Punishment katha sinhala


  • CORPORAL PUNISHMENT
  • Ramadan Halaqah 06-10-2017
  • Narada Muni story: Punishing the Evil: Kamsa
  • Marriage 07 Men Are The Protectors Of Women
  • CORPORAL PUNISHMENT

    They are young and old, some with children and some needing help to walk. A quick ear to the conversations flying around indicates that they are largely Tamil speaking. In certain areas, there are Muslim women and in others Sinhalese women, though fewer in number. They are all united in their search for missing loved ones. These women wait for their turn, sometimes for hours, to tell their story before the Presidential Commission to Investigate into Cases of Missing Persons — often referred to as the Commission of Inquiry or COI.

    Since , the COI has been looking into cases of enforced disappearances during the Sri Lankan civil war. It has been mandated to address cases between and The 3-member Commission began hearing complaints in Kilinochchi in January I heard from relations that Army had taken him in and put him in Magazine prison.

    I went there, wrote down his name and asked them to show him to me but they said no such person has been brought there. I then went to Bogambara prison; same reply.

    Welikada prison; same reply. Thalaimannar prison; same reply. I finally reported the incident. Many of the complainants had gone before several state initiatives including previous commissions. The Army stopped my son. I wanted to take him with me, but the Army said they will inquire and send him back, so we trusted what they said. We were taken in a van and dropped at the camp.

    Until now my son is missing. Is is safe with the Army around? Issues were raised as to the independence of this Council and questions still remain as to the nature of the work it set out to do and how this work will support that of the Commission.

    They were coming down the road when they went missing. We were told they are free to move around and to look for him ourselves. We searched first at the Thalaimannar camp and then at the Alayadivembu camp. During our search, we heard that there was a problem between Prabhakaran and Karuna and we were ordered to go home.

    It was a very problematic time; she was taken by force on her way home, by the LTTE in June that year. We were also displaced, but I met her in Kilinochchci; she said she was alright and not to worry about her. She was studying computing under the LTTE. She came home once after being taken. We ended up at Pudumatalan refugee camp. My other daughter got wounded in a shell attack and I went with her to hospital. It was under LTTE control and there was shelling so they shifted us to Mannar hospital for treatment.

    At Omanthai checkpoint, my eldest daughter had surrendered — the village girls had seen and spoken to her. I want her back. Maxwell [Paranagama] said he will check with the hospital records but I have heard nothing.

    Whoever goes on that road, they must pass this area. As you pass the camps and go through the Sinhala area, there are cut outs, road blocks and a Police station. Maoya junction, we were able to search upto there but not further.

    Records showed that my son had signed in at one check point and the police are aware of this incident but no one knows what happened after that. Some make long journeys just to be heard by the Commission and to continue their search for missing loved ones. While many women recount narratives of missing male family members, there are also men who come before the commission in search of missing female family members. I saw her at the Vellipuram but that was the last time.

    I went looking for her when I heard that my child was at the detention camp, my only girl. I want my child back; I plead with you in all affection, please find my child. No, my housing and livelihood can wait — my search is for my child.

    One day, armed Air Force personnel took him away for inquiries — they were in civilian clothing. The next time we went there, we were told he had been taken to the Plantain Point Army Camp but when we inquired there, they denied it.

    Later, officers came home to make inquiries and I went to the 4th Floor for this. I faced so many inquiries yet nothing happened. This has resulted in many families not having a choice and having to accept missing loved ones as dead and requesting that the issuing of the death certificate be expedited to ensure they are able to obtain assistance.

    The economic situation for most families in the North and East is difficult — most work in agriculture and in small shops to make ends meet. Most accept a death certificate purely to receive state social welfare payments that will help them in their daily lives.

    Civil society across Sri Lanka including groups from the North and East have criticized the working methods of the Commission and some have engaged in protests. There have also been several calls to expedite investigations on cases of enforced disappearances. The government mentioned plans to abolish the Commission, but Chairman Maxwell Paranagama has stated that it will continue investigating cases.

    Consultation with civil society and families of the disappeared, essential to making this a victim-centric mechanism of transitional justice, is key but yet to materialize. Up-country Tamils: The Forgotten 4. Once thickly forested and inaccessible to humans, settlements were limited to open valleys and the city of Kandy. The British cleared these acres of virgin forest and, once their experiment with coffee crops failed, began planting tea; the rest is history.

    However, history has and might continue to overlook the most important cogs in the large machine that is the tea industry of Sri Lanka; the people without whose tireless labour this process would grind to a screeching halt — the workers on the tea estates. Over the years, they have been marginalised by the very country that they devote all their energy to. The Sinhala nationalism that fuelled the Ceylon Citizenship Act of set such precise terms of identity that even though they had lived on the island for decades, lack of proper documentation meant they were not recognised as citizens of Sri Lanka and left stateless.

    A handful of agreements between India and Sri Lanka over next few decades laid out plans to repatriate some while granting citizenship to a select few. Finally, it was the J. R Jayawardene government that came into power in the s that revised the Citizenship Act, adding in a Special Provisions in the form of the Grant of Citizenship to Stateless Persons of Indian Origin, accepting all remaining Indian Tamils as citizens of Sri Lanka, equipping them with a nationality and a vote.

    It has been almost years since the first migrant workers made the hill country their home. But is it really a home? These were initially meant to be temporary shelters for the workers yet estate management over the years never sought to develop the living conditions of the workers. Yet the estate worker is not the owner of his house, even though it is that small.

    Should he plant a tree outside the line, even its fruits would technically belong to the estate management. Because of this system, where the housing comes under the control of the management, individual houses are not provided with an address.

    This results in administrative issues, problems for the police and issues during voting. Taking into consideration how important transport is in the tea process, there has been no development of estate roads undertaken by the respective estate management. Walking from their line house to the particular area of the plantation they are required to work at, both places sometimes on two different hills, is laborious enough without the badly-maintained road. Classes in estate schools are limited and students who wish to study further have to go into the main town.

    Hospitals, long since neglected, are not adequate for all emergencies and again, they are forced to resort to services in the town. Access to these are made additionally time-consuming because the roads are so badly damaged and the limited bus services available to estates are irregular.

    Youtube link goes here… Estate schools extend to Grade 5 or Grade 9 in most cases and students who wish to study beyond that resort to making the journey from the estate to the closest city to complete their education. While most schools would employ teachers who are specialists in their subjects to teach children, some of the young women appointed to estate schools only have an Advanced Level qualifications. So, most often, they stop going to school.

    Children start working on the estates early or get married at a young age and have families of their own. These schools are just forgotten. Surgeries and delivery of babies has to be done by trained doctors in a town hospital. I have to take her almost 40 kilometres away to the hospital in the main town at the bottom of the mountain along these roads that are so damaged, the journey will be very uncomfortable for her.

    A single line with five or so houses share a wall and with more than five people living in a single room, contagious diseases spread rapidly. Water distribution in some plantations is such that the same water used by lines higher up the mountain makes its way down a channel to the lower divisions and the individuals there are left having to use water that is far from pure. Even in places where this particular system is not used, irregular water distribution methods and lack of basic hygiene facilities contribute to prevailing health dilemmas.

    The options available to women who wish to work outside the estate are very limited. Their other option is to look for labour work abroad, which they sometimes find difficult to adjust to because of the culture differences. Eventually, most of them return only to marry and begin their own families and start, inevitably, working on the estate.

    Though some do make these journeys, some fall into the cycle of the culture and are married as soon as they come of the legal age. Young brides bear children at a young age and are thereby compelled to stop schooling to take care of and provide for the children.

    This habit has spread among the women too. Because the communities consume illicit alcohol that is not manufactured properly, sickness results. To approach the relevant authorities that could possibly help address their concerns is also difficult for the workers; even though the communities are Tamil, government agents appointed to offices in these areas are mostly Sinhala and the language barrier creates more confusion.

    This is one of the many factors that contribute to lack of proper documentation in the estate communities. Lack of awareness of the administrative procedures due to being cut off from society reinforces these inactions. Tea country is a maze of bushes set on the face of steep mountains, along trails of jagged ground that drop sharply down the slope. The prevailing chill and freezing cold at some times of the year make for a challenging climate on the best of days.

    I receive more than one call from brothers who actually doubting their wives. And now he's saying that I don't trust her anymore.

    What guarantee Do I have now that she's not doing this with somebody else. This is the the engagement period is not a marriage contract. He is not entitled even to touch you. As a matter of fact, after he has taken the decision to engage to you, he is not supposed to see anything from you, but what shows normally, which is the face and the hand and if you are wearing a niqab and the regular pieces in regular basis, he should be seeing you with the niqab.

    And we mentioned that the marriage contract has pillars has conditions and any of these conditions is not fulfilled then the marriage is invalid period. We said one of the duties of the marriage contract is that every element were to nissa asado. We spoke about the seven conditions for the marriage contract. She cannot be pushed into the marriage. She must say if she is previously married. If she's a virgin, she could hint number three, no marriage without hourly.

    No marriage without our Lea. And we stress this human bra. NACA, hot enough, sir. And we spoke about the fact this marriage has to be announced that is number five, this marriage cannot be turned it can cannot be for a duration of time. This will bring you into the area of zamata that you marry just for the intention of getting a green card or the intention of because you're staying here love this marriage from the beginning in your heart.

    This marriage is intended to be forever if it you happen and divorce along the way that happens people divorce, but you cannot enter the marriage with the intention that you want to divorce the woman you can't.

    And what was the last one number seven. If you want to review we have two lectures about the conditions for a valid for a valid marriage contract they are available online. But the question here Why?

    What guarantee Do I have now that she's not doing this with somebody else. This is the the engagement period is not a marriage contract.

    He is not entitled even to touch you. As a matter of fact, after he has taken the decision to engage to you, he is not supposed to see anything from you, but what shows normally, which is the face and the hand and if you are wearing a niqab and the regular pieces in regular basis, he should be seeing you with the niqab. And we mentioned that the marriage contract has pillars has conditions and any of these conditions is not fulfilled then the marriage is invalid period. We said one of the duties of the marriage contract is that every element were to nissa asado.

    We spoke about the seven conditions for the marriage contract. She cannot be pushed into the marriage. She must say if she is previously married.

    If she's a virgin, she could hint number three, no marriage without hourly. Issues were raised as to the independence of this Council and questions still remain as to the nature of the work it set out to do and how this work will support that of the Commission.

    They were coming down the road when they went missing. We were told they are free to move around and to look for him ourselves. We searched first at the Thalaimannar camp and then at the Alayadivembu camp. During our search, we heard that there was a problem between Prabhakaran and Karuna and we were ordered to go home. It was a very problematic time; she was taken by force on her way home, by the LTTE in June that year.

    We were also displaced, but I met her in Kilinochchci; she said she was alright and not to worry about her. She was studying computing under the LTTE. She came home once after being taken. We ended up at Pudumatalan refugee camp.

    My other daughter got wounded in a shell attack and I went with her to hospital. It was under LTTE control and there was shelling so they shifted us to Mannar hospital for treatment. At Omanthai checkpoint, my eldest daughter had surrendered — the village girls had seen and spoken to her. I want her back. Maxwell [Paranagama] said he will check with the hospital records but I have heard nothing. Whoever goes on that road, they must pass this area. As you pass the camps and go through the Sinhala area, there are cut outs, road blocks and a Police station.

    Maoya junction, we were able to search upto there but not further.

    Ramadan Halaqah 06-10-2017

    Records showed that my son had signed in at one check point and the police are aware of this incident but no one knows what happened after that. Some make long journeys just to be heard by the Commission and to continue their search for missing loved ones. While many women recount narratives of missing male family members, there are also men who come before the commission in search of missing female family members. I saw her at the Vellipuram but that was the last time.

    I went looking for her when I heard that my child was at the detention camp, my only girl. I want my child back; I plead with you in all affection, please find my child. No, my housing and livelihood can wait — my search is for my child. One day, armed Air Force personnel took him away for inquiries — they were in civilian clothing.

    Narada Muni story: Punishing the Evil: Kamsa

    The next time we went there, we were told he had been taken to the Plantain Point Army Camp but when we inquired there, they denied it.

    Later, officers came home to make inquiries and I went to the 4th Floor for this. I faced so many inquiries yet nothing happened. This has resulted in many families not having a choice and having to accept missing loved ones as dead and requesting that the issuing of the death certificate be expedited to ensure they are able to obtain assistance.

    The economic situation for most families in the North and East is difficult — most work in agriculture and in small shops to make ends meet. Most accept a death certificate purely to receive state social welfare payments that will help them in their daily lives.

    Civil society across Sri Lanka including groups from the North and East have criticized the working methods of the Commission and some have engaged in protests. There have also been several calls to expedite investigations on cases of enforced disappearances. The government mentioned plans to abolish the Commission, but Chairman Maxwell Paranagama has stated that it will continue investigating cases. Consultation with civil society and families of the disappeared, essential to making this a victim-centric mechanism of transitional justice, is key but yet to materialize.

    Up-country Tamils: The Forgotten 4. Once thickly forested and inaccessible to humans, settlements were limited to open valleys and the city of Kandy.

    The British cleared these acres of virgin forest and, once their experiment with coffee crops failed, began planting tea; the rest is history. However, history has and might continue to overlook the most important cogs in the large machine that is the tea industry of Sri Lanka; the people without whose tireless labour this process would grind to a screeching halt — the workers on the tea estates.

    Over the years, they have been marginalised by the very country that they devote all their energy to. The Sinhala nationalism that fuelled the Ceylon Citizenship Act of set such precise terms of identity that even though they had lived on the island for decades, lack of proper documentation meant they were not recognised as citizens of Sri Lanka and left stateless. A handful of agreements between India and Sri Lanka over next few decades laid out plans to repatriate some while granting citizenship to a select few.

    Marriage 07 Men Are The Protectors Of Women

    Finally, it was the J. R Jayawardene government that came into power in the s that revised the Citizenship Act, adding in a Special Provisions in the form of the Grant of Citizenship to Stateless Persons of Indian Origin, accepting all remaining Indian Tamils as citizens of Sri Lanka, equipping them with a nationality and a vote. It has been almost years since the first migrant workers made the hill country their home. But is it really a home? These were initially meant to be temporary shelters for the workers yet estate management over the years never sought to develop the living conditions of the workers.

    Yet the estate worker is not the owner of his house, even though it is that small. Should he plant a tree outside the line, even its fruits would technically belong to the estate management. Because of this system, where the housing comes under the control of the management, individual houses are not provided with an address.

    This results in administrative issues, problems for the police and issues during voting. Taking into consideration how important transport is in the tea process, there has been no development of estate roads undertaken by the respective estate management. Walking from their line house to the particular area of the plantation they are required to work at, both places sometimes on two different hills, is laborious enough without the badly-maintained road.

    Classes in estate schools are limited and students who wish to study further have to go into the main town. Hospitals, long since neglected, are not adequate for all emergencies and again, they are forced to resort to services in the town. Access to these are made additionally time-consuming because the roads are so badly damaged and the limited bus services available to estates are irregular.

    Youtube link goes here… Estate schools extend to Grade 5 or Grade 9 in most cases and students who wish to study beyond that resort to making the journey from the estate to the closest city to complete their education. While most schools would employ teachers who are specialists in their subjects to teach children, some of the young women appointed to estate schools only have an Advanced Level qualifications.

    So, most often, they stop going to school. Children start working on the estates early or get married at a young age and have families of their own. These schools are just forgotten. Surgeries and delivery of babies has to be done by trained doctors in a town hospital. I have to take her almost 40 kilometres away to the hospital manobo ritual songs the main town at the bottom of the mountain along these roads that are so damaged, the journey will be very uncomfortable for her.

    A single line with five or so houses share a wall and with more than five people living in a single room, contagious diseases spread rapidly. Water distribution in some plantations is such that the same water used by lines higher up the mountain makes its way down a channel to the lower divisions and the individuals there are left having to use water that is far from pure. Even in places where this particular system is not used, irregular water distribution methods and lack of basic hygiene facilities contribute to prevailing health dilemmas.

    The options available to women who wish to work outside the estate are very limited. Their other option is to look for labour work abroad, which they sometimes find difficult to adjust to because of the culture differences. Eventually, most of them return only to marry and begin their own families and start, inevitably, working on the estate. Though some do make these journeys, some fall into the cycle of the culture and are married as soon as they come of the legal age.

    Young brides bear children at a young age and are thereby compelled to stop schooling to take care of and provide for the children.

    This habit has spread among the women too. Because the communities consume illicit alcohol that is not manufactured properly, sickness results. To approach the relevant authorities that could possibly help address their concerns is also difficult for the workers; even though the communities are Tamil, government agents appointed to offices in these areas are mostly Sinhala and the language barrier creates more confusion.

    This is one of the many factors that contribute to lack of proper documentation in the estate communities. Lack of awareness of the administrative procedures due to being cut off from society reinforces these inactions.

    Tea country is a maze of bushes set on the face of steep mountains, along trails of jagged ground that drop sharply down the slope.


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