Born during a storm meaning


  • Rainbow Baby: What It Means and Why Rainbow Babies Are Beautiful
  • 'Storm babies': The fascinating reason so many women go into labour during a storm.
  • How the Month You Were Born Affects Your Personality, According to Science
  • Cyclone Yaas: How this monster storm got its unique name, identity
  • What Are Storms?
  • 60 Baby Names that Mean Storm, Wind, Lightning, Air, Rain, Cloud Or Sky
  • Rainbow Baby: What It Means and Why Rainbow Babies Are Beautiful

    My mother was a pharmacist, but with four children, having a family and a separate job was a handful. So, we kids started going to the office to be with them every day after school.

    Our training started there. For most of that time, I was assigned to different urgent care centers around the main island. My husband and I lived in the town of Carolina, but I had to travel to wherever they needed a doctor. It was a very hectic life for me. Six years ago, when I was pregnant with my second child, we had the opportunity to move to Culebra. And there are only 1, people who live on this island full time. Everybody knows each other here—maybe not by name, but you know who they are, where they live, where they work, or what they do.

    I really wanted a quieter, more stable place for us. After we moved here, though, I got divorced. The kids are so close to me that I can just walk two minutes and stop in to say hi. Culebra is not for everyone, though.

    If the other doctor leaves, the nurse has to run to my house and knock on my window. Usually all of our emergency patients are evacuated to the main island. If we hear that there might be tropical storms or hurricane weather, we take precautions and evacuate all patients who need special care, along with the pregnant women who are near their due date. For the past 12 years, no baby has been born on Culebra. Like something was in the walls howling at us. It arrived as a Category Five hurricane and took down all of our trees and most of our houses, which were mainly wooden and went down easily.

    Some people here had tractors, though, and neighbors were helping neighbors. They were gathering up all these broken house pieces, appliances, furniture, trees, debris, or just plain garbage and piling it all up for eventual removal. All those same feelings of desperation are inside me still.

    The emergency room generator also broke down during Irma and nobody could turn it back on. Everyone tried—staff, police, fire, well-meaning friends—but it was dead.

    There was another generator on the clinic side that was working, and we were running extension cords from the clinic to the cardiac area of urgent care so that we could at least have the resuscitation equipment available for emergencies. This was an office building with small rooms, but we had no other choice, so we marked off some of the offices to be a makeshift emergency room.

    It was better than nothing, but we kept having to go back and forth across the parking lot to the old urgent care for supplies. For a long time after the hurricane, there was no electricity, the public schools were closed, transportation was next to impossible, and there was no communication. There is no potable water on Culebra, and we have only a few family farms, so all our supplies had to be flown in, too.

    In those days, we kept one nurse with me on each shift. What do you want to do? I have a list of the pregnant women on Culebra for evacuation purposes. And we had evacuated all the people who were at least eight months pregnant, near their due date. I called each of these women personally and we provided transportation to the main island for them and their families.

    But this person, Neysha, was not called because she was only seven months pregnant and showed no signs of any high risk. She was nowhere near her due date and not having any problems. We met and she began to describe her pain, but while she was talking, she kept pausing, putting her hands to her side with a distressed look on her face, and it looked like she might be having contractions.

    And what she was describing sounded a lot like labor pain. I started thinking to myself, Dear God, this cannot be possible. I was growing concerned because I knew there was absolutely no possibility for me to evacuate her. But when I brought her back to our makeshift exam room and proceeded to examine her, I found that she was ready. We need to get the stretcher.

    And the room we were in is not that big. The circumstances were too grim. This baby was coming, and it was coming now. It wanted out! There was nothing I could do. This was my first birth since medical school. This baby was coming under very poor conditions—with no access to special equipment, no transportation, and no possible communication with an obstetrician. In order to use it, you have to go outside, point it at the right angle to pick up a signal, and then hope that there are no clouds to interrupt the signal.

    So, there was no way to use the phone and deliver the baby. No way that someone could guide me through the birth. We looked at those teeny feet and we were scared, but we had no choice and just had to proceed.

    When the baby started to come, what we saw were toes and not a head. This baby was coming breech, which means that the legs are coming first and not the head. This is not typical. Usually when a baby is carried to term, it turns on its own so that the head is downside and the first thing that will come through the vaginal canal will be the face.

    There was no way we could know if the baby was even still alive. The nurse and I looked at each other; we were communicating our concern with our eyes, knowing that this birth would be chancy. In the beginning, Neysha was doing fine. Most of the baby was out—we could see it was a boy—and she was pushing.

    She was relaxed, but very tired and just wanted to sleep. He was stuck at the shoulders and his head was still inside of her, and we were worried. I thought about God and asked him to use my hands. Can you push one last time? Really hard.

    She shook her head, no. She was giving me the sign that she thought the baby was dead. It was cyanotic. The baby was blue. With my right hand, I searched his little body and prayed to God, until I felt a beating heart. I told Neysha again that everything would be fine.

    She still had work to do and needed to be calm. He came out all at once in a rush, smoothly. And he was alive. He cried right away, as soon as he was free. His coloration quickly came back to normal and everything was perfect after all. We placed the baby in an incubator that we powered by generator. He was two months early, but he was alive! And then I started to try to find help to transfer Neysha and her newborn to the main island. By protocol, both needed to be in the hospital. But it was almost impossible to contact any planes or hospitals.

    The health department had given us a satellite phone maybe five years before I even arrived on Culebra, but no one on the staff was told how to maintain it. It has a chip in it that expires yearly. When I was finally able to get through to the hospital, I learned that transportation by their helicopter was out of the question. The air ambulance has many specifications for flying.

    It was raining hard, so the conditions were too dangerous. We have a newborn baby that needs to go to the hospital immediately! Help stopped coming. Since I was the only doctor on the island throughout that whole time, all patients were my responsibility 24 hours a day. We had injuries from the hurricane that were never tended to and then new injuries from the cleanup. We saw so many skin infections in those days.

    And that was all on top of the regular things like refilling prescriptions and tending to our patients with chronic conditions. It was hard to be on duty for so many consecutive hours. At first, the police boat would bring him from San Juan to work with me in the clinic, then he used the ferry when it started running again. Today, the clinic is rebuilt, and it even has a permanent roof. And I told that to everyone from the government who came to inspect our clinic.

    Maybe one day.

    'Storm babies': The fascinating reason so many women go into labour during a storm.

    Last Updated on April 5, Once the baby is born, the next milestone for the parent is to give the baby a beautiful name that has a deep meaning. Let us help you guys select a lovely and unique name that is associated with weather. The most difficult part of choosing a name for your baby is that there are a lot of friends and relatives who would have their suggestions while naming a baby.

    It is very important to remember that the name will be carried by the child for the rest of their life. As we battle through all the seasons from sunny to rainy and from windy to shivery winters, it is not surprising that we always keep talking about weather conditions. Then why not take advantage and choose names that have to do with weather.

    Here is the list of some beautiful names to choose from. Here is a list of the most popular and trendy weather-inspired names for baby boys to choose from. The name denotes a pleasant atmosphere. Akash Akash is a very popular name of Indian origin. It is one of the most popular boy names in India. Barak The given name Barak is a Hebrew name also spelled as Baraq.

    Barak is a unique name that means lightning. It is a popular and evergreen name chosen by many to add a personality to their child. Dalfon A highly unusual weather name with a distinctive sound, Dalfon is of Hebrew origin. Ermir Every parent searches for a cool, unique name for their child.

    Freyr The short and unusual baby name has a Norse origin. Gale A pleasant name Gale is a Hebrew baby name of English origin. It refers to the sea storm. This is one of the best names in the list of names which means weather. It is one of the most attractive Scottish names. Hadad Hadad is a Biblical baby name for boys. This name is Hebrew in origin. Hadad was the Akkadian God of rain and storms. A perfect pick of the name for parents who want a name that bridges cultures.

    It is very popular in the Middle East and South Asian cultures. Neil The short and sweet baby boy named Neil is of Gaelic origin. Raiden Raiden is a very unique and trendy baby name. This name is of Scandinavian origin. The name also refers to heaven. An individual with such name is expected to shine throughout their life with his warm nature. It is one of the most popular and modern names. Stormy Stormy is a name considered by those parents who are looking out for unisex names for their babies.

    Tal The name Tal is inspired by the rain and it is of Hebrew origin. Thor was the Norse God of strength, thunder, war, and storms. Wyndham The name Wyndham is a rare baby boy name of Old English origin. This name is perfect for the parents who are looking for boy names that mean wind. This name is pronounced as Zeh-roo. Baby Names Inspired By Weather for Girls Here are some weather baby names for girls you may want to consider before naming your little darling.

    Aurora was the Roman Goddess of sunrise. Autumn Autumn is a weather-inspired name of Latin origin. Alya The name Alya is a short and sweet name for a baby girl. It is one of the most popular girl names that mean air.

    How the Month You Were Born Affects Your Personality, According to Science

    Culebra is not for everyone, though. If the other doctor leaves, the nurse has to run to my house and knock on my window. Usually all of our emergency patients are evacuated to the main island. If we hear that there might be tropical storms or hurricane weather, we take precautions and evacuate all patients who need special care, along with the pregnant women who are near their due date.

    For the past 12 years, no baby has been born on Culebra. Like something was in the walls howling at us. It arrived as a Category Five hurricane and took down all of our trees and most of our houses, which were mainly wooden and went down easily. Some people here had tractors, though, and neighbors were helping neighbors. They were gathering up all these broken house pieces, appliances, furniture, trees, debris, or just plain garbage and piling it all up for eventual removal.

    All those same feelings of desperation are inside me still. The emergency room generator also broke down during Irma and nobody could turn it back on. Everyone tried—staff, police, fire, well-meaning friends—but it was dead. There was another generator on the clinic side that was working, and we were running extension cords from the clinic to the cardiac area of urgent care so that we could at least have the resuscitation equipment available for emergencies.

    This was an office building with small rooms, but we had no other choice, so we marked off some of the offices to be a makeshift emergency room.

    Cyclone Yaas: How this monster storm got its unique name, identity

    It was better than nothing, but we kept having to go back and forth across the parking lot to the old urgent care for supplies. For a long time after the hurricane, there was no electricity, the public schools were closed, transportation was next to impossible, and there was no communication. There is no potable water on Culebra, and we have only a few family farms, so all our supplies had to be flown in, too.

    In those days, we kept one nurse with me on each shift. What do you want to do? I have a list of the pregnant women on Culebra for evacuation purposes. And we had evacuated all the people who were at least eight months pregnant, near their due date. I called each of these women personally and we provided transportation to the main island for them and their families.

    But this person, Neysha, was not called because she was only seven months pregnant and showed no signs of any high risk. She was nowhere near her due date and not having any problems. We met and she began to describe her pain, but while she was talking, she kept pausing, putting her hands to her side with a distressed look on her face, and it looked like she might be having contractions.

    And what she was describing sounded a lot like labor pain. I started thinking to myself, Dear God, this cannot be possible. I was growing concerned because I knew there was absolutely no possibility for me to evacuate her.

    But when I brought her back to our makeshift exam room and proceeded to examine her, I found that she was ready.

    We need to get the stretcher. And the room we were in is not that big. The circumstances were too grim. This baby was coming, and it was coming now. It wanted out! There was nothing I could do. This was my first birth since medical school. This baby was coming under very poor conditions—with no access to special equipment, no transportation, and no possible communication with an obstetrician. In order to use it, you have to go outside, point it at the right angle to pick up a signal, and then hope that there are no clouds to interrupt the signal.

    What Are Storms?

    So, there was no way to use the phone and deliver the baby. No way that someone could guide me through the birth. We looked at those teeny feet and we were scared, but we had no choice and just had to proceed. When the baby started to come, what we saw were toes and not a head. This baby was coming breech, which means that the legs are coming first and not the head. This is not typical. Usually when a baby is carried to term, it turns on its own so that the head is downside and the first thing that will come through the vaginal canal will be the face.

    There was no way we could know if the baby was even still alive.

    60 Baby Names that Mean Storm, Wind, Lightning, Air, Rain, Cloud Or Sky

    The nurse and I looked at each other; we were communicating our concern with our eyes, knowing that this birth would be chancy. In the beginning, Neysha was doing fine. Most of the baby was out—we could see it was a boy—and she was pushing. Just last year, we lost our beloved baby Cara at 23 weeks of pregnancy.

    The days, weeks, and months after she became our angel baby were the darkest of my life. But soon a dim hope flickered inside my heart, and eventually ignited a flame, that became my desire to try again, in part to honor Cara, and to find meaning in her loss. She lost her son Niko when he was five months old due to complications related to his premature birth.

    Not only is this mama involved in fighting prematurity, but she was also inspired to conceive a rainbow baby. Not that she previously knew the meaning of the term "rainbow baby.

    I so much wanted to make sure that Niko wasn't forgotten, and the term so eloquently acknowledges the babies who we've lost, while also celebrating the joy of our babies who do survive.

    Whenever things get hard—feeding challenges, sleeping challenges, mild illnesses—we always make it a point to step back and remember that things could be so much worse. She too acknowledges that parenting her rainbow baby will be different, telling Parents. He will truly be the light at the end of the tunnel, the pot of gold under the rainbow, and the rainbow after our storm.

    Morning sickness and heartburn can't take away my gratitude for the chance to carry a healthy baby. Elizabeth Lorde-Rollins, M. Kulp-Makarov cautions, "The birth and newborn stage of a rainbow baby are different for parents who have suffered a loss.


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