Seeing eunuch in dream hindu


  • A coin from eunuch…a token of honour
  • KABIR’S POEMS
  • Hyperbole and horror: hijras and the British imperial state in India
  • The Curse of the Hijra
  • The Untold History of Hampi
  • Eunuch - dream meaning
  • BJP wants us to see Indian Sonia Gandhi as Italian but Canadian Akshay Kumar as Indian
  • A coin from eunuch…a token of honour

    Abdur Razzak Samarqandi was on an important mission to open diplomatic relations between the Timurid Empire and what was then the most powerful city-state in India. Vijayanagara, the great Hindu City of Victory, was then approaching the peak of its power, and controlled almost all the rich lands of peninsula India to the south of the river Tunghabadra. Abdur Razzak was not, however, in the best of moods. There followed a sea voyage through the Gulf and across the Arabia Sea to Calicut, where the agitated ambassador passed in and out of consciousness with a high fever.

    But Abdur Razzak had reason to believe this voyage would be worth his while; and indeed things did begin to improve as soon as he entered the territories of Vijayanagara. Most of his regions are flourishing, and he possesses three hundred ports. He has a thousand elephants with bodies like mountains and miens like demons….

    Abdur Razzak noted the magnificent elephant stables with separate stalls for each of the beasts, and the bazaars overflowing with produce filling the colonnaded streets. Eventually, he arrived at the innermost palace of the king, where he observed a vast audience hall, a vaulted hall of justice, the spacious hall of the chief minister, and a mint. Right and left of him stood a numerous crowd of men ranged in a circle. Abdur Razzak was not alone.

    All visitors were dazzled by the riches of Vijayanagara. Any stone which has a weight over 30 carats belongs to the King. For this guard is placed over the diggers, and if any person is found with any, he is taken with all that he has…. The Gujeratis buy them and take them for sale in the city of Vijayanagara, where these diamonds fetch a high price, especially those they call naifes, being those which nature has worked; while the Portuguese value those most which have been polished.

    The Canarese say that just as a virgin is more valuable than a woman who is not one, so this naife diamond is worth more than a cut one…. Yet the wonders of Vijayanagara were not just matter of gold, silver and precious stones: the City of Victory was also a major centre of South Indian culture— retaining and developing the best of that which had been salvaged from the wreck of the three greatest Empires of southern history: the Pallavas, the Chalukyas and above all the mighty Cholas of Tanjore.

    Krishnadevaraya r. He doubled the size of the Empire in less than a decade, taking great swathes of territory from his neighbours, the Deccani Muslim Sultans of Bijapur and Gulbarga and the Tamil Hindus of Srirangapatnam. He also adopted some aspects of Islamic culture that he admired in his neighbours, especially aspects of diplomatic dress and customs.

    He also introduced firearms and canon, importing horses, improving fortifications and creating a remarkably effective revenue department to power the workings of his state. The epitome of a profoundly cultured courtly South Indian ruler, like a Renaissance prince he was a great patron of writers in Sanskrit, Tamil, Kannada and Telugu—as well as of painters, architects and sculptors, generating around him a remarkable age of artistic, intellectual and literary creativity.

    One of his court poets, Allasani Peddana, hinted at the closeness of the bonds that developed between Krishnadevaraya and the writers he admired: While guards stood by, Fearless men with terrifying swords of blinding brightness, And tributary kings surrounded him… His heart was moved by the sweetness Of poetry and, from his throne, He spoke to me with great kindness.

    But he also found time to write poetry himself, some of which survives. His epic, the Amuktamalyada, or the Giver of the Worn Garland, remains one of the brightest mirrors to the wealth, beauty, sophistication and sheer sensuality of Vijayanagara at its peak. In some parts of the poem, he writes of the economic duties of kings, so encouraging prosperity: A King should improve the harbours of his country and so encourage its commerce that horses, elephants, precious gems, sandalwood and pearls are freely imported.

    Make the merchants of distant countries who import elephants and good horses be attached to yourself by providing them with a daily audience, presents and allowing decent profits. There is contradictory evidence about the exact circumstances. But the brothers soon received the blessings of the influential mahant of the important temple of Shringeri, and this, and the war that had broken out between the different sultans of the Deccan, allowed them to lay the foundations of what rapidly became a hugely successful Hindu-ruled Empire in a part of the world that had for over a century been dominated by a succession of Islamic dynasties.

    It is a simple and attractive vision, and one that at first sight looks entirely plausible. The problem is that these ideas rest on a set of assumptions which recent scholarship has done much to undermine Share this on For a location, the brothers chose a stunning natural fortress, an amphitheatre formed of a rock-strewn basin of the Tunghabadra river, and here they planned a mighty city in the shape of a mandala or cosmic diagram.

    This was probably already a sacred landscape—after all, the boundaries between the divine and material worlds are notoriously porous in India. The actual soil is thought by many rural Hindus to be the residence of the divinity and, in many villages is worshipped and understood to be literally the body of the Goddess; the features of the landscape—the mountains and forests, the caves and crevices and outcrops of rock, the mighty rivers—are all understood to be her physical features.

    This landscape is not dead but alive, and littered with tirthas, crossing place between different worlds, linked with the tracks of pilgrimage.

    The pilgrim who climbs to a hilltop Hampi shrine or swims in its sacred river enters a ford between different states of perception, where you can cross from the world of men to the world of the Gods as easily as you might cross a stream in the dry season. Certainly the fabulously otherworldly quality of these stone-strewn, monkey-haunted Hampi hills, and its mighty river dotted with sacred islands and holy groves, soon came to be associated with a variety of divinities.

    Some spoke of it as Kishkindha, the kingdom of the monkey king Surgiva who settled beside the hermitage of the great sage Matanga. This picture of Hindu-Muslim hybridity, of Indo-Islamic intellectual and artistic fecundity is important, for it comes in such stark contrast to the received wisdom— articulated most elegantly by Naipaul— that for India the medieval period was a long tale of defeat and destruction Share this on Others preferred to remember this sacred landscape as the abode of Pampa, from whom the modern name Hampi derives.

    Pampa, the personification of the Tunghabhadra, was said to be the beautiful daughter of Matanga, who was above all deeply devoted to the great God Virupaksha Shiva.

    Such was her love for the God, and so great her attentions to the sages who gathered around his shrine, that they bestowed a boon on her that Virupaksha would fall in love with her.

    When he saw her bathe in the Tunghabhadra, the God found her irresistible. Their marriage is still celebrated in the Virupaksha shrine every Spring. Sanctified and charged with immense cosmological and religious significance by these myths, the city grew with great speed. The Sangama dynasty which ruled Vijayanagara for its first hundred years built at first relatively modestly, and the Ramachandra temple of Devarya I , the biggest of the temples seen by Abdur Razzak, is actually a fairly small building by later standards, drawing heavily on Chola and Chalukya models.

    The Sangamas divided the city into two main zones: a sacred enclosure, which contained temples conservatively built in the most traditional Dravidian styles; and a Royal enclosure, where there was much more stylistic exploration. It was really Krishnadevaraya who revolutionised the look of his city, transforming it as Augustus had transformed Rome. He also commissioned several magnificent new megalithic sculptures to adorn his capital.

    Several have survived intact, including the spectacular carved granite monolith of Vishnu Narasimha, showing the ferocious lion-headed God sitting in state of uncharacteristic peace, resting cross-legged in a yogic position with his legs bound with a yoga-band.

    Krishnadevaraya also provided a remarkable irrigation system, with water being brought to the city by a network of viaducts. Its rulers, particularly the usurper Ramaraya, grew arrogant and not only succeeded in falling out with all their neighbours, but actually managed to unite them in hatred and envy of the largest and richest of the South Indian kingdoms.

    An alliance of Muslim principalities gathered a mighty force and on January 26, defeated the army of Vijayanagara at the Battle of Tunghabadra about km to the north of the city. Ramaraya was killed almost immediately. When his head was raised on a stake, the remains of the royal army withdrew in panic to the impregnable fortress of Penuokonda, one hundred kilometre to the south of the city, and the massed troops of five sultanates fell on the undefended capital and put most of its men to the sword, leading the women and craftsmen off to slavery.

    The sculptures were smashed and the buildings of the city were set on fire. Even so, the work of destruction took five months; some say a year. Today Hampi—as Vijayanagara is now known—remains much as it was left: almost deserted, a strange, haunting and otherworldly landscape of massive boulders, dusty red-earth fields and sudden lush green banana plantations. Through all this can be seen the mighty remains of walls, gateways, watchtowers and spectacularly carved temples. It fell, according to Naipaul, because already the Hindu society it embodied had become backward looking and stagnant: it had failed to develop, and in particular had failed to develop the military means to challenge the aggressive Muslim Sultanates that surrounded it.

    The problem is that these ideas rest on a set of assumptions which recent scholarship has done much to undermine. Wagoner, was an important landmark in this process of reinterpretation. It was this dress that Abdur Razzak describes in his account of his audience with Devaraya I—and which he compared to the half-naked appearance of the king of Calicut. There was a reason for this: the kings of Vijayanagara wanted good relations with their Muslim neighbours, knowing the benefits of being able to draw technology, military techniques and commerce from them.

    As scholars are now realising, far from being the final, stagnant, backward-looking bastion of Hindu resistance imagined by Naipaul, Vijayanagara had in fact developed in all sorts of unexpected ways, taking on much of the administrative, tax collecting and military methods of the Muslim sultanates that surrounded it—notably stirrups, horseshoes, horse armour and a new type of saddle, all of which allowed Vijayanagara to put into the field an army of fearsome horse archers who could hold at bay those of the Delhi Sultanate, then the most powerful military force in India.

    Indeed Devaraya II is reputed to have employed 10, Muslim horsemen. Only a short time before the Deccani Sultanates turned on Vijayanagara, the Hindu Empire had been a prominent part of a different alliance of Muslim armies that had sacked the Sultanate of Ahmadnagar, when Hindu and Muslim armies stabled their horses in the mosques of the plundered city.

    Vijayanagara was in reality a victim of shifting alliances in Deccani power politics, not a concerted communal campaign by Muslim states intent on wiping out Hinduism from the face of India. The survey has emphasised the degree to which the buildings of sixteenth century Vijayanagara were inspired by the architecture of nearby Muslim sultanates, dropping the traditional trabeate architecture of the Hindu South in favour of the arch and dome of the Islamicate world as well as borrowing such specifics as ground plans and vaulting, plaster-coated masonry and arabesques.

    Moreover, this fruitful interaction between Hindu and Muslim ruled states was very much a two-way traffic. Just as Hindu Vijayanagara was absorbing Islamic influences, so a similar process of hybridity and mutual influence was transforming the nominally Islamic Sultanate of Bijapur.

    In both imperial British and Hindu nationalist historiography, Bijapur has traditionally been seen as one of the violent and iconoclastic Muslim sultanates which united to wipe out Vijayanagara. The mediaeval reality, it seems, was again very different. For Bijapur at this period was dominated by an atmosphere of wild, heterodox sensuality, with its libraries swelling with often heretical texts produced on the intellectual frontier between Islam and Hinduism, much of which leaned heavily on the esoteric scholarship of Vijayanagara.

    He visited both Shaivite temples and the monasteries of the Nath yogis, and knew Sanskrit better than Persian. This picture of Hindu- Muslim hybridity, of Indo-Islamic intellectual and artistic fecundity is important, for it comes in such stark contrast to the received wisdom—articulated most elegantly by Naipaul—that for India the medieval period was a long tale of defeat and destruction.

    It is significant that all this surprises us quite as much as it does: we are so used to the idea of heavily fortified frontiers between different religions—especially Hinduism and Islam—that a pre-modern attitude that sees a porous interaction across these frontiers takes us aback. Certainly, the history of Vijayanagara raises huge and important questions about faith and personal identity in pre- modern India, about how far these were fixed and immutable—or how far they were in fact flexible, tractable, negotiable.

    The evidence presented by the new work of scholars studying Vijayanagara through many prisms—archaeology and art history as well as documentary and inscriptional evidence—suggests that the borders between Islam and Hinduism in this period are far less clearly defined than we have been conditioned to expect. It also shows that in many ways Vijayanagara was surprisingly like modern India: a melting pot of many cultures which came together to form something far richer and far more remarkable than its component parts—and that its multi-faith, multi-ethnic, multi-cultured whole is the actually the source of its richness, and its strength.

    William Dalrymple is an essayist and a historian.

    KABIR’S POEMS

    India The majority is already with Modi; when the Muslim and Dalit quit eating beef and fall in love with him, Hindu Rashtra will be realised The lack of empathy on the part of the non-tax paying Hindu majority for the minorities, tribal Christians and the downtrodden is entrenched.

    It has been so even before Modi and the BJP worked it to their advantage. The middle-class savarna voter is inherently prejudiced. The lack of empathy on the part of the non-tax paying Hindu majority for the minorities, tribal Christians and the downtrodden is entrenched.

    These elections, I voted for the first time. In the last five years the word has been reinvented as a punching-bag category that "bhakts" could vilify. The only positives that can be added to this, the majoritarian religion Hinduism and nation India , already exist. Hindu India was always prejudiced; Hindutva Bharat simply tapped into and exploited these latent tendencies. This is my argument. Certainly not. India, both in class and caste, is a deeply divided country; it was always so.

    We live in segregated cities. We take this for granted. In a Dehradun bar, a girl from Welham asks me a question.

    Way before the BJP became a force to reckon with, a Christian friend, while driving through crummy West Uttar Pradesh small towns, made a throwaway remark about Muslims lacking a basic sense of hygiene. A Hindu boy, getting a haircut and shave from a Muslim barber, asks him to not shave off the beard completely.

    It was exacerbated after the Mandal Commission Report. We are, to twist a Millennial phrase, old soul bigots. This applies to the kirana store owner as much as it does to the girl in the short black dress studying to be a criminal lawyer. Nor does: how did demonetisation affect the poor Muslim in Uttar Pradesh and rob him of his livelihood?

    Any empathy they have is reserved for something imaginary: the fictional genocide of Hindus, apparently ongoing in several countries around the world. Is CSK winning? Even in cricket — our other religion — we have poor taste. His best friend is an Ansari, a Muslim embroiderer, also out of work. Nitesh and Ansari are Modi supporters. The fact of their unemployment does not rankle them.

    Nitesh hails from the same part of Bihar as Kanhaiya. Ansari is from Chhapra. I am a fan of Kanhaiya and I tried to make one out of Nitesh. I tried to change the narrative, in not just his language, but his dialect. They are full of glowing admiration for Modi. So is Nitesh. He was thrilled when Modi announced the Rs 6,a-year direct transfer scheme for farmers. Arre kuch to ayega jeb main.

    Let us not blame only Modi and Shah. They did not invent this hatred. They activated it. To that extent they are responsible. The genie is out of the bag and will be difficult to bottle.

    Lip-service has its advantages in a democracy. Lip-service is also hypocrisy. A majoritarian savarna Hindu population does not for a moment believe that the idea of India is under fire. On the contrary, they believe that the idea of India is on a roll.

    But this is not because the people have voted to save the idea of India. It will be for local reasons, regional issues, immediate agrarian distress the selling price of sugarcane , arithmetic.

    The majoritarian Indian voter is a veteran of democracy. She knows how to extract benefits by changing governments regularly, how to scare and spur the government into some kind of action, especially when elections are round the corner. She uses that Damocles sword for personal gain. This is the majoritarian agenda. This is what people want. Hindu majoritarianism is here to stay because it is who we are, no matter who runs the government. Church attendance collapsed, gay marriage was legalised and a half-Indian gay man was appointed head of state.

    Patriotism and hyper-nationalism passed into the realm of the uncool, the tacky, something beloved of Third World teenagers and nutty Americans. The new generation in India does not leave anything behind. It carries the past with it. Modi is an instigator in the classic mould. They used free data not to discover the world but the hatred within and pornography. In such conditions, misanthropy cannot be avoided.

    The BJP wins again. That is the depressing truth. This then transitions to the Helsinki syndrome in which a person being held captive begins to identify with and grow sympathetic to his or her captor, simultaneously becoming unsympathetic towards the police or other authorities. The majority is already with Modi. Once the Muslim and the Dalit quit eating beef and fall in love with him, the dream of the Hindu Rashtra will have been fully realised, albeit minus the tricolour fluttering in Lahore.

    Perhaps this is why they hate Kanhaiya. Only a lynching might spare him that fate.

    Hyperbole and horror: hijras and the British imperial state in India

    Ramaraya was killed almost immediately. When his head was raised on a stake, the remains of the royal army withdrew in panic to the impregnable fortress of Penuokonda, one hundred kilometre to the south of the city, and the massed troops of five sultanates fell on the undefended capital and put most of its men to the sword, leading the women and craftsmen off to slavery.

    The sculptures were smashed and the buildings of the city were set on fire. Even so, the work of destruction took five months; some say a year. Today Hampi—as Vijayanagara is now known—remains much as it was left: almost deserted, a strange, haunting and otherworldly landscape of massive boulders, dusty red-earth fields and sudden lush green banana plantations. Through all this can be seen the mighty remains of walls, gateways, watchtowers and spectacularly carved temples. It fell, according to Naipaul, because already the Hindu society it embodied had become backward looking and stagnant: it had failed to develop, and in particular had failed to develop the military means to challenge the aggressive Muslim Sultanates that surrounded it.

    The problem is that these ideas rest on a set of assumptions which recent scholarship has done much to undermine. Wagoner, was an important landmark in this process of reinterpretation.

    It was this dress that Abdur Razzak describes in his account of his audience with Devaraya I—and which he compared to the half-naked appearance of the king of Calicut.

    There was a reason for this: the kings of Vijayanagara wanted good relations with their Muslim neighbours, knowing the benefits of being able to draw technology, military techniques and commerce from them. As scholars are now realising, far from being the final, stagnant, backward-looking bastion of Hindu resistance imagined by Naipaul, Vijayanagara had in fact developed in all sorts of unexpected ways, taking on much of the administrative, tax collecting and military methods of the Muslim sultanates that surrounded it—notably stirrups, horseshoes, horse armour and a new type of saddle, all of which allowed Vijayanagara to put into the field an army of fearsome horse archers who could hold at bay those of the Delhi Sultanate, then the most powerful military force in India.

    The Curse of the Hijra

    Indeed Devaraya II is reputed to have employed 10, Muslim horsemen. Only a short time before the Deccani Sultanates turned on Vijayanagara, the Hindu Empire had been a prominent part of a different alliance of Muslim armies that had sacked the Sultanate of Ahmadnagar, when Hindu and Muslim armies stabled their horses in the mosques of the plundered city.

    Vijayanagara was in reality a victim of shifting alliances in Deccani power politics, not a concerted communal campaign by Muslim states intent on wiping out Hinduism from the face of India. The survey has emphasised the degree to which the buildings of sixteenth century Vijayanagara were inspired by the architecture of nearby Muslim sultanates, dropping the traditional trabeate architecture of the Hindu South in favour of the arch and dome of the Islamicate world as well as borrowing such specifics as ground plans and vaulting, plaster-coated masonry and arabesques.

    Moreover, this fruitful interaction between Hindu and Muslim ruled states was very much a two-way traffic. Just as Hindu Vijayanagara was absorbing Islamic influences, so a similar process of hybridity and mutual influence was transforming the nominally Islamic Sultanate of Bijapur.

    In both imperial British and Hindu nationalist historiography, Bijapur has traditionally been seen as one of the violent and iconoclastic Muslim sultanates which united to wipe out Vijayanagara. The mediaeval reality, it seems, was again very different. For Bijapur at this period was dominated by an atmosphere of wild, heterodox sensuality, with its libraries swelling with often heretical texts produced on the intellectual frontier between Islam and Hinduism, much of which leaned heavily on the esoteric scholarship of Vijayanagara.

    He visited both Shaivite temples and the monasteries of the Nath yogis, and knew Sanskrit better than Persian. This picture of Hindu- Muslim hybridity, of Indo-Islamic intellectual and artistic fecundity is important, for it comes in such stark contrast to the received wisdom—articulated most elegantly by Naipaul—that for India the medieval period was a long tale of defeat and destruction. It is significant that all this surprises us quite as much as it does: we are so used to the idea of heavily fortified frontiers between different religions—especially Hinduism and Islam—that a pre-modern attitude that sees a porous interaction across these frontiers takes us aback.

    Certainly, the history of Vijayanagara raises huge and important questions about faith and personal identity in pre- modern India, about how far these were fixed and immutable—or how far they were in fact flexible, tractable, negotiable. The evidence presented by the new work of scholars studying Vijayanagara through many prisms—archaeology and art history as well as documentary and inscriptional evidence—suggests that the borders between Islam and Hinduism in this period are far less clearly defined than we have been conditioned to expect.

    They activated it. To that extent they are responsible. The genie is out of the bag and will be difficult to bottle. Lip-service has its advantages in a democracy. Lip-service is also hypocrisy. A majoritarian savarna Hindu population does not for a moment believe that the idea of India is under fire.

    The Untold History of Hampi

    On the contrary, they believe that the idea of India is on a roll. But this is not because the people have voted to save the idea of India. It will be for local reasons, regional issues, immediate agrarian distress the selling price of sugarcanearithmetic. The majoritarian Indian voter is a veteran of democracy.

    She knows how to extract benefits by changing governments regularly, how to scare and spur the government into some kind of action, especially when elections are round the corner. She uses that Damocles sword for personal gain. This is the majoritarian agenda.

    Eunuch - dream meaning

    This is what people want. Hindu majoritarianism is here to stay because it is who we are, no matter who runs the government. Church attendance collapsed, gay marriage was legalised and a half-Indian gay man was appointed head of state. Patriotism and hyper-nationalism passed into the realm of the uncool, the tacky, something beloved of Third World teenagers and nutty Americans. The new generation in India does not leave anything behind.

    BJP wants us to see Indian Sonia Gandhi as Italian but Canadian Akshay Kumar as Indian

    It carries the past with it. Modi is an instigator in the classic mould. They used free data not to discover the world but the hatred within and pornography.

    Now let have some logical thought on hizra community. Hizra communicaty is not a particular race but mixture of many type of third sex people study some good research over internet and books.

    Also i came across a book which has done thorough research on the third sex person in hindu mythology written by a third sex person to justify their demand for normal human rights. Now add up the arijit comment mentioned above here.


    thoughts on “Seeing eunuch in dream hindu

    1. It is rather grateful for the help in this question, can, I too can help you something?

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *