Qgd


  • QNAP QGD-3014-PT Review – NAS? NVR? Switch? Why Not All Three!
  • QGD 40 125 PSI Air Compressor (NEW)
  • Our SwitchNAServer or QNAP QGD-1600P Review
  • Magnus Carlsen and Ian Nepomniach aim for chess crown this week
  • LodenDahGrafix
  • QGD Exchange : The f3-e4 plan
  • QNAP QGD-3014-PT Review – NAS? NVR? Switch? Why Not All Three!

    Warranty Information Warranty Extension Documentation The warranty on the QGDPT is 2 years and although I would have liked this device to feature the 3-years hardware warranty that similarly hardware called NAS systems feature, it is worth highlighting that this warranty can be extended within the first 60 days of its purchase.

    These and the metal drive tray keys are tiny inclusions it must be said, but still a welcome extra in terms of quality and often absent on a number of other rival NAS brand accessory kits at this price point.

    Overall, the retail kit of the QGDPT is a little dull but certainly everything that you will need. Much like any other managed switch, the QGDPT does not feature additional ethernet cables for all 16 network ports. As already mentioned, the system is significantly more compact than I thought it would be and that is most certainly a good thing, especially when one of the chief benefits of a combined NAS and switch is the potential space-saving and streamlined setup.

    Likewise, the system is quite understated and discreet, which allows you to deploy this device with little-to-no hardware environment issues. The QGDPT is certainly designed with a more discreet deployment in mind, which is not necessarily a bad thing.

    The LCD, of course, is not the only means with which the system can notify an end-user with system activity and much like any other known as or switch system, it also features a myriad of LEDs and standard indicators on the front panel denoting activity.

    The left-hand side of the front panel is occupied by the 4 SATA storage bays included in the QGDPT system and its cover can be removed easily with the side locking mechanism that removes the semi-transparent front panel. Inside we find full metal trays that are key locked individually, as well as being individually ventilated. Of course, you do not need to fully populate the QGDPT device and can simply occupy as little as one bay to utilise this device immediately.

    These are not click and load drives, so you will need a screwdriver, but this does still add to remarkably robust and sturdy design quality in the QGDPT.

    On the other side of the front panel of the QGDPT we find a large block area of ventilation that presumably works in conjunction with the active internal cooling found on the rear and on the main PCB inside. Similar to that found in the TVS-x82 and TVS-x88X series, this seemingly results in better circular air movement throughout the device when it is in operation and even the lowest powered PoE switches generally can generation a noticeable degree of heat, so this extra few steps in cooling will be necessary.

    Either side of the external chassis features additional passive cooling vents and although the base of the QGDPT does not have any further holes, there is still a tremendous coverage of ventilation throughout the entire chassis. The base of this desktop chassis is fairly non-descript and features four rubberized feet to eliminate further vibration from the surface of wherever you deploy the device.

    It is pretty unique in comparison to other devices and although it is a tad angular in its shape, it is actually quite a compact and well-contained framework to house BOTH a NAS and a 16 port switch.

    But, it is the rear ports and connections of the device that needs our attention next. With the NAS dedicated connections kept parallel to the switch hardware, it is easy to see which belongs to what. This is a single system that is combining the architecture of two very devices that are typically very, very different in physical build.

    For the most part, it completely succeeds in this. Almost half of the entire rear panel is dominated by a single cooling fan, measuring 12cm x 12cm, that facilitates cool air through the device in conjunction with all those passive cooling vents, drawing air over the hard drive bays, the internal PCBs, heatsinks and PSU.

    The RPM od this single fan can be adjusted to lower the humming noise when in operation, but it is best to leave it to automatically adjust the RPM as needed based on internet temp checks , especially in the case of a NAS that is also accompanied by 16 PoE equipped RJ45 ports!

    The PSU featured on the QGDPT is W, which is shared by both the NAS and switch elements of this device although individual system shutdown, reset or reboot can be operated independently on either hardware component. Likewise, there is the fact that this PSU is not easily removed and in the event of a PSU replacement, you will most likely need to send the whole unit back to QNAP for your warranty repair.

    You can always look into options, such as a UPS onsite, but it is surprising that the PSU on the QGDPT is not backed up by a redundant 2nd module, or is much more easily removed on the fly both as found on a rackmount solution. Certainly, not a deal-breaker and there are ways and means, but this is certainly a concern for a few users who have been bitten by a failed PSU before.

    So the fact you are getting all this AND the 16 port PoE managed switch functionality too is pretty impressive. That is a HUGE degree of connectivity. Along with all of these direct client-host level connections, it is also worth highlighting that the system also supports a wide range of USB devices on the system too. These ports can also be used by the end-user when assigned to virtual machines, for UPS devices to ensure safe shutdowns or continued use in the event of a power failure — you can even connect a USB Webcam and then add it as a local camera to your QVR Pro surveillance array.

    Some might wish that it featured the USB 3. These can then be accessible by the system GUI, as well as individual applications Virtual Machine software, HD Sation applications, playback in multimedia applications, surveillance 2-way use and more. Audio sockets on NAS is not a new thing and QNAP integrated it in a number of their earlier desktop models over the years, but in the QGDPT it makes alot more sense in terms of standalone deployment of a number of QTS software and services Finally, we find the twin reset pinholes.

    So, you can see alot of the connectivity and utility of the QGDPT and, with the exception of the lack of 10Gbe, I think its a pretty solid arsenal. Once these were removed, I was able to get a good look at the partitioning of the QGDPTs system internally and how the switch and NAS hardware architecture is separated effectively. The framework is very, very clean and clear. Plenty of airflow around the compartments and the PSU is surrounded by the storage bays and main controller board. The board is a micro board that contains everything you would expect from a modern NAS layout.

    This is very unusual for a NAS system, that will typically avoid internal active cooling beyond rear cooling fans. It is a quad-core, x86 processor that features a 2. This CPU has embedded graphics UHD that will be hugely useful in graphical software Virtual machines, surveillance feeds, transcoding, etc and generally more render related data tasks videos, images, etc and supports both p and 4K media playback.

    This is impressive, given that most systems at this hardware point would arrive with 4GB almost always. Another interesting inclusion is the two m. A common feature in a number of recent NAS releases, it is still very welcome in this combination device where the amount of internal hardware available would be arguable more limited due to constraints of CPU lanes and chipset. Alternatively, you can use these bays for creating an additional storage pool and volumes — just as you would with the HDD storage bays.

    The entire device runs on the QTS Linux platform, but from there you can create a completely unique and bespoke environment. The initial advantages are pretty obvious. For a start, having a single device performing the functionality of two devices will save physical space, it will utilize less power overall whilst in operation and will simplify the control of both, whilst still maintaining security and safety in access.

    However, other less obvious advantages are more to do with moving the evolution and innovation of NAS over recent years and moving that over to the network switch architecture. Most switches arrive with rather techie-heavy dialogue and a steep learning curve, making them considerable intimidating to non-IT professionals.

    Finally, the big guns! Not only can all the cameras be connected effectively directly to the NAS, but the easy-anywhere access of the NAS still with encryption, https, VPN and other services available ports over very well and usably in surveillance. Finally, thanks to the QNAP QVR Pro platform and the 8 camera licenses included, you have a full CCTV system that can be accessed over the network, internet or locally with a keyboard, monitor and mouse KVM support and has a complete dashboard to view your IP cameras, each with their own settings, permissions, triggers and control.

    You even get 8 camera licenses included for the software, 4 times that of their nearest rival. The most obvious disadvantage is that you are putting two eggs in one basket, meaning that if the system dies, you lose access to both your NAS and your Network Switch. Although I have already touched on this, it is a valid concern and is definitely going to be a concern for those who wrap their whole business around a single switch that connects to the internet.

    However, for me personally, the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages in the long run and can easily be resolved with even a low priced UPS. This is where you can install virtual machine environments in the switch side of the device.

    You can select the VM installation directory and space allocation that you want to provide to this VM.

    Once the initial steps are complete, you can move into a more bespoke setup for you. It is the user interface of the switch and is very similar in design to the majority of core system QNAP applications. For those unfamiliar with the QNAP operating system, it arrives with hundreds of free applications, can be accessed from a web browser or desktop client, arrives with many, many apps for mobile on IOS and Android and is definitely in the top two operating systems you can get for network-attached storage devices.

    All scheduled and all accessible via a single app user interface. Supporting Windows, Linux, Android and more. It can make recommendations to beef up your security and keep you safe Ultimately, all this means that in BOTH the NAS software and the Switch software, the QGDPT gives you a completely uncompromised system with which to work — despite them housed inside a single chassis.

    I have to give them props for that. Yes, the QGDPT is not without its small compromises lack of a PCIe upgrade slot, a 10Gbe NIC or a redundant PSU , but what you have is a fantastically centralized solution to those that are looking for a single device that can resolve three of the biggest concerns of a modern business — Storage, Access and Security.

    When I first reviewed the first generation of this technology back in the QGDp Guardian I commented that as interesting and innovative as I thought it was, that it was a mid-range switch and a mid-range NAS in a single chassis.

    QGD 40 125 PSI Air Compressor (NEW)

    Using a software solution to add Layer 3 functionality means that one is limited by the CPU. That is also important because if one is thinking of using the PCIe slots for 10GbE expansion, remember that that is going through the CPU to the switch. Power Consumption and Noise For a device such as this one, power consumption and noise can be a major consideration. That is likely closer to a lower boundary as one can use the PCIe Gen2 x2 slots for expansion, as well as the USB ports which would add power.

    Since this is a PoE switch, there is one component which is the unit itself, but the other big one is the power available to deliver to other devices. Most likely, the power consumption of this device will be most impacted by the PoE devices you are utilizing. On the noise front, despite being a 30W at idle switch, it is fairly loud. That all comes down to the delta PSU fan as the other two fans are reasonably quiet. We thought it may be quiet given the low power CPU and the fact it came with rubber feet.

    It was louder than our workstations to the point neither of us wanted it within 3 meters of our work area. At the same time, we cannot recommend this in an inhabited workplace. It is frankly not the best PoE switch on the market. On the switch side, one gets a Layer 2 1GbE port switch. For many, the internal SATA bays are going to be enough. For even light-duty file sharing tasks this works well. All of this, of course, a reasonable trade-off given that this also has the PoE switch function.

    It is focused on low power operation. We do not get ECC memory in the unit which is a feature many will want to see in servers. Still, for a lower-cost edge server, this is a solid solution. One can run containers along with VMs on the SwitchNAServer which can be handy if it means not adding another box to a location.

    Many applications QNAP already has a library for, however, if you have something more custom you want to run, then this works well. Conceptually, the idea of unifying all of these common edge machines into a single short-depth 1U box is a great one and one we hope QNAP continues to innovate on. There are going to be readers that will see this solution and think it is not for them. That is fine. On the other hand, there is going to be a subset of our readers that are going to look at the SwitchNAServer and see a world of possibilities to deliver better services to their clients.

    For that subset, the SwitchNAServer is going to be a game-changer.

    We do not get ECC memory in the unit which is a feature many will want to see in servers. Still, for a lower-cost edge server, this is a solid solution. One can run containers along with VMs on the SwitchNAServer which can be handy if it means not adding another box to a location. Many applications QNAP already has a library for, however, if you have something more custom you want to run, then this works well. Conceptually, the idea of unifying all of these common edge machines into a single short-depth 1U box is a great one and one we hope QNAP continues to innovate on.

    There are going to be readers that will see this solution and think it is not for them. That is fine. On the other hand, there is going to be a subset of our readers that are going to look at the SwitchNAServer and see a world of possibilities to deliver better services to their clients. It is a quad-core, x86 processor that features a 2. This CPU has embedded graphics UHD that will be hugely useful in graphical software Virtual machines, surveillance feeds, transcoding, etc and generally more render related data tasks videos, images, etc and supports both p and 4K media playback.

    This is impressive, given that most systems at this hardware point would arrive with 4GB almost always. Another interesting inclusion is the two m. A common feature in a number of recent NAS releases, it is still very welcome in this combination device where the amount of internal hardware available would be arguable more limited due to constraints of CPU lanes and chipset.

    Our SwitchNAServer or QNAP QGD-1600P Review

    Alternatively, you can use these bays for creating an additional storage pool and volumes — just as you would with the HDD storage bays. The entire device runs on the QTS Linux platform, but from there you can create a completely unique and bespoke environment. The initial advantages are pretty obvious.

    For a start, having a single device performing the functionality of two devices will save physical space, it will utilize less power overall whilst in operation and will simplify the control of both, whilst still maintaining security and safety in access. However, other less obvious advantages are more to do with moving the evolution and innovation of NAS over recent years and moving that over to the network switch architecture. Most switches arrive with rather techie-heavy dialogue and a steep learning curve, making them considerable intimidating to non-IT professionals.

    Finally, the big guns! Not only can all the cameras be connected effectively directly to the NAS, but the easy-anywhere access of the NAS still with encryption, https, VPN and other services available ports over very well and usably in surveillance.

    Finally, thanks to the QNAP QVR Pro platform and the 8 camera licenses included, you have a full CCTV system that can be accessed over the network, internet or locally with a keyboard, monitor and mouse KVM support and has a complete dashboard to view your IP cameras, each with their own settings, permissions, triggers and control.

    You even get 8 camera licenses included for the software, 4 times that of their nearest rival.

    Magnus Carlsen and Ian Nepomniach aim for chess crown this week

    The most obvious disadvantage is that you are putting two eggs in one basket, meaning that if the system dies, you lose access to both your NAS and your Network Switch. Although I have already touched on this, it is a valid concern and is definitely going to be a concern for those who wrap their whole business around a single switch that connects to the internet.

    However, for me personally, the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages in the long run and can easily be resolved with even a low priced UPS. This is where you can install virtual machine environments in the switch side of the device. You can select the VM installation directory and space allocation that you want to provide to this VM. Once the initial steps are complete, you can move into a more bespoke setup for you.

    LodenDahGrafix

    It is the user interface of the switch and is very similar in design to the majority of core system QNAP applications. For those unfamiliar with the QNAP operating system, it arrives with hundreds of free applications, can be accessed from a web browser or desktop client, arrives with many, many apps for mobile on IOS and Android and is definitely in the top two operating systems you can get for network-attached storage devices. This is a rare game that overwhelms the great Alekhine at almost every stage of the contest.

    Rab1 Re7 The white break opens in the center at Ne2 Nd7 Nxd7 Rxd7 Nf4 Rf6 Nxe4 dxe4 Rxe4, and his edge neat tactical Harden with finesse. Therefore: 30 … f6? See figure; 30… Ne Black can log on with Rce1f5 Qe8 Sadly, in the case of black, 31… Kxf7 becomes Rxe4 Kg8 Rd7 Re8 Nd6 Ra8 Nb8 Kf7 Ra7 Nxa6 Rd7 Rd4 Ne7 Rd5 Nxd Nc5 Rd8 Ne4 Nb7 Ke6 Nc8 wins Ending with Rxd8, Black resigns ahead of 53… Nxd8 Nc3 Bb4 4.

    Bd3 Nc6 6.

    QGD Exchange : The f3-e4 plan

    Ne2 Nge7 7. OO Bf5 8. Bxf5 Nxf5 9. Qd3 Qd7 Nd1 OO Bxe3 Rfe 81 3. Nf4 Bd6 Rfe1 Nb4 Rac1 Nxc2 Rxc2 Qxf4


    Posted in Qgd

    thoughts on “Qgd

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *