6g72 engine problems


  • Mitsubishi Pajero Montero
  • The Tale of the Worst Car in LeMons History, Part 3
  • Mitsubishi Pajero NK 3.0 Litre Engine: 6G72 – CYLINDER HEAD GASKETS
  • Mitsubishi Triton MK 2005 – 6G72 V6 3.0L Petrol – Miss firing
  • Eclipse, Galant, Stratus 3.0L V6 Limitations
  • The Most Common Problems on Early Mitsubishi Delicas
  • Mitsubishi Pajero Montero

    Both, however, have had model years prone to engine issues , as well as other problems. And neither are alternative off-roaders like Japanese vans. The Mitsubishi Delica is a prominent Japanese van in the overlanding scene. But, although it offers quite a few cool features, it also has its share of flaws.

    Autotrader reports the L was available with both a gasoline and diesel engine and in one of two wheelbase lengths. Gear Patrol notes it has seating for 7, with swiveling, 2nd-row seats.

    There was also a Mitsubishi Delica Chamonix, named for a French ski area, designed for colder climates. In place of the skylights, it had additional roof insulation, as well as dual batteries, a beefed-up alternator, and waterproof carpets.

    It also came with a limited-slip rear differential. However, Overland Way reports the van offers a proper two-speed transfer case and locking center differential. Nevertheless, if you are interested in the Mitsubishi Delica, there are some issues that can crop up. Although diesels, in general, are fairly durable , they also make less power than similar-sized gasoline engines. The excess heat then leads to the cylinder heads and head gaskets cracking and failing.

    In addition, the 4D56 is an interference engine. Balance shafts are common in many smaller engines to help decrease engine vibrations.

    Finally, users on the Cummins diesel forums claimed that Mitsubishi diesel engines, as a whole, can suffer turbo failure. Can these issues be repaired? Fortunately, many of these issues are fixable if caught in time. ItStillRuns reports that symptoms of cracked heads include oil and coolant leaks, misfires, as well as white exhaust smoke.

    The same issue applies to the brakes. If the turbochargers fail, it is possible to purchase rebuild kits for them. In addition, several owners simply upgraded their Delicas with better turbos, which also boost performance.

    Forum users report that the Mitsubishi diesel engine has a specially-built failure point. Rather than the valve stems bending, as in the Montero, the valve rocker arms will break instead, sparing the engine from internal damage. Follow more updates from MotorBiscuit on our Facebook page.

    The Tale of the Worst Car in LeMons History, Part 3

    Our car experts choose every product we feature. We may earn money from the links on this page. The car broke down repeatedly on this drive and had to be towed the final odo clicks.

    Once again, optimism flourished in opposition to even slightly rational thought. For a very brief moment, the Reliant was slightly quick on the race track, making the occasional pass when the opportunity presented.

    Could this be the race? Fortunately for Sputnik Racing, the Mitsubishi 6G72 V-6 went into dozens of Chrysler and Mitsubishi products during the period beginning in the late s, and cheap self-service wrecking yards have an excellent selection available.

    With minutes to go before the checkered flag and the engine finally buttoned up, Sasha discovered that the junkyard engine had a broken timing belt. The Slant-Six -powered Dodge was running fine, but the 6Gpowered Plymouth had engine trouble: one engine with a thrown rod, another with a busted timing belt, a bad oil pan, and nobody know what else. Excellent plan! The better of the two bad oil pans got a crude-but-effective patch job.

    The night before the race, an allegedly good 3. Then, of course, nothing worked. Once again, the K-car subjected the rest of the field to a lengthy oil-cleanup delay. A triumph for Escape Velocity Racing, but the Reliant finished just two laps—its worst performance of the season.

    However, what it ended up getting was an mile tow back to NSF headquarters in Florida, where DC Doug and the NSF-ers had just enough time to deal with the dead engine before trying to persuade the Reliant to drive to New Hampshire under its own power. Again, the abundance of unloved vehicles with Mitsubishi 6G72 V-6 engines proves helpful, and DC Doug scorned the junkyard in favor of a complete, running, grandma-grade Chrysler LeBaron sedan.

    Speaker wire, Romex , CAT5 cables , wire taps, hot blade connectors dangling in space, Scotch Tape used as insulation, washers with twisted wires used as ring connectors, every one of the nine circles of Wiring Hell. The most pressing, showstopping-est electrical problem had to be the lack of voltage regulation for the tormented Nippondenso alternator.

    Chryslers with the 6G72 engine used the engine computer to control the alternator, but all the ECU wiring had become such a bewildering tangle by that time, that nobody could figure it out. Instead, NSF Racing team captain Bob Mitchell dug through some greasy boxes of discarded Chrysler parts and produced a battered voltage regulator from a Dodge Dart, hooked it up to what everyone hoped was the field-coil connector on the alternator, and called it good. It seemed to work, sort of. Good enough for the K!

    Fiddling with sketchy wiring while standing on a highway shoulder with wheelers roaring by a few feet away had become normal for these guys by this time, and they showed up to the track a mere single day late. Handing the car over to the Nobel laureates of Rally Baby Racing.

    Doug and Steve breathed a sigh of relief that the K was back in such capable hands. Not very shockingly, the K continued to suffer from sputtering part-throttle crapouts during its weekend of racing at NHMS. Since the K had beaten 12 other teams in its P finish, the members of Rally Baby felt that the Index of Effluency bar should be lowered to accommodate this not-bad-for-this-car achievement.

    Like a befuddled lab rat who keeps choosing the path in the maze that leads to painful electrical shocks instead of the one that leads to the cheese, Steve McDaniel refused to learn from past experience. State Trooper: You cannot operate this vehicle in the state of New Jersey. Steve: No, sir. Steve: I guesstimate. Steve: Yes, sir. Trooper: Excellent. After 20 minutes of running the info on the car and myself and consulting with two other carloads of local PD, he came back to the window.

    Trooper: Alright, get this piece of shit out of New Jersey. Steve: Sir, yes, sir! Thank you, sir! Trooper: Drive safely, and try not to make too much noise. Following that incident, the K ran well enough for its drive to Wisconsin. They spent Friday at the track, untangling some of the miles of bad wiring, replacing the throttle body, swapping out nearly all the brake components, and many more fixes.

    The car seemed to be running better than ever—but then legions of K-It-FWD racers had convinced themselves of the same thing at previous races. When the race started, something completely unexpected happened: The Reliant ran beautifully, turning quick laps with none of the breakdowns and minute driver changes of past races.

    LeMons officials had been telling K-It-FWD racers all year that a top-half finish meant a near-certain Index of Effluency win, and so Team Majicbus just had to finish 37th or better to reach that goal. After peaking at P4, the K started with the usual fuel-starvation issues, and then the shifter linkage stopped working.

    He installed a heater a Toyota Supra heater core and blower, sitting on the passenger-side floor and headed west. Naturally, the K stranded him on the highway in Nebraska. First, though, we had to re-theme the car! We knew this might attract bad attention in heavily-armed and humor-challenged places such as Wyoming and Utah, but at this point we were much more worried about the heavy snow and falling temperatures along our route.

    We had to make good time. We had to spend the night in Rawlins, but first we had to fix the cars. Very quickly, this road trip became one of the most miserable of my life. The lowlight may have been the sudden electrical-system death immobilizing the K in the middle of a huge patch of black ice on I near Rock Springs.

    With wheelers skidding by, air horns blaring, we attempted to jump-start the Reliant. Fortunately, the LeMons community came to the rescue, and Salt Lake City—based Stick Figure Racing creators of two twin-engined Toyotas showed up with their tow rig and trailer to rescue the now-hopeless K.

    In a staggering display of generosity, Stick Figure Racing loaned their rig and trailer to Mike for the duration of the race weekend, miles to the west. I had to get to the track to help set up the race and the Donner Pass would be snowed shut any minute, so I roared off into the sunset in my horsepower wagon and left those fools to their own devices. I was there, but where were the K and the Checker? Late on Saturday, a tremendous cheer broke out from the direction of the Sonoma Raceway front gates.

    The Reliant had made it! Build-Race-Party himself, Bill Caswell , had joined the caravan in Barstow and helped spell the exhausted drivers on the way back north.

    For those who had raced on K-It-FWD teams during the season, the season-ending race was to be a K reunion, with participants from all over the country flying into California to build, race, and party. The next day, the Reliant hit the famous Sears Point track and looked pretty good out there. In the end, the team finished out of entries, nearly squeaking into the top two-thirds of the standings. The plan at the beginning of the year was to crush the K after the season, donating the scrap value to charity.

    In the final analysis, were the travel miles more than enough to circumnavigate the globe , tens of thousands of dollars in fuel and parts, busted knuckles, broken hearts, and general death-marchiness of the K-It-FWD experience worth it?

    Continue the story: Part 1 Part 2 Many, many generous K-It-FWD participants helped me create this chronicle by sending me their stories and photographs. This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses.

    You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.

    Mitsubishi Pajero NK 3.0 Litre Engine: 6G72 – CYLINDER HEAD GASKETS

    Autotrader reports the L was available with both a gasoline and diesel engine and in one of two wheelbase lengths. Gear Patrol notes it has seating for 7, with swiveling, 2nd-row seats.

    Mitsubishi Triton MK 2005 – 6G72 V6 3.0L Petrol – Miss firing

    There was also a Mitsubishi Delica Chamonix, named for a French ski area, designed for colder climates. In place of the skylights, it had additional roof insulation, as well as dual batteries, a beefed-up alternator, and waterproof carpets.

    It also came with a limited-slip rear differential. However, Overland Way reports the van offers a proper two-speed transfer case and locking center differential. Nevertheless, if you are interested in the Mitsubishi Delica, there are some issues that can crop up. Although diesels, in general, are fairly durablethey also make less power than similar-sized gasoline engines. Chryslers with the 6G72 engine used the engine computer to control the alternator, but all the ECU wiring had become such a bewildering tangle by that time, that nobody could figure it out.

    Instead, NSF Racing team captain Bob Mitchell dug through some greasy boxes of discarded Chrysler parts and produced a battered voltage regulator from a Dodge Dart, hooked it up to what everyone hoped was the field-coil connector on the alternator, and called it good.

    It seemed to work, sort of. Good enough for the K! Fiddling with sketchy wiring while standing on a highway shoulder with wheelers roaring by a few feet away had become normal for these guys by this time, and they showed up to the track a mere single day late.

    Handing the car over to the Nobel laureates of Rally Baby Racing. Doug and Steve breathed a sigh of relief that the K was back in such capable hands. Not very shockingly, the K continued to suffer from sputtering part-throttle crapouts during its weekend of racing at NHMS. Since the K had beaten 12 other teams in its P finish, the members of Rally Baby felt that the Index of Effluency bar should be lowered to accommodate this not-bad-for-this-car achievement. Like a befuddled lab rat who keeps choosing the path in the maze that leads to painful electrical shocks instead of the one that leads to the cheese, Steve McDaniel refused to learn from past experience.

    State Trooper: You cannot operate this vehicle in the state of New Jersey.

    Eclipse, Galant, Stratus 3.0L V6 Limitations

    Steve: No, sir. Steve: I guesstimate. Steve: Yes, sir. Trooper: Excellent. After 20 minutes of running the info on the car and myself and consulting with two other carloads of local PD, he came back to the window.

    Trooper: Alright, get this piece of shit out of New Jersey. Steve: Sir, yes, sir! Thank you, sir! Trooper: Drive safely, and try not to make too much noise. Following that incident, the K ran well enough for its drive to Wisconsin.

    They spent Friday at the track, untangling some of the miles of bad wiring, replacing the throttle body, swapping out nearly all the brake components, and many more fixes. The car seemed to be running better than ever—but then legions of K-It-FWD racers had convinced themselves of the same thing at previous races.

    We have had a lot of them and we have over the years gotten to know them well. This article covers mostly the 90s 2nd gen Mitsubishi Pajero, just because thats the model we have owned the most. Off road cars There is a lot of brands out there who makes off road vehicles.

    The Most Common Problems on Early Mitsubishi Delicas

    Nowadays there are more city SUVs than pure off road vehicles on the roads. But in the 90s car makers where building proper off road vehicles. The Mitsubishi Pajero for instance has rear diff lock as standard which is pretty unusual. Japanese brands There is a number of Japanese car manufactures and most of them have their own off road model. Japanese brands in general are well known for good reliability and simple mechanics. They have probably improved a lot in recent years though.

    But overall if you are looking for a car that is low in maintenance you go for a Japanese brand. Famous japanese off roaders is Toyota, Nissan, Suzuki and Mitsubishi. Most famous for reliability is Toyota. This is where the Mitsubishi Pajero comes in. They are cheaper to buy and offers the same features as the Toyotas. But is there a reason that they are cheaper?


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