Khawaja sara mobile no


  • Sara Khan Phone Number, WhatsApp Number, Contact Number, Office Phone Number
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  • Trans Folks Will Finally Be Counted in Pakistan, But Other Rights Lag
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  • Sara Khan Phone Number, WhatsApp Number, Contact Number, Office Phone Number

    Feb 22, Views 1. Image courtesy Oneindia News YouTube channel. The Lahore High Court of Pakistan took a major step in defense of transgender rights in January by including the transgender community in the March population census. The Pakistani government has officially recognized a third gender since — a move that granted basic civil rights, such as the ability to identify as trans on official documents. However, the trans community was disenfranchised until , when the Supreme Court of Pakistan declared equal rights for transgender individuals, including the right to vote as a third-gender person, as well as the right to inheritances.

    Before that, only males and females were permitted to vote, even though a third gender was officially recognized. By , transgender Pakistanis were running for government office.

    Pakistan joins India, Nepal, Germany, Australia, New Zealand and Bangladesh as one of the few countries that officially recognizes transgender people within its borders. There are no official figures on how many people in Pakistan identify as transgender, but the TransAction advocacy group estimates to Straits Times that there are roughly , trans individuals in the nation of million. While the transgender community in India, Bangladesh and Nepal are known by the name hijra, in Urdu this is considered a derogatory term and instead they are referred to as Khwaja Sara and Khwaja Sira.

    Also like hijra, Khwaja Sara exclusively refers to people who have transitioned from being assigned male at birth to being female, and castration is a major rite of passage. That a majority fundamentalist Muslim nation such as Pakistan to recognize Khwaja Sara speaks to the long history the community has had in the South Asian region, even though they were criminalized under the rule of the British Raj.

    Even with all the advancements enjoyed by the Khwaja — that transgender communities around the world right now only dream of — Khwaja Sara still suffer from discrimination, violence, sexual violence and lack of access to education and health services. In November , a video of a group of men flogging and torturing a Khwaja Sara woman went viral. Daanish not his real name is biologically female and pre-medical transition. While public changing rooms and toilets are the bane of transgender lives around the world, in Pakistan gender segregation is inviolable and the issue is particularly acute.

    Daanish related a typical experience at an airport toilet. Vice also reports that not one single transgender man has registered as third-gender since the possibility became available. Their invisibility demonstrates that the country still has a long way to go for the entirety of the LGBTQ community, not just the trans women who have historically always been visible, whether accepted or not.

    In Pakistan, it is against the law to be gay, but not transgender. The clerics further noted that the humiliation, insult, or teasing of transgender citizens should be treated as a crime under Islamic law. While a fatwa is not actually legally binding, it opens the door for government legislation to follow. The contradictions are strong in Pakistan, but in many ways the country is still light years ahead of the developed world on this issue.

    Just last month, the Khawja Sara community of Peshawar threw a huge birthday gala for one of its matriarchs, Shakeela. While there was a police presence, for once the women were allowed to celebrate, dance and enjoy the party without fear of violence from outsiders and the police.

    The police even functioned as party security to keep out those without invitations. Magazine, and more. An adult Third Culture Kid, she has lived in 13 countries and 18 cities around the world, and currently calls Lighthouse Point, Florida home.

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    Day 1 — We emerge into the arrival hall of Karachi airport to blinding light, a mass of people, midday heat and an intense scent of roses. The terrace is full of birds: over a dozen sparrows, crows which are smaller than the crows in London and elegant with grey necks, and mynahs which move like flocks of starlings in the sky. We decide to go to the beach before sunset to ride a camel decorated in bright Rajasthani dress.

    As soon as we dismount, a man appears with a white horse. And a little boy clutching 2 red roses to sell. Day 3 — Outside the anti-terrorist courthouse there are paparazzi and a TV crew waiting for the ex petroleum minister up on corruption charges. We learn that you can buy most drugs over-the-counter in the pharmacy including valium. Tempting but no. Tomorrow we start in earnest. I needed to be here in Pakistan to get closer to the reality of my female characters in a particular time and place.

    The whole village — men, women, children, goats — attends the meetings to discuss how, when IET brings them electricity by means of solar power, they might best use it to improve life in a sustainable way. There is much discussion in these meetings, and much laughter.

    The children giggle at my pigeon Urdu and sing happy birthday with me, looking with interest at the photos we take of them. In Humzo Shamoo, the poorest of the 3 villages, my uncle CEO of Indus Earth tells me that one of the things they really want is furniture for their school. He asks if I can help with that, and I say yes! We go to look at the school where part of the wall has fallen in, and see the building has become so unsafe that the villagers have begun to build another, smaller building, using their own scarce resources.

    Some encounters change you. I promise them I will raise the money for school furniture they sit 2 to a desk , a desk for the teacher, 2 table fans and repairs to the school building. I can do that. I will. Tomorrow we have a meeting with Bindiya, the head of the transgender community in Karachi. Usman tells us about the time he went with his father to give food to people living in poverty, and how his father explained the importance of sitting down to eat with them.

    But first we use tissues to mop up some of the grease from the paratha, so much so, that the waiter brings us a new box of tissues. We soon see a tall and glamorous khwaja-sara coming towards us and Aisha greets her like an old friend, which pleases her enormously. Aisha: hands held out, delighted Ahh….

    Aisha and I collapse in giggles — her name is Shazia, what are the chances! We find one on a patch of waste ground behind the hospital, which seems a surprising place to meet, but anything is possible. Could our contact be behind it, staying out of the sun? The phone rings again and it seems we are at the wrong water pump. We drive and Usman somehow knows that the man standing smiling in a green t-shirt is A. He gets in the car and directs us down some twisting streets to the correct water pump which we would never have found without him.

    This is the colony by the hospital where B has her base, in a house down some alleyways. The area is poor but clean and well-kept. And finally we have arrived. We go through a doorway where B waits for us. Ideally this would be in her words, but my Urdu is not up to that.

    Bindiya leads us into her room and introduces us to Munnee and Sabna who have a bedroom upstairs. B offers us juice, water, chai, checks the fan is not too much or too little for us. Bindiya Rana She asks the reason for this inter view. I explain about my play and that one of my aims for this trip is to gain insight into the experience of being transgender in Pakistan today, in order to more authentically represent my transgender character of 2, years ago.

    I also say that I want to help her in any way I can, to promote her organization and raise awareness of the transgender experience in Pakistan. Aisha also explains her role: a audio-visual documenting of our trip and an artistic response in photographing transgender women and their lives. We are at the heart of the association, and she is sought after for advice and action.

    She wants to know what questions I have for her. I ask. Look, inside, we are women… But before I express that, of course I feel like a woman inside but there are limits. There are limits that I live in because I come from Pakistan. I tell her my play is set at a time when courtesans lived in grand residences and my character, a transgender courtesan, had a love relationship with a nobleman. There are people who are out here, even at this age, who would love to showcase their love to me, but can only do it within 4 walls.

    We are offered soft drinks and delicious Peak Frean biscuits with cumin seeds I remember these from my last visit 20 years ago. I want someone I can talk to, who I can share my problems with, my companion. Are you soliciting?

    She looks tired. I have no agenda except to understand and tell their story their way. She begins to tell me about her association, Gender Interactive Alliance. The main work they plan to do right now, the funds they need, is to spread awareness in different provinces in the interior, where the transgender community has no idea about the Supreme Court ruling.

    They have no idea of what rights they have at present. They have no connections with healthcare facilities, they have no connections with human rights organisations, so what she wants to do is go around and spread awareness. We would have to meet up with people over there, she says. Right now the movement is still in a nascent age, so they want to spread awareness more than anything else.

    It looks bad on us when we go out looking for funds, when we go out looking for donations, she says. When a poor person does it, they call it begging. Her organisation is limited when it comes to helping transgenders in this community when it comes to healthcare, because when they go to government hospitals, they get their appointment at one place, and they have to travel somewhere else to get free medication. Transgenders can rarely travel by bus —because in some buses they would be asked to go and stand with the boys, and in some buses they would be asked to go in the ladies section.

    They have to link themselves to different organisations. So after a while they stop talking about it, because nothing will be done. She continued despite death threats and the difficulties of campaigning with negligible funds.

    Our meeting comes to an end — Bindiya has already delayed another meeting she was meant to be at. We say goodbye — she gives me her card, and we become facebook friends. I feel I am saying goodbye to a real friend, but I know this is the beginning of something rather than the end. At the Beach Luxury Hotel security is tight, starting outside with a metal rod checking under the car divining for bombs? It feels like airport security without the frisking or restrictions on liquids.

    Laxmi is charming, intelligent and witty — she has the audience eating out of her hand. She and the moderator speak excellent English but most of the talk is in Urdu. Luckily, Laxmi keeps lapsing into English. Hijra means that I leave my own tribe in search of my own true self. But if we learn to love ourselves, womanhood is so powerful that man will bend to it Then I can ask somebody else to love me.

    When I get her to sign her book, we chat and she is interested to hear about the Sanskrit manuscript of BC which inspired my poem sequence and play, and which mentions a transgender courtesan.

    The talk is in English, which is a bonus. Afterwards in the food tent, I get samosas and a cup of Kashmiri chai [a deliciously spiced, pink, milky tea topped with pistachio slivers] and Aisha is delighted to find Dominos pizza, as her stomach is tired of being challenged.

    I recognise Kami, from the BBC documentary How Gay is Pakistan and go and talk to her, trying not to feel like a groupie-fan, although there are groupie-fans hovering near her. Kami is lovely and friendly after some initial wariness. Kami is much in demand, so we leave reluctantly and with a huge crush on her OK, I speak for myself — she is magnetic! Pacing the stage and speaking with fire and conviction, B has the presence of a gifted and inspiring politician.

    I have noticed that there is a real interest here in transgender, but many of the young men are clearly not here for the talks — their interest is less… honourable. I hope our paths cross over the course of the festival. Sharmeen is one of the reasons I am here — she is my host partner and without her introduction, I would not have been able to meet with Bindiya. She talks about her 3 current films: Song of Lahore is about Sachal Studios, a classical Pakistani and jazz fusion project; A Journey of a Thousand Miles , about a unit of Bangladeshi women peacekeepers; and A Girl in the River , her latest film about honour killings, has been nominated for an Oscar.

    After the talk she is swamped by fans. Later in the evening is a screening of Manto, the Movie which is based on a TV series by Shahid Nadeem on the life of the celebrated Pakistani writer. I am gutted to miss his talk again, but our ride is leaving, too much Biryani and Dominos has been eaten, and we have another day of the festival to go.

    The day after tomorrow, we leave for Lahore. My Urdu is definitely improving though, graduating from pigeon to mynah, as I keep repeating new phrases to add to my limited childhood arsenal: me jana chaati hu nh!

    She uses the first a lot, to drivers, shop-keepers and new friends to their surprise and delight. My favourite word is bidgli [electricity] which we use a lot. Is there electricity? There is no electricity! The latter is common due to load-shedding, when the public electrical supply is turned on and off at prescribed hours.

    Harem is seen as a place of fulfilment of carnal pleasures. The Mughal harem specially becomes a centre of myth making, since it represents the space of sexual escapades of otherwise shrewd and all powerful emperors.

    There is no doubt that khwajasaras were associated with the harem. They were part of an elaborate organisation ensuring the functioning of a harem. They were treasury supervisors and also of properties of the royal ladies. They were active participants in the political and administrative functioning of the empire as well. Participation in political, administrative organisations That a history of active participation of sexual minorities in Mughal political and administrative organisations can be forgotten says a lot about the way popular history and popular culture function.

    While contemporary historians have enormous amount of information on the khwajasaras, it has not been utilised. Khwajasaras played the role of trusted servants, conveying messages and confidential information.

    Even Shah Jahan, when he was imprisoned by his son, was in the protective custody of eunuch Aitbar Khan. The role of Khwajasaras was not limited only to royal service. They were active participants in the administrative functioning of the state as well. Itibar Khan, a confidential servant of Babur, was made responsible for the safety of royal ladies who were travelling from Iran to India.

    He was also made the governor of Delhi during the reign of Akbar. Khwaja Agah enjoyed the position of faujdar garrison commander of Agra on several occasions.

    Itibar Khan defended the city of Agra when Shah Jahan marched on it during his rebellion. Thus there was an important and apparent presence of khwajasaras in spaces apart from the harem.

    In the frame, khwajasaras can be seen in the service of the princess. They were the non-males in an overall patriarchal setup and were treated with hatred.

    Trans Folks Will Finally Be Counted in Pakistan, But Other Rights Lag

    Men thought khwajasaras were envious of their manhood. It is difficult to ascertain how far the eunuchs cradled animosity towards men, because we hardly have information from their perspective, but it is well known that khwajasaras were faithful and sincere to their masters, both male and female. The khwajasara of Prince Murad Bakhsh even laid down his life for his master. The narrative of khwajasaras envying manhood might just have been an attempt to legitimise their dehumanisation.

    Contemporary observers called them animals, monsters and baboons, generally attributing to them qualities of being covetous of gold, diamond and pearls.

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    Khwajasaras are reported to have been foul in speech and fond of silly stories. It is said that they were licentious in examining everything, both goods and women, which came into the palace. But the fact is that it was the job of these khwajasaras to inspect goods coming and leaving the palace. They were the officers on guard.

    They had the authority to search everything with great care and detail to stop the entry of bhang, wine, opium, nutmegs or any other drug which can act as intoxicant. Bytransgender Pakistanis were running for government office. Pakistan joins India, Nepal, Germany, Australia, New Zealand and Bangladesh as one of the few countries that officially recognizes transgender people within its borders. There are no official figures on how many people in Pakistan identify as transgender, but the TransAction advocacy group estimates to Straits Times that there are roughlytrans individuals in the nation of million.

    While the transgender community in India, Bangladesh and Nepal are known by the name hijra, in Urdu this is considered a derogatory term and instead they are referred to as Khwaja Sara and Khwaja Sira. Also like hijra, Khwaja Sara exclusively refers to people who have transitioned from being assigned male at birth to being female, and castration is a major rite of passage.

    That a majority fundamentalist Muslim nation such as Pakistan to recognize Khwaja Sara speaks to the long history the community has had in the South Asian region, even though they were criminalized under the rule of the British Raj.

    Even with all the advancements enjoyed by the Khwaja — that transgender communities around the world right now only dream of — Khwaja Sara still suffer from discrimination, violence, sexual violence and lack of access to education and health services.

    In Novembera video of a group of men flogging and torturing a Khwaja Sara woman went viral. Daanish not his real name is biologically female and pre-medical transition. While public changing rooms and toilets are the bane of transgender lives around the world, in Pakistan gender segregation is inviolable and the issue is particularly acute. Daanish related a typical experience at an airport toilet.

    Vice also reports that not one single transgender man has registered as third-gender since the possibility became available. Their invisibility demonstrates that the country still has a long way to go for the entirety of the LGBTQ community, not just the trans women who have historically always been visible, whether accepted or not.

    In Pakistan, it is against the law to be gay, but not transgender.


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