New holland kill pen


  • Giving (Us All the Feels) Tuesday
  • Our Animals
  • Dark Horse
  • Horse Rescue
  • Horse Trail Chicks
  • Giving (Us All the Feels) Tuesday

    New Holland auction is notorious among horse lovers chiefly because it is one of the largest sales rings where horses are dumped in some of the most deplorable circumstances imaginable and preyed on by meat man acting on behalf of horse slaughter plants in Canada and Mexico. Anyone with even the slightest knowledge of horse slaughter has heard of New Holland auction.

    The roughly 1, consignors, or sellers, who bring animals to the auction every week come from Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Maine and elsewhere. Jo Parto, a humane police officer with Animal Rescue League of Berks County, said [in ] New Holland gained a reputation in years past because of cruelty cases. They try not to take in the skinny, injured horses. Meat men, also called kill buyers, are typically paid by the pound.

    And if New Holland has cleaned up its act, why are they banning photos and videos? It is pretty apparent to us it is because New Holland auction no longer wants the egregious acts of cruelty committed against the luckless animals who pass through its hands to be exposed and documented. The ones below are cases in point. Lancaster Online reported in November, Animal cruelty officers hope DNA testing will help find the former owner of three mutilated horses found this week at New Holland Sales Stables.

    Someone used a caustic or acidic substance to obliterate identifying tattoos on the inner lips of the thoroughbred horses, according to veterinarian Dr. James Holt, who works for the auction house. News of the Horse reported : In March, , a partially blind horse see below who was shot over times at close range by a paintball gun was found at the New Holland auction. See original story at Lancaster Online. She was treated at New Bolton where she had to have an eye removed, and retired to a sanctuary.

    Sadly, Lily died, peacefully, shortly thereafter. In May, , a horse was dropped off at the sale in terrible condition. When auction workers saw investigators with Animal Angels documenting the condition of the horse, they took the horse to the back, shot him, and dumped him in the trash. Where are the people working for the USDA who reportedly have an office at New Holland auction while these crimes are being committed?

    Share Here.

    Our Animals

    Not an auction for foreclosed homes. Not an auction for priceless art or jewelry or land. I know a thing or two about horses. I spend a significant amount of time with them and can groom them, bathe them, saddle them, walk them, run them on a lead, ride them, feed them, blanket them, work them in a round pen, give them medicine, soak their sore hooves, lift and stretch their hindlegs and forelegs, clean the undersides of their feet, bandage their legs, and minister to their wounds.

    Besides, it was hard to even think at the auction. I took a seat in the large crowd of people — with the Amish men wearing straw hats, black pants, and jackets; with the Mennonite men in their black hats and suspendered pants; with the city slickers from somewhere else and the country folk from nearby; with children and their grandparents fussing over spilled sodas. People talked, laughed, visited, ate hot dogs, Amish pies, and French fries. We all sat sandwiched together in the steep, gray bleachers that formed an oval around the dirt ring in which the horses were shown, one after another, from ten a.

    The fate of those horses that entered and exited the ring quickly — such as one thin copper-colored Thoroughbred mare I remember — seemed bleak, the implication being that the horse was barely worth the time it took to auction off. That particular Thoroughbred mare, whose long, flaxen mane and tail were braided, must have had someone who had cared enough for her to make her pretty, perhaps believing this would help sell her to a good home, where a girl might braid her once again.

    Her head hanging low, she slowly walked around the ring, only once, and then stepped out a side exit. More than once the black-bearded Mennonite man running the auction — someone called him Zimmerman — asked the audience to settle down.

    Given the noisy crowd and the loud, stern voice of the auctioneer calling out in rapid-fire succession the back-and-forth bidding for the animals, I did not expect the saddle horses to try so hard to do well. Horses are flight animals; they flee at the unfamiliar; fear is their dominant emotion.

    But they are social creatures, too. This might possibly be their last chance to perform, and they mustered up that certain nobility and courage possessed by horses, as though they had upon their backs the Navajo of long ago, the warriors who, before battle, would whisper into the ears of their horses: Be brave and nothing will happen. We will come back safely.

    There are approximately 9 million horses in the United States, and at the auction there were two hundred of not necessarily the unwanted but surely the unlucky. Of course, not just KBs attend such auctions. And the horses being sold could have many possible new homes and potential uses — with families who want a trail horse, say, or with horse trainers, or with competitive riders looking for a strong event or endurance horse.

    They were not unwanted. A report quoted by a USDA slaughter statistician for that time period indicated the price of a horse at auction to be around forty-three cents per pound, but horse meat can fetch as much as fifteen dollars per pound in the retail market.

    In a paper concerning horse transport regulations, Stull cites the different types of horse meat various cultures prefer. The Italians, cites Stull, prefer eighteen- to twenty-four-month-old horses; the French go for ten- to twelve-year-old horses; and the Swiss take the two- to three-year-olds. There are currently no horse-slaughtering facilities in the U. In the s there were sixteen slaughterhouses in the U.

    By there were about ten, scattered across the country — in Connecticut, Texas, Oregon, Illinois, Nebraska, and Ohio. By the fall of , the last three — two in Texas and one in Illinois — were shut down by courts that upheld state laws banning horse slaughter.

    The fight against slaughter within the U. Slaughter opponents included the general public seven in ten Americans are against it, according to Madeleine Pickens, former racehorse breeder and wife of billionaire T.

    Slaughter, however, is not banned at the federal level, and individual states that have not banned it could see new slaughterhouses opened in the future.

    In early , a Montana state legislator, aptly named Ed Butcher, tried and failed to lure the Chinese who eat a lot of horses into building a plant there. But Butcher has not given up. This is why slaughter opponents ceaselessly fight for the passage of the Prevention of Equine Cruelty Act of H.

    Kill buyers will be required to provide a signed statement for each horse claiming that to the best of their knowledge the animal has not been treated with these particular substances. It is unlikely that this new hurdle will suddenly stop kill buyers from shipping horses across our borders, as they had been doing even before the last three U.

    The figures for show that horses slaughtered in Canada were sold to as many as twenty-four countries, with France, Switzerland, Japan, and Belgium receiving 92 percent of the exports.

    The demand from countries where horseflesh is considered a pricey delicacy is the predominant reason horses go to slaughter. Some slaughter proponents suggest that the demand is met by horses that are no longer useful to their owners and are therefore better off slaughtered than suffering starvation and neglect. Consider the nearly two hundred mustangs found starving — seventy-four of them already dead — at the Three Strikes Ranch in Nebraska in But he did not.

    It is more often the case that horse owners do not wish their healthy animals an untimely death, are unaware that dealers flip their equines like real estate, and would be horrified to know that their animals had been sold into the slaughter pipeline.

    Bottom line: a horse is a commodity and someone is making money off of it somewhere down the road. And it is all perfectly legal, since horses are deemed livestock by the U.

    Horses in America today are used less for agricultural purposes and more for sport, competition, trail rides, and showing. And the manner in which these horses are killed only makes it more so.

    Before a horse is ostensibly unconscious and hung upside down by one of its back legs, and before its throat is cut and it is bled out, the horse must enter the killbox, or knockbox, where it is shot in the head with a device called a captive bolt gun, which is a four-inch-long, retractable, nail-like instrument.

    The captive bolt gun does not immediately kill the horse but is meant to render it insensible to pain. These conditions are hard to ensure. Vets monitor vitals to cause the least amount of trauma, mental or otherwise. The horse gets hit multiple times with the captive bolt gun. The industry has never been successfully regulated.

    Whoever says otherwise is misrepresenting the history of this industry. But there is not an exchange rate for kindness, while there is one for demand.

    We must deny them the darkness. Video from inside Mexican slaughterhouses reveals horses stabbed repeatedly with knives, which paralyzes the horse but leaves it conscious at the start of the slaughter process. The videos are exceedingly difficult to watch. In response to a Freedom of Information Act request, the USDA recently disclosed some nine hundred pages including photos documenting hundreds of violations of humane treatment to horses during transport to slaughter and at the American plants prior to their closings in The photos available on Kaufmanzoning.

    Late-term pregnant mares, foals, blind horses, and horses who cannot stand on all four legs are not supposed to be sent to slaughter. Those animals that do make the trip are to be fed, watered, and rested.

    Often they are not. The employee who is routinely assigned to work on the kill floor, hanging the horses on the rails, was using a riding crop to whip the horse in the alleyway closest to the knock-box. This horse continued to move backward, away from the knock-box causing the other horses behind it to be overcrowded.

    As the whipping continued the horses in the alleyway became extremely excited. I immediately told the employee to stop but he did not listen to me.

    During this time, the last horse in the alleyway attempted to jump over the alleyway wall and became stuck over the top of the wall. Eventually it had flailed around enough to fall over to the other side of the wall.

    I went to the kill floor to find the plant manager, could not find him. Meanwhile two more horses fell down in the alleyway. The first was the second horse in line to the knock-box. It had fallen forward and the horse behind it began to walk on top of it as the downed horse struggled to get up. The second horse to fall was the fourth horse in line.

    It had flipped over backwards due to the overcrowding and was subsequently trapped and trampled by the fifth and sixth horses in line in their excitement. And in this statement taken from records in Cook County, Illinois, a former slaughterhouse employee testified to the following: In July , they were unloading one of the double-decker trucks. The horse was still living, and it was shaking. Sometimes we would kill near , a day. Each double-decker might have up to on it.

    We would pull off the dead ones with chains. Ones that were down on the truck, we would drag them off with chains and maybe put them in a pen or we might drag them with an automatic chain to the knockbox. Sometimes we would use an electric shocker to make them stand.

    To get them to the knockbox, you have to shock them. When we killed a pregnant mare, we would take the guts out and I would take the bag out and open it and cut the cord and put it in the trash and sometimes the baby would still be living, and its heart would be beating, but we would put it in the trashcan.

    Like many people who start up rescues, Pat was a lifelong rider and horse owner before opening her rescue in When I first visited her on a cold winter afternoon several weeks before the auction, I was led into a paddock of ex-racehorses rescued from nearby tracks.

    But it works out, somehow. We were heading to Pennsylvania to meet a man named Frank, who runs an auction in New Jersey. When a Thoroughbred racehorse reaches the end of its career or is simply no longer profitable on the track, said the HBO trailer, it is often taken directly to auction and sold for meat. When finally I glimpse him at the auction sitting not far from us on a row of bleachers, I notice that he is older than the other KBs; he has white hair, a wide face, blue eyes, and a heather-brown, zip-up cardigan that gives him a rather grandfatherly look.

    It was a secret. You have to show so much identification to get onto the backstretch of a racetrack, where the horses are kept, but you show nothing to get a horse off the track. Those are where the East Coast horses end up. One inventive effort at the Finger Lakes Racetrack involves a transition barn of sorts, called the Purple Haze Center, where horses no longer able to race are retrained and stabled on the grounds of the track until they are adopted.

    It is the first Thoroughbred track in the country to have an in-house adoption program that is run collaboratively between track management and horsemen. But not all horsemen take advantage of groups like CANTER or other rescue options and, apparently, resort instead to unscrupulous practices.

    Russek describes a place not far from New Holland that is run by a Mennonite man. At the request of the manager, the rescue called the KB, who, surprisingly, turned his double-decker around and returned Twilight Overture to Sugarcreek for the rescue. Because if you look at his record, he was in training from track to track to track. What does he think of his life?

    Dark Horse

    In response to a Freedom of Information Act request, the USDA recently disclosed some nine hundred pages including photos documenting hundreds of violations of humane treatment to horses during transport to slaughter and at the American plants prior to their closings in The photos available on Kaufmanzoning. Late-term pregnant mares, foals, blind horses, and horses who cannot stand on all four legs are not supposed to be sent to slaughter. Those animals that do make the trip are to be fed, watered, and rested.

    Often they are not. The employee who is routinely assigned to work on the kill floor, hanging the horses on the rails, was using a riding crop to whip the horse in the alleyway closest to the knock-box. This horse continued to move backward, away from the knock-box causing the other horses behind it to be overcrowded. As the whipping continued the horses in the alleyway became extremely excited. I immediately told the employee to stop but he did not listen to me.

    During this time, the last horse in the alleyway attempted to jump over the alleyway wall and became stuck over the top of the wall. Eventually it had flailed around enough to fall over to the other side of the wall. I went to the kill floor to find the plant manager, could not find him. Meanwhile two more horses fell down in the alleyway. The first was the second horse in line to the knock-box.

    It had fallen forward and the horse behind it began to walk on top seaborn funnel chart it as the downed horse struggled to get up.

    The second horse to fall was the fourth horse in line. It had flipped over backwards due to the overcrowding and was subsequently trapped and trampled by the fifth and sixth horses in line in their excitement.

    And in this statement taken from records in Cook County, Illinois, a former slaughterhouse employee testified to the following: In Julythey were unloading one of the double-decker trucks. The horse was still living, and it was shaking. Sometimes we would kill neara day. Each double-decker might have up to on it. We would pull off the dead ones with chains. Ones that were down on the truck, we would drag them off with chains and maybe put them in a pen or we might drag them with an automatic chain to the knockbox.

    Sometimes we would use an electric shocker to make them stand. To get them to the knockbox, you have to shock them. When we killed a pregnant mare, we would take the guts out and I would take the bag out and open it and cut the cord and put it in the trash and sometimes the baby would still be living, and its heart would be beating, but we would put it in the trashcan.

    Like many people who start up rescues, Pat was a lifelong rider and horse owner before opening her rescue in When I first visited her on a cold winter afternoon several weeks before the auction, I was led into a paddock of ex-racehorses rescued from nearby tracks. But it works out, somehow.

    We were heading to Pennsylvania to meet a man named Frank, who runs an auction in New Jersey. When a Thoroughbred racehorse reaches the end of its career or is simply no longer profitable on the track, said the HBO trailer, it is often taken directly to auction and sold for meat. When finally I glimpse him at the auction sitting not far from us on a row of bleachers, I notice that he is older than the other KBs; he has white hair, a wide face, blue eyes, and a heather-brown, zip-up cardigan that gives him a rather grandfatherly look.

    It was a secret. You have to show so much identification to get onto the backstretch of a racetrack, where the horses are kept, but you show nothing to get a horse off the track. Those are where the East Coast horses end up.

    Horse Rescue

    One inventive effort at the Finger Lakes Racetrack involves a transition barn of sorts, called the Purple Haze Center, where horses no longer able to race are retrained and stabled on the grounds of the track until they are adopted.

    It is the first Thoroughbred track in the country to have an in-house adoption program that is run collaboratively between track management and horsemen. But not all horsemen take advantage of groups like CANTER or other rescue options and, apparently, resort instead to unscrupulous practices.

    Russek describes a place not far from New Holland that is run by a Mennonite man. At the request of the manager, the rescue called the KB, who, surprisingly, turned his double-decker around and returned Twilight Overture to Sugarcreek for the rescue.

    Because if you look at his record, he was in training from track to track to track. What does he think of his life? He was shipped every two weeks somewhere. His story epitomizes that slaughter is a convenient disposal system. This horse is very usable. Why would a trainer kill this horse, my horse? Because they want the bucks they get for him from the kill buyer. Yeah, right. And I need it now. This is their battle — to save horses — and the computer is both their weapon and their battlefield.

    Pat pulls up photos of two of the Mountaineer Park horses in immediate need. One is a chestnut named Nitro, the other a black horse named I Gotta Go. Seeing their photos makes them real; and I am reminded that, as another Triple Crown season winds down — that time of year when Americans watch the fastest of the fast run their million-dollar races — thousands of the lesser-known Thoroughbreds like Nitro and I Gotta Go await their fate, having not only never made it to national television, but potentially never making it out of racing alive.

    All of this sheds light on — but in the end proves nothing about — how a tall, slender, dapple-gray Thoroughbred gelding that had raced at Suffolk Downs in Boston and at Tampa Downs in Florida ended up at New Holland the morning I was there, still wearing his racing plates and standing quietly in front of me, roped to a post against a concrete wall. He already had been claimed by a KB, whom Pat would have to find and then pay more than he had paid for the gelding if she wanted to take the horse home.

    About a month later, I will call this kill buyer to inquire about the dapple-gray gelding. Where had the horse come from? The KB will inform me, rather politely at first, that he is on the road with the rig and cannot give me any phone numbers. As I ask again about the journey of the dapple-gray, I picture this KB standing ringside at the auction, closest to the horses entering, along with the other KBs, all Caucasian, most in their midforties, wearing baseball caps, slouchy jackets like high-school football players, jeans, and colorful studded leather belts.

    Soon enough he tires of my questions. When I called on Sunday morning to confirm our arrangements, Pat was hammering nails into plywood with a retired neighbor who volunteers. Later that afternoon, though, Pat called back to say that the pregnant mare had been inadvertently sent off on the slaughter truck a few days earlier.

    It was not clear how this had happened. Probably, said Pat, she was already dead. At the auction, Pat leaves the bleachers frequently to track down Thoroughbreds, and while she is away, quite a few of them stream in and out of the noisy bidding ring, along with other breeds, too many to list, all in and out so fast it is hard to keep track of the numbers and prices.

    On her way out, Mennonite boys whip her repeatedly in the face. They have been worked until they literally cannot stand any longer. No matter that the animal has slaved.

    Just as a broken plow would be sold to the junk man for the metal, these broken animals are sold to the kill-man for meat. Standing so close to so many of them, looking into their faces, rubbing their bodies, listening to them eat hay, watching them watch us, I realize the emotional blackmail of the moment.

    There is the wish to save them all, knowing full well no one can, and that by tonight many of them will be heading to Canada, or to feedlots to be fattened up for a slaughterhouse in Canada. To the extent that one can, Pat has crossed this threshold, and her time 33kv cable size the barn is more goal-directed: She weaves through the lines of animals to find the Thoroughbreds.

    Racehorses are required to have a tattoo inside their upper lip, which identifies the horse and links it to its registration papers. Soon enough she is off with a list of tattoos to call in to a contact waiting to help identify the racetracks to which the Thoroughbreds were last connected.

    Horse Trail Chicks

    Pat hurries back to say she has the dapple-gray racehorse. She is led to stand near the fence by the kill buyers. Her eyes look up into the bleachers, her skin twitches when someone touches her, and the bidding begins. Zimmerman, the bearded Mennonite, looks up to me.

    I am new here, and I sense at that moment he knows it. Overhorses get shipped to Canada or Mexico from the US every year. These horses are slaughtered for meat and sent to countries like Belgium, France and Japan. Japan also imports live horses to be slaughtered fresh.

    Many horses come from the thoroughbred and quarter horse race tracks, and many are victims of overbreeding and a lack of funds to take care of horses both old and young.

    The majority of horses that ship to slaughter are not old, and many are sound. Horses, like dogs and cats, also fall prey to financial issues of their owners, especially because horses live well into their 20s and 30s now. What is your equestrian background, and what prompted you to start Rising Starr?

    I have been teaching and training horses and riders for over 30 years. InI stepped away from the national show world to raise a family and teach children. My goal was to teach the joy, as well as the reality and responsibility, of horse ownership. Prior to starting my small facility, Moonlight Farm, I had a stall farm in Greenwich, CT, and was busy with the major horse show circuit, as well as riding programs for Greenwich Day School, Greenwich Academy, and Brunswick Schools.

    InI was looking for school horses and met Bigg Bert. At that time, I had no idea what New Holland Sales was a kill hub and auction house for the northeast. But I soon learned. Bert was from New Holland Sales and has been the most influential horse in my life. The kindness, patience and compassion Bert brought to humans was immeasurable, and yet someone threw him out like trash. That experience and a bunch of kids prompted me to start RSHR. What is the Rising Starr mission statement? Rising Starr Horse Rescue saves, rehabilitates, retrains and rehomes abandoned, neglected or abused horses, and educates about at-risk horses and the importance of protecting them.

    Where do your horses come from, and what is the typical timeline from the day you receive a horse to the day it leaves Rising Starr? We get horses directly from kill pens, auctions, surrenders, and from people with big hearts who get horses from kill pens but are not equipped to handle the quarantine and rehabilitation part. Here, horses are quarantined for 6 to 8 weeks. If the horse is healthy in body, we will start work on the ground right away. The ground work gives us an idea about what second career might fit the horse, and we try to expose our rescues to many different situations.

    Once we have an idea of what might best fit the horse, we design a custom training program and share that the horse is available. The entire process can take 8 weeks to 8 months, and depends on the physical and mental condition of the horse.

    We have gotten several horses that have never had a halter on, and we have adopted horses to The Metropolitan Equestrian Team and Access Equine. We have had horses adopted all over the tri-state area, and even in Ipv6 subnet mask. How long has Rising Starr been open, how many horses has it saved, and how many does it typically bring in and re-home each year?

    Many of these volunteers are now on our youth board new in We have rescued 26 horses. We currently have 6 horses that are our program horses, including one mare that came out of a kill pen with a brand-new colt at her side.

    We had hoped to start her but many kill pens put stallions in with mares and foals, and she is now pregnant. We have homed 19 horses since our first adoption in August of did I mention we were only going to do one horse at a time!?

    We did just get one of our adopted horses back, as she did not like her new job, but we will find the right place for her. As of today, we have one pending adoption and 2 available. What is the most difficult part of your job as a rescue operator? Having to make the decision to euthanize a young horse due to human neglect. We rescue them but cannot always save them.

    I just had a beautiful year-old quarter horse mare euthanized after less than 36 hours at the rescue. Saying no because we do not have funds or room is a close second.


    thoughts on “New holland kill pen

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *