Godot preload scene


  • How to Make a Strategy Game in Godot – Part 1
  • Godot Tips and Best Practice
  • Creating a Preloading Screen in Phaser 3
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  • Godot Engine Tutorial Part 6–Handling Multiple Scenes and Global Data
  • Creating a Phaser 3 Template – Part 1
  • How to Make a Strategy Game in Godot – Part 1

    For this tutorial, you will need the following: Basic to intermediate JavaScript skills A code editor Chrome Web Browser Have NodeJS installed locally For this tutorial, it is recommended that you are familiar with basic Phaser concepts such as scenes, setting up the config for your game, running your game locally, etc.

    If you are not familiar with these concepts, you will be able to follow along with the tutorial, but we will not be covering these topics in depth. If you would like to learn more about these concepts or would like a refresher, you can check out the How to Create a Game with Phaser 3 tutorial here on GameDev Academy.

    Also, for this tutorial, it is recommended that you are familiar with Git and NodeJS, but it is a not a requirement for this tutorial.

    If you are not familiar with these concepts, you will still be able to follow along. Project Setup For this tutorial, we are going to use the Phaser 3 Webpack Project Template as a starting point for our template, and it can be found here on GitHub. After you get a copy of the template files, you will need to install the required Node dependencies to get the template to run. In your terminal, navigate to the template folder, and run the following command: npm install.

    This will take a few seconds to run, and once it is done, you should see a message that a number of packages was added to your project.

    To make sure everything installed correctly, run the command: npm run start , and you should see a message that states webpack was compiled successfully. With the basic project setup, we can start creating our template.

    Update Project and Create Scenes The first thing we are going to do is take all of the logic from the index. We are going to take the game logic and the Phaser config, and put those components in their own files.

    In your project folder, go into the src folder and create two new folders: Config and Scenes. In the Config folder, create a new file called config. In the config. In the GameScene. Scene class and it currently contains logic for displaying an image in our game.

    Now, to use our new config object and GameScene class we will need to import them in our index. Open index. We created a new class called Game and we set it to extend the Phaser. Game class. In the super method, we passed in the config object to the Phaser.

    Since our config object did not have any information about the scenes of our game, we had to add them to our Phaser game. Lastly, we told Phaser to start our Game scene. Now, if you go back to your browser, you should see the Phaser logo and it should not be moving since we removed the logic for tween.

    Next, we will create the rest of the scenes that will be used in our template. For each scene we will create a new class that does nothing for the time being. In your project folder create the following files: BootScene. In BootScene. The first scene we will focus on is the Boot Scene. This scene will be the first scene that is loaded by our game, and we will use it load any assets that will be displayed in the Preloader Scene.

    For our template, the only asset we need for the Preloader Scene is a logo image. To follow along with the tutorial, you can use the following image: If you have your own logo image, you are welcome to use it.

    Once you have your image, save it in the assets folder. In this scene, we are going to display the logo we loaded in the Boot Scene, add a progress bar, and finally load the rest of the assets we will be using in our template. For the progress bar, we are going to reuse some of the code from the Creating a Preloading Screen in Phaser 3 tutorial.

    For the purpose of this tutorial, we will not be covering this code in depth, but if you would like to learn more about it we recommend that you check out the tutorial mentioned above. In PreloaderScene. We also included a Loading We listen for the progress event, and use it to update the progress bar and the progress bar percentage. We listen for the fileprogress event, and use it to update the file text.

    We listen for the complete event, and use that to clean up all of the progress bar game objects. Finally, we load the rest of the assets we will be using in our game.

    The last thing we need to add to our Preloader Scene is logic to transition to the Title Scene. This logic could be put in with the rest of the logic that is triggered in the complete event, however, when there are not that many assets the progress bar will disappear quickly, and the user may not see the logo image at all. To work around this, we can either move the logo to its own scene or we can add some additional logic to our scene. For the purpose of this tutorial, we will do the latter.

    To work around this issue, we will add a new time event to our Preloader Scene. We will use this event to make sure the logo is displayed for a minimum number of seconds, and when the event is triggered it will call a new function that will be used to load the Title Scene. Lastly, we will also call this new function when the complete event is fired that way we know that all assets have been loaded and the user has had enough time to view our logo.

    Added a new timed event that is triggered after 3 seconds. When the event is triggered, it also calls the new ready function. We use this function to create a new variable called readyCount and we set it to 0.

    Lastly, we added a new function called ready, and when it is called we increment the readyCount variable. Once this variable is equal to 2, then we know it is safe to transition to the Title Scene. Conclusion With the logic for our Preloader Scene in place, this brings Part 1 of this tutorial to an end. In Part 2 , we will continue our tutorial by: Adding the logic for the Title Scene. Adding the logic for the Options Scene.

    Adding the logic for the Credits Scene. Adding the logic for the Game Scene. I hoped you enjoyed Part 1 of this tutorial and found it helpful.

    If you have any questions, or suggestions on what we should cover next, let us know in the comments below. Related Posts.

    Godot Tips and Best Practice

    Learn to code and make impressive games with JavaScript and Phaser 3! Once you have these setup, we will setup the basic code for our game. Open your IDE, and create a new file called index. We are going to create a basic html page, add a reference to Phaser, and create our Phaser game object.

    In index. In the config object, in the type field, we set the renderer type for our game. The two main types are Canvas and WebGL. WebGL is a faster renderer and has better performance, but not all browsers support it. In the config object, we specify the width and height of the viewable area of our game. In the config object, we embedded a scene object which will use the preload and create functions we defined.

    Lastly, we passed our config object to Phaser when we created the new game instance. If you try running your game, you should see a black screen, and if you open the console in the developer tools, you should see a log with the version of Phaser your game is running.

    Loading Our Assets Now that our project is setup, we can get started. Before we can create our preloader, we will need to load some assets into our game. To keep things simple, we are going to use one image and reload it a few times to simulate loading a large number of assets.

    The asset for the game can be downloaded here. You will need to place the image in same folder as index. To load our image and display it in our game, you will need to update the preload and create functions in index.

    Creating the Preloader With our assets loaded, it is time to create our preloader. In the preload function, add the following code: this. The progress and fileprogress events will be emitted every time a file has been loaded, and the complete event will only be emitted once all the files are done loading. When the progress event is emitted, you will also receive a value between 0 and 1, which can be used track the overall progress of the loading process.

    When the fileprogress event is emitted, you will also receive an object containing information on the file that was just loaded. Both of these can be used to create custom preloader with the information that is provided.

    Graphics to create the progress bar. We are doing this by calculating the width of the rectangle to be based on the progress value we are receiving. So, every time we receive the progress event, we should see the rectangle grow. If you reload the game, you should see a nice progress bar that fills up as the assets are being loaded.

    However, there is one problem with it. When the all of the assets are loaded, the preloader is staying on the screen, and the logo image is being loaded over top of it. To fix this, we can update the complete event listener to destroy our preloader once all assets are loaded. In the complete event listener, add the following code below the console. Adding Some Text We have the main part of our preloader done, but we can easily enhance the preloader by adding some additional text to it.

    These variables are getting the width and height of the current viewable area of our game. This game object is using the width and height variables we just created, and we set the style and default text of the game object. We set the origin of the game object to be 0. Lastly, we updated the complete event listener to destroy our loading text once all the games assets were loaded.

    If you reload your game, your screen should look like this: Next, we are going to add some additional text that will display the percent of the loading bar. To do this, we just need to create another text game object, and update the text to use the value that is being sent to the progress event listener.

    We set the origin to 0. In the progress event listener, we are updating the text of the object, every time a file is loaded. We are multiplying the value by since the value that is emitted is between 0 and 1. Lastly, we updated the complete event listener to destroy the object.

    If you reload your game, you should see the progress bar percentage update as the progress bar fills up. With the progress bar now showing the percentage, we will now add some text to display which asset has been loaded. Once again, we will create another text game object and we will update the text of the game object with the file data that is being sent to the fileprogress event listener. For this example, we ended up outputting the asset key instead of the file name since we are only loading the one image.

    If you want to output the file name, you can update the following line: assetText. Conclusion With the asset text now being displayed, this brings this tutorial to a close. As you can see, adding a preloader to your game is a great solution when you will be loading a large number of assets, and you want to keep the players informed of the games current state. With Phaser, it is really easy to add a simple preloader and you can easily extend these examples to create a more complex preloader.

    I hoped you enjoyed this tutorial and found it helpful. If you have any questions, or suggestions on what we should cover next, let us know in the comments below.

    Related Posts.

    Creating a Preloading Screen in Phaser 3

    To make sure everything installed correctly, run the command: npm run startand you should see a message that states webpack was compiled successfully.

    With the basic project setup, we can start creating our template. Update Project and Create Scenes The first thing we are going to do is take all of the logic from the index. We are going to take the game logic and the Phaser config, and put those components in their own files. In your project folder, go into the src folder and create two new folders: Config and Scenes.

    In the Config folder, create a new file called config. In the config. In the GameScene. Scene class and it currently contains logic for displaying an image in our game. Now, to use our new config object and GameScene class we will need to import them in our index. Open index. We created a new class called Game and we set it to extend the Phaser.

    Game class. In the super method, we passed in the config object to the Phaser. Since our config object did not have any information about the scenes of our game, we had to add them to our Phaser game.

    Lastly, we told Phaser to start our Game scene. Now, if you go back to your browser, you should see the Phaser logo and it should not be moving since we removed the logic for tween. Next, we will create the rest of the scenes that will be used in our template. For each scene we will create a new class that does nothing for the time being. In your project folder create the following files: BootScene.

    In BootScene.

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    The first scene we will focus on is the Boot Scene. This scene will be the first scene that is loaded by our game, and we will use it load any assets that will be displayed in the Preloader Scene. For our template, the only asset we need for the Preloader Scene is a logo image.

    To follow along with the tutorial, you can use the following image: If you have your own logo image, you are welcome to use it. Once you have your image, save it in the assets folder. In this scene, we are going to display the logo we loaded in the Boot Scene, add a progress bar, and finally load the rest of the assets we will be using in our template. For the progress bar, we are going to reuse some of the code from the Creating a Preloading Screen in Phaser 3 tutorial. For the purpose of this tutorial, we will not be covering this code in depth, but if you would like to learn more about it we recommend that you check out the tutorial mentioned above.

    In PreloaderScene. We also included a Loading We listen for the progress event, and use it to update the progress bar and the progress bar percentage. So, I started over with a fresh project. And I worked on the new, better structure.

    But soon I figured out, that at some point I would like to add multiplayer to the game. But I would have to make major changes to the structure again in order to make it work. So I once again started to build the project from the ground up. Of course, some of the know-how of structuring a game comes with experience. But I would argue, that if I would have better thought out the structure in advance, it would have saved me some time.

    Godot Engine Tutorial Part 6–Handling Multiple Scenes and Global Data

    So here are a few tips in Godot to structure your game. Use more than one scene Look at Scenes in Godot Engine as a part or object of your game, that regularly can show up. Of course, you can decide for yourself, what a scene should consist of. Even though it is not advised, you could cram in your whole game into one big, single scene. But a much better approach is to split up your game into different scenes: So, for example, you could make a separate enemy-scene.

    Then, every time this enemy shows up, you can just instantiate this enemy-scene. One scene can also be made out of different scenes. So, for example, if you have a player-scene, it can consist of the body-scene and the weapon-scene. As you will see, the scene-system in Godot is a very flexible and versatile way of building your game objects and game worlds. Your scenes should be able to run, even without the rest of the game A good practice is, that you build your scenes in a way so that they can run independently from the rest of the game.

    This is partly possible, if you do not make connections via the SceneTreebut rather make the use of Signals and let them communicate that way. To be honest, most of the time it is not possible to make every scene runnable, but the more scenes are runnable on their own, to easier it is to rearrange stuff inside your project or sometimes even use the same scenes for different projects. Use signals Signals are a very handy way to notify some node, that something did happen.

    A lot of nodes already have built-in signals. You can find them in the Node tab beside the Inspector — check the screenshot. From there you can connect them with your code.

    One of the most basic usages is connecting a button click to a function. Signals and Groups A big advantage of using signals is, that you can let instances of scenes communicate with each other. But you are also able to run the scene on its own without breaking the game you will get notified, that a signal is not connected though. You can also build custom signals and connect them via your code. For more information check out my post about signals also the official documentation here and here can help you understand signals.

    Make use of groups Right beside the signal tab is the groups tab Check the screenshot again. There you can add a node to a group.

    Creating a Phaser 3 Template – Part 1

    Groups function a little bit like a tag system. Check out this link, if you want to learn more about groups. Use inheritance Inheritance is a powerful way to structure your game.

    Imagine you have three different types of enemies in your game. All three enemies have characteristics that they share, and characteristics that are unique to each enemy. So one way to achieve that is by creating three unique scenes where you build those three enemies. One green, one red and one blue. Great, job is done. But if you want to change something about your enemies, you have to change it in every one of those unique scenes. Make Inherited Scene The second way is to use inheritance.

    So first, you would make a parent scene. In our example, this parent scene would consist of an enemy with no color. Then you would make three inherited scenes check screenshot of that parent scene and just change the color of the enemy in each scene separately.

    So now you also have three enemies. But if you ever want to change that enemy scene, you just have to make that change in the parent scene. The inherited scenes will be changed automatically. Have a look here for more information on inheritance. Make use of Layers and Masks Layers and masks can help tremendously, when you deal with collisions. By setting different layers and masks you can control, which objects are colliding: Godot Layers and Masks The layer is where the object appears in.

    The mask describes what layers the given node will scan for collisions. Those Godot tips and tricks will help you with coding.


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