Braided stream definition


  • Braided River Landforms
  • braided stream
  • 13.4 Stream Types
  • What is a Braided River Landform? A river that has multiple channels flowing downstream is a braided river. These channels may return to the river, or drain into a common body of water. How are Braided Rivers Formed? Braided river formations are common where water flow is slow and there is a build up of sediment in the river.

    This can cause changes in the direction of the river and create new channels. This can occur to form a river delta, which is a form of braided river. They can be found in areas where the land is very flat and the river moves slowly.

    There is usually a buildup of sediment. The water may be shallow with a history of changing its path. Sometimes instead of changing direction, another channel may be formed. Faster moving waters may also create new channels when there is a buildup of sediment in a portion of the river. Traveling by boat is difficult in many parts of the river. In the region where the Brahmaputra and Jamuna Rivers meet in Bangladesh, there is a braided river system draining into Bengal Bay of the Indian Ocean.

    The Brahmaputra and Jamuna rivers are known to change their path as they flow over the land, which can sometimes cause flooding and loss of life and property. The Brahmaputra River is unusual for having a tidal bore, a wave that travels upstream for many miles during the rising tide. It has also been responsible for much loss of life during its history as it changes course, sometimes causing catastrophic flooding. Course changes and the channels of its braided river system are caused by sediment that comes down from the mountains, raising the level of the river.

    The sediment is created from erosion that occurs in the mountains, some of which is man-made. Braided River definition: A river that has 3 or more channels that may come together again, or drain into the same body of water See Also: River and Submit Your Own Landforms We want pictures and location of the lanforms around the world and we need your help. Click get started button below.

    Chapter 13 Streams and Floods The cycle of erosion has some influence on the nature of a stream, but there are several other factors that are important. Youthful streams that are actively down-cutting their channels tend to be relatively straight and are typically ungraded meaning that rapids and falls are common. As shown in Figures They also have steep gradients and steep and narrow V-shaped valleys — in some cases steep enough to be called canyons.

    Figure This stream has a step-pool morphology and a deep bedrock channel. One such environment is in volcanic regions, where explosive eruptions produce large amounts of unconsolidated material that gets washed into streams. The Coldwater River next to Mt. Helens in Washington State is a good example of this Figure Helens, Washington. As you saw in Figure This leads to erosion of the banks on the outside of the curve, deposition on the inside, and formation of a point bar Figure Over time, the sinuosity of the stream becomes increasingly exaggerated, and the channel migrates around within its flood plain, forming a meandering pattern.

    The stream is flowing toward the viewer. The sand and gravel point bar must have formed when the creek was higher and the flow faster than it was when the photo was taken.

    The meander in the middle of the photo has reached the point where the thin neck of land between two parts of the channel is about to be eroded through. When this happens, another oxbow lake will form like the others in the photo. Numerous oxbow lakes are present and another meander cutoff will soon take place.

    This map shows the elevations of Priest Creek in the Kelowna area. The length of the creek between 1, m and 1, m elevation is 2. Use the scale bar to estimate the distance between 1, m and m and then calculate that gradient. Estimate the gradient between and m. At the point where a stream enters a still body of water — a lake or the ocean — sediment is deposited and a delta forms.

    Much of the Fraser delta is very young in geological terms. Shortly after the end of the last glaciation 10, years ago , the delta did not extend past New Westminster. Since that time, all of the land that makes up Richmond, Delta, and parts of New Westminster and south Surrey has formed from sediment from the Fraser River. The land outlined in red has formed over the past 10, years.

    As you saw in Figure This leads to erosion of the banks on the outside of the curve, deposition on the inside, and formation of a point bar Figure Over time, the sinuosity of the stream becomes increasingly exaggerated, and the channel migrates around within its flood plain, forming a meandering pattern. The stream is flowing toward the viewer. The sand and gravel point bar must have formed when the creek was higher and the flow faster than it was when the photo was taken.

    The meander in the middle of the photo has reached the point where the thin neck of land between two parts of the channel is about to be eroded through.

    Braided River Landforms

    When this happens, another oxbow lake will form like the others in the photo. Numerous oxbow lakes are present and another meander cutoff will soon take place. This map shows the elevations of Priest Creek in the Kelowna area. The length of the creek between 1, m and 1, m elevation is 2. Use the scale bar to estimate the distance between 1, m and m and then calculate that gradient. Estimate the gradient between and m.

    braided stream

    At the point where a stream enters a still body of water — a lake or the ocean — sediment is deposited and a delta forms. Much of the Fraser delta is very young in geological terms.

    The water may be shallow with a history of changing its path. Sometimes instead of changing direction, another channel may be formed. Faster moving waters may also create new channels when there is a buildup of sediment in a portion of the river.

    Traveling by boat is difficult in many parts of the river. In the region where the Brahmaputra and Jamuna Rivers meet in Bangladesh, there is a braided river system draining into Bengal Bay of the Indian Ocean.

    13.4 Stream Types

    The Brahmaputra and Jamuna rivers are known to change their path as they flow over the land, which can sometimes cause flooding and loss of life and property. The Brahmaputra River is unusual for having a tidal bore, a wave that travels upstream for many miles during the rising tide. It has also been responsible for much loss of life during its history as it changes course, sometimes causing catastrophic flooding.

    Course changes and the channels of its braided river system are caused by sediment that comes down from the mountains, raising the level of the river. The sediment is created from erosion that occurs in the mountains, some of which is man-made.


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