particularly important between middle hitters and setters. When a middle is running in like the speed of lighting it is so vital that as a setter you know exactly where to put the ball otherwise the middle will have to play a safety shot or maybe even miss the ball completely. In Volleyball there is no better example of this relationship than Bruno and Lucas the Brazilian Internationals Another fantastic advantage that relates to this point is having the same setter allows a team to keep to the same tempo with their play.

    Again this just means that all hitters know almost to the millisecond the timing for their jumps making their attacks a lot more effective.

    When a team finds their rhythm and tempo it can be really difficult to slow them down. Improves Consistency Touching on the above point the hitters become a lot more consistent because they know the timing and speed of the set. This formation also means that all players get a lot of repetitions in their preferred positions.

    This is particularly true for the setter. Unlike the other formations where the setter only sets half the time. This rotation allows the setter to get lots of repetitions which can only lead to good things when it comes to consistency. If you compare this formation to the then it can only be seen as an advantage however it does fall short to the Formation. The advantage I am referring to, is of course the fact that in half of the rotations there are 3 front court hitters.

    Having 3 front court hitters can be very dangerous especially when paired with a good deceptive setter. Couple this with a deceptive setter and you can find the hitters in lots of 1v1 situations which as we know in Volleyball is almost always a guaranteed kill.

    When the setter is back court obviously they want to try and creep forward ready to set the ball on the second touch. The main problem with this is it leaves a weakness in the defense at position 1. As the ball is about to be hit by the attackers if the setter starts creeping forward too early and the opposition spike the ball to position 1 it is going to be very hard to pick up that ball.

    Obviously you will see these in a second when we dive into the diagrams, but unlike both the and the there are actually 6 rotations to learn with this formation. Rotations are often a point of contention for new players anyway so when there is 6 rather than 3 it can be very overwhelming. This is the main reason why this formation is not often seen at the lower level and often saved for more advanced or high level play.

    General Rules of Thumb When Running The in Volleyball All Players Need To Be Ready To Attack I touched on this earlier when I spoke about the advantages but I feel in this formation more than any other it is important that every player is ready to attack the ball whether they are front or back court. This formation remains so effective as there are so many different ways to catch defensive teams out by having attackers hit the ball from different heights, positions and even speed.

    If the ball is hit high and loopy meaning the 6 player has time to take the ball I feel they definitely should step in to allow the setter to get ready to set up the attackers. Obviously if the opposition are swinging hard then the setter will have to stay firm and play defense above all else. Apart from the 6 player covering a bit more ground there is actually something much more clever we can do with the player at position 2 The opposite When we know the opposition are not spiking the ball and it is likely going to be a free ball the setter and opposite can actually quickly swap positions.

    Not only does this prevent the setter taking the first ball and allows them to get in position but it also puts the opposite in a better position to start their attacking approach. Next time your team plays this formation try incorporating this and I promise it will do wonders for the offense.

    Serve Rotations Formation When it comes to starting serving I often like to start with Setter as the first server as this allows the team to have 3 dedicated front row players that will all likely be good blockers. Starting like this also allows the team to have three rotations where there are 3 dedicated front players for attacking.

    Based on the above this is how the team would lineup on court. The setter when back court plays position 1 The back right position. This allows them to have the shortest distance to get their preferred setting position. This may be controversial and your coach may line you up differently but personally when not using a Libero I like to have the Middle Blocker play position 5 Back Left position rather than position 6 Middle Back. Based on This in all these rotations I will show the middle at position 5 and the outside at position 6.

    In the front row we obviously want our outside hitter to be at position 4 Front left , our middle at position 3 Middle front and the opposite or right sided hitter at position 2 Front Right.

    The easiest way to get all players into their preferred positions is by having the middle and outside in the back row to stand next to each other near the middle of the court, ensuring the outside is to the left of the middle and the middle is to the right of the outside to prevent breaking the rules of rotation.

    For the front row we want our outside and opposite to swap sides, as a general rule of thumb we always want our middle blocker to be in the middle and closest to the net, this way they can be ready to block any quick attacks or punish any teams for overpasses. With this in mind we will have our players all stand next to each other up by the net and in the centre.

    This allows the middle to be in position already, the outside will stand to the right of the middle and the opposite will stand just to the left of the middle. The second the ball is served all rotations will take place.

    The opposite who is in the front row needs to swap locations with the middle, however as I said earlier we always want our middle to be in the middle where possible and closest to this net. The way in which we achieve this is by bringing the middle to the centre of the court and placing the opposite just to the left side of the middle ready to run past them to position 2.

    In the back row we have the outside serving and we obviously want to get the setter to position 1 not position 6. This means the setter can simply start in their preferred location at 1 and the outside can serve and walk onto the court in the middle back position. Firstly the middle who is playing back court in position 5 would most likely want to serve from the left side to avoid them having to serve from the right and run across the whole court.

    Regarding the back row we need to get the setter over the other side of the court to position 1. The outside can start at position 6, this allows the setter to move closer to position 1 ensuring they stay to the left of the outside. In the front row we need to swap the outside player and the middle. Again the middle will push towards the centre of the court and stand close to the net ready for any quick attacks.

    This means the outside who must start to the right of the middle will stand just off the shoulder of the middle and run behind them to position 4 as soon as the ball is served. So again the middle and outside will want to swap positions in the back court, this means the middle and outside will stack next to each other near position 6 so once the ball is served the middle can run forwards and left to position 5 leaving the outside next to their position at deep 6.

    In the front row we are back to the rotation where we need to completely flip the lineup. This means the setter needs to get to position 2 and the outside needs to get to position 4. The middle will stand up close to the net in the middle and the setter will stand off their left shoulder with the outside off the middles right shoulder.

    Once the ball is served the outside and setter will swap positions and get ready to block. The outside who is serving will be playing position 6, as they are off the court the opposite can stand directly in their preferred spot at position 1. In the front row the setter and middle need to swap locations. To achieve this the middle will come into the centre of the court to their preferred location meaning the setter who will be just to the left of the middle will need to wait until the serve has taken place and run behind the middle to position 2.

    As mentioned before it makes sense for the middle to serve from the left side of the court so they can walk on straight into their position. In the back row we need the opposite to get over the otherside of the court so they will stand just to the left of the outside in position 6 ready to run over to position 1.

    In the front row we need to get the outside to swap with the middle. By dragging the middle towards the centre of the court and starting them in their preferred position it leaves only the outside with a little run. The outside will stand just to the right of the middle and the second the ball is served they will run into position 4 ready to block.

    There you have it every rotation for when you are the serving team in the formation. I started with the easier rotations and now we are moving on to the more complicated set. A common starting lineup for the a team using this formation that is receiving first would as follows So starting off we have rotation 1, now I will warn you, you are going to see a lot of arrows on these diagrams but hopefully I can help you through them. Opposite the setter we obviously have the opposite, now it is quite common for the opposite to be pushed out of the pass, the main reason for this is to allow the opposite to focus on hitting.

    The opposite also protrolls the back line to let the rest of the team know whether the ball is going in or out. To counter this we actually want to bring the outside hitter who is in position 3 Front Middle back into the passing line. Based on this if we push the middle as far left as we can the outside can actually come back and pass in the opposites position.

    Once the ball has been served and one of our passers who played the ball to the setter the rotations can take place. The middle stood in the top left corner will start wrapping their run towards the middle position ready to hit, the outside will step forward and start heading towards the position that the middle was just standing.

    In the back row the opposite will have to run around the back of all the back court players to position 1 Bottom right to get ready for a back court attack. The 2nd middle in the back row will need to run across the whole court to get to position 5 Bottom Left. The easiest way to get round this is by pulling the outside player currently at position 2 Front right back to the passing line to step in for the setter.

    Just to give a clear view of the serve the middle and opposite will likely stack near the left side of the court to ensure the passers can see clearly. Once the ball has been served in and passed up the setter will run round the outside passing in front of them to their setter base position, the outside who came back to help pass will move outwards towards the right sideline and forwards ready to hit through the right wing.

    In the back row the middle and 2nd outside just simply need to switch positions. This rotation is unlike any other as it is often much easier to leave the opposite hitting through position 4 left wing and the outside hitting through position 2 right wing to prevent complicated position switches. In the middle back position Position 6 the setter is affected by the players either side of them at position 1 and position 5, they are also affected by the player directly in front of them at position 3.

    This is particularly true for the setter. Unlike the other formations where the setter only sets half the time. This rotation allows the setter to get lots of repetitions which can only lead to good things when it comes to consistency. If you compare this formation to the then it can only be seen as an advantage however it does fall short to the Formation.

    The advantage I am referring to, is of course the fact that in half of the rotations there are 3 front court hitters. Having 3 front court hitters can be very dangerous especially when paired with a good deceptive setter.

    Couple this with a deceptive setter and you can find the hitters in lots of 1v1 situations which as we know in Volleyball is almost always a guaranteed kill. When the setter is back court obviously they want to try and creep forward ready to set the ball on the second touch.

    The main problem with this is it leaves a weakness in the defense at position 1. As the ball is about to be hit by the attackers if the setter starts creeping forward too early and the opposition spike the ball to position 1 it is going to be very hard to pick up that ball. Obviously you will see these in a second when we dive into the diagrams, but unlike both the and the there are actually 6 rotations to learn with this formation.

    Rotations are often a point of contention for new players anyway so when there is 6 rather than 3 it can be very overwhelming. This is the main reason why this formation is not often seen at the lower level and often saved for more advanced or high level play. General Rules of Thumb When Running The in Volleyball All Players Need To Be Ready To Attack I touched on this earlier when I spoke about the advantages but I feel in this formation more than any other it is important that every player is ready to attack the ball whether they are front or back court.

    This formation remains so effective as there are so many different ways to catch defensive teams out by having attackers hit the ball from different heights, positions and even speed. If the ball is hit high and loopy meaning the 6 player has time to take the ball I feel they definitely should step in to allow the setter to get ready to set up the attackers. Obviously if the opposition are swinging hard then the setter will have to stay firm and play defense above all else.

    Apart from the 6 player covering a bit more ground there is actually something much more clever we can do with the player at position 2 The opposite When we know the opposition are not spiking the ball and it is likely going to be a free ball the setter and opposite can actually quickly swap positions.

    Not only does this prevent the setter taking the first ball and allows them to get in position but it also puts the opposite in a better position to start their attacking approach. Next time your team plays this formation try incorporating this and I promise it will do wonders for the offense. Serve Rotations Formation When it comes to starting serving I often like to start with Setter as the first server as this allows the team to have 3 dedicated front row players that will all likely be good blockers.

    Starting like this also allows the team to have three rotations where there are 3 dedicated front players for attacking. Based on the above this is how the team would lineup on court.

    The setter when back court plays position 1 The back right position. This allows them to have the shortest distance to get their preferred setting position. This may be controversial and your coach may line you up differently but personally when not using a Libero I like to have the Middle Blocker play position 5 Back Left position rather than position 6 Middle Back. Based on This in all these rotations I will show the middle at position 5 and the outside at position 6.

    In the front row we obviously want our outside hitter to be at position 4 Front leftour middle at position 3 Middle front and the opposite or right sided hitter at position 2 Front Right. The easiest way to get all players into their preferred positions is by having the middle and outside in the back row to stand next to each other near the middle of the court, ensuring the outside is to the left of the middle and the middle is asvab test form 05e the right of the outside to prevent breaking the rules of rotation.

    For the front row we want our outside and opposite to swap sides, as a general rule of thumb we always want our middle blocker to be in the middle and closest to the net, this way they can be ready to block any quick attacks or punish any teams for overpasses.

    With this in mind we will have our players all stand next to each other up by the net and in the centre. This allows the middle to be in position already, the outside will stand to the right of the middle and the opposite will stand just to the left of the middle. The second the ball is served all rotations will take place. The opposite who is in the front row needs to swap locations with the middle, however as I said earlier we always want our middle to be in the middle where possible and closest to this net.

    The way in which we achieve this is by bringing the middle to the centre of the court and placing the opposite just to the left side of the middle ready to run past them to position 2. In the back row we have the outside serving and we obviously want to get the setter to position 1 not position 6. This means the setter can simply start in their preferred location at 1 and the outside can serve and walk onto the court in the middle back position.

    Firstly the middle who is playing back court in position 5 would most likely want to serve from the left side to avoid them having to serve from the right and run across the whole court. Regarding the back row we need to get the setter over the other side of the court to position 1. The outside can start at position 6, this allows the setter to move closer to position 1 ensuring they stay to the left of the outside. In the front row we need to swap the outside player and the middle.

    Again the middle will push towards the centre of the court and stand close to the net ready for any quick attacks. This means the outside who must start to the right of the middle will stand just off the shoulder of the middle and run behind them to position 4 as soon as the ball is served.

    So again the middle and outside will want to swap positions in the back court, this means the middle and outside will stack next to each other near position 6 so once the ball is served the middle can run forwards and left to position 5 leaving the outside next to their position at deep 6.

    In the front row we are back to the rotation where we need to completely flip the lineup.

    5-1 Volleyball Formation & Rotations [With Diagrams]

    This means the setter needs to get to position 2 and the outside needs to get to position 4. The middle will stand up close to the net in the middle and the setter will stand off their left shoulder with the outside off the middles right shoulder. Once the ball is served the outside and setter will swap positions and get ready to block.

    The outside who is serving will be playing position 6, as they are off the court the opposite can stand directly in their preferred spot at position 1. In the front row the setter and middle need to swap locations.

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    To achieve this the middle will come into the centre of the court to their preferred location meaning the setter who will be just to the left of the middle will need to wait until the serve has taken place and run behind the middle to position 2. As mentioned before it makes sense for the middle to serve from the left side of the court so they can walk on straight into their position. In the back row we need the opposite to get over the otherside of the court so they will stand just to the left of the outside in position 6 ready to run over to position 1.

    In the front row we need to get the outside to swap with the middle. By dragging the middle towards the centre of the court and starting them in their preferred position it leaves only the outside with a little run.

    The outside will stand just to the right of the middle and the second the ball is served they will run into position 4 ready to block. There you have it every rotation for when you are the serving team in the formation. I started with the easier rotations and now we are moving on to the more complicated set. A common starting lineup for the a team using this formation that is receiving first would as follows So starting off we have rotation 1, now I will warn you, you are going to see a lot of arrows on these diagrams but hopefully I can help you through them.

    Opposite the setter we obviously have the opposite, now it is quite common for the opposite to be pushed out of the pass, the main reason for this is to allow the opposite to focus on hitting. The opposite also protrolls the back line to let the rest of the team know whether the ball is going in or out.

    To counter this we actually want to bring the outside hitter who is in position 3 Front Middle back into the passing line. Based on this if we push the middle as far left as we can evil crosh commands outside can actually come back and pass in the opposites position. Once the ball has been served and one of our passers who played the ball to the setter the rotations can take place.

    The middle stood in the top left corner will start wrapping their run towards the middle position ready to hit, the outside will step forward and start heading towards the position that the middle was just standing.

    In the back row the opposite will have to run around the back of all the back court players to position 1 Bottom right to get ready for a back court attack. The 2nd middle in the back row will need to run across the whole court to get to position 5 Bottom Left. The easiest way to get round this is by pulling the outside player currently at position 2 Front right back to the passing line to step in for the setter.

    Just to give a clear view of the serve the middle and opposite will likely stack near the left side of the court to ensure the passers can see clearly. Once the ball has been served in and passed up the setter will run round the outside passing in front of them to their setter base position, the outside who came back to help pass will move outwards towards the right sideline and forwards ready to hit through the right wing. In the back row the middle and 2nd outside just simply need to switch positions.

    This rotation is unlike any other as it is often much easier to leave the opposite hitting through position 4 left wing and the outside hitting through position 2 right wing to prevent complicated position switches. In the middle back position Position 6 the setter is affected by the players either side of them at position 1 and position 5, they are also affected by the player directly in front of them at position 3. The better middle is next to the setter and the weaker outside.

    Likewise, the stronger outside is also next to the setter as well as the weaker middle. Further, when the O2 and M2 are both in the front row, the opposite is also in the front row, providing three attackers, rather than just two.

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    For example, if your setter is not a good blocker, you may put your better blocking middle at M1 to create more balance from that perspective. If your middles have similar attacking abilities, then looking at their blocking can be very useful. Serve reception is another way you may try to balance things. I once saw a coaching friend of mine put his strongest outside hitter at O2 rather than O1. When I asked him why he told me it was about passing. In his system the O1 passed in the middle of the formation more often than the O2, but his stronger attacker was not his strongest passer.

    Moving him to O2 reduced his exposure in serve receive, helping to balance things out in that way. Middle leads, or outside leads?

    You will notice in the formation above that the M1 leads the setter in the rotation. Why is the middle leads system generally favored? It comes down to serve receive.

    The system where the outside leads can create some awkward reception formations, and fewer options. The middle leads approach tends to offer more flexibility.


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