Isaac luria quotes


  • Isaac Luria and Kabbalah in Safed
  • What is Tzimtzum?
  • ABRAHAM BEN ELIEZER HA-LEVI BERUKHIM To ABRAHAM BEN N… HA-BAGHDADI (Jews and Judaism)
  • New book offers kabalistic view of the Torah
  • Isaac Luria and Kabbalah in Safed

    Born in Morocco, he immigrated to Palestine probably before Vital quotes Luria as saying that in the "origins of the souls of the Safed kabbalists," Abraham derived from the patriarch Jacob. Abraham was a visionary and ascetic, who preached piety and morality, and called for repentance. He was called the "great patron of the Sabbath" and he went out on Friday mornings to the markets and streets to urge the householders to hurry with the preparations for the Sabbath meals and close their shops early so that they would have time to purify themselves for the Sabbath.

    Almost nothing is known about his life. His Tikkunei Shabbat were printed at the end of Reshit Hokhmah ha-Kazar Venice, and thereafter in numerous editions as a separate book. On the other hand, his HHasidut, containing the rules of pious behavior which he established for his group in Safed, circulated in manuscript even in the Diaspora, and was published by Solomon Schechter Studies in Judaism, 2nd Series , It is not clear whether he was the author of Gallei Rezayya, parts of which were published in his name It is probable that Tobiah ha-Levi, author of Hlen Tov, was his son.

    Solomon Zalman, "the Vilna Gaon. He had a strikingly critical approach to history and literature. His work Rav Pealim , an alphabetical index of all the midrashic works known to him, contains critical observations on Midrashim. He composed commentaries on several tractates ofthe Talmud and on Midrash Rabbah, glosses and notes to the Jerusalem Talmud, a book on weights and measures in the Talmud, another on place-names mentioned in Talmud and Midrash, and several other works, some unpublished.

    Abraham was active in communal affairs and was one of the parnasim of the Vilna Jewish community. His verse follows the genre of Spanish poetry in its meter, style, and content.

    Tovi published his poems in Their subjects include moral and ethical exhortations, songs for weddings and circumcisions, religious verse, and hymns for special occasions and festivals. If he is identical with the person of the same name mentioned in the Sefer ha-Musar pp.

    Abraham b. H ayyim at times represented the Lublin community in the assemblies of the Council of Four Lands. From to he acted as parnas of the Council, an office previously held by his grandfather, Abraham Abele b. During Abraham b. Other members of his family served in several communities as rabbis or communal leaders. Abraham was described by contemporaries as "princely and munificent," but nothing is now known of his occupation.

    He died in Lublin at an advanced age. In the colophon, the proofreader Joseph H ayyim praises Abraham as "unequaled in the realm of Hebrew printing and celebrated everywhere. The edition of the Psalms, with R. Abraham is probably identical with Abraham the Pious he-H asid or he-Haver referred to frequently by his friend Abraham b. Moses b. In Abraham b. Hillel, Maimonides, and other rabbis signed a takkanah to safeguard the observance of the laws of family purity in Egypt Maimonides, Teshuvot Responsa , ed.

    Freimann , Megillat Zuta is written in rhymed prose with a prologue and epilogue in metered verse. The number of manuscripts extant seems to attest the popularity of the work, which was first published by Neubauer jqr, 8 , ff.

    Abraham and Josiah b. Moses verified a responsum by Jehiel? Eliakim Fostat, which deals with the controversy concerning the reference, in legal documents and during prayers, to the person of the reigning nagid. Gerondi later enlarged on this teaching and introduced it into his own order of the prayers. Abraham" was not published until see Scholem in bibl. It is as yet unclear whether other hymns signed Abraham b. Isaac Hazzan are wholly or in part his work, or whether they were composed by another writer of the same name.

    The text of this edition is significantly different from later ones. No other book that came from his press is known. His father Isaac ha-Kohen b. Joseph was the gaon in Palestine. Abraham held a high position in the government and was probably one of the court physicians. He may also have been president of the Jewish community; hence his honorary title "prince of the community".

    Apart from his general scholarship, Abraham also appears to have been learned in the Talmud. His erudition, nobility of character, and philanthropy are lauded in several poems and letters found in the Cairo Genizah. Abraham served for a short period as head of the bet din in Tarlow, but, as he was extremely wealthy, he was able to resign his position and in returned to Zamosc, his birthplace.

    There he occupied himself with both religious and secular studies. He knew German, Polish, and Latin. In he participated in the conference held at Constantinov where he was a signatory to the ban passed there on the printers of the Sulzbach Talmud. From this time, he played an active role in Polish Jewish life and became widely known. Beit Abraham, his book of responsa and talmudic novellae, was printed in ; the book contained also the novellae of his father Isaac b. Abraham ha-Kohen, as well as his own hal-akhic novellae.

    Nothing is known of his life or of the era to which he belongs. Isaac of Granada. However, only the first ten ways were printed, and this only in a very corrupt form Amsterdam, : H. The actual content of this work is very enigmatic as, in many respects, its symbolism and mysticism do not correspond with the conventional Kabbalah. The few clear passages reveal the author as a profound thinker and visionary. Cordovero wrote a lengthy commentary on part of the book.

    Isaac of Narbonne, author of Eshkol, and in doing so he tried to date the Berit Menuhah two centuries earlier, however, his argument is not tenable. Little is known of his life. He was born in Montpellier about , and toward the end of his life settled in Carpentras. Isaac was known for his liberal outlook. Abraham wrote a commentary on most of the Talmud, based principally on the views of Maimonides.

    He gives a brief commentary on the text in the style of Rashi; at the end of each topic he gives the practical halakhah derived from it. Only a minor part of this commentary has been published, including his commentary on Kiddushin appearing in the Romm edition of the Talmud wrongly ascribed to Isaac of Dampierre and those on Yevamot, Nedarim, and Nazir New York, In addition to those which appear at the end of his commentary to Nazir there are those which appear in Teshuvot Hakhmei Provinzyah , ed.

    Abraham of Montpellier. It is strange that he does not mention in his works the names of any scholars after Moses b. Jacob of Lunel. Barzillai al-Bargeloni. David of Posquieres, who became his son-in-law. Barzillai al-Bargeloni, with additions from Rashi, R. Tam and his contemporaries, and Abraham himself. In the main, he omitted the geonic responsa and those of Alfasi. As most of the Ittim was lost, the Eshkol took on additional significance, in that it rescued a part, at least, of the extensive source material in the Sefer ha-Ittim.

    The very ambitious enterprise of excerpting Judah b. Jacob, who encouraged the introduction of Spanish halakhah and tradition into Narbonne.

    The ensuing controversy was inconclusive. Although there are no grounds for accusing Auerbach of willfully tampering with the manuscript, the version of the Eshkol that Albeck had in hand is undoubtedly the authentic one. Abraham played a vital role as the principal channel through which the Spanish traditions passed into Provence and from there to northern France.

    At the same time, he emphasized the local traditions of the "Elders of Narbonne," of which he also made great use. His eclecticism is clear from the fact that he also gave due consideration to north-French halakhic traditions, using his personal authority to decide between the various traditions.

    Abraham was the recipient of numerous queries. A collection of his responsa has been published ed. Kafah, Jerusalem, and another is extant in the Guenzburg Collection. Several of the responsa were published by S. Assaf in Sifran shel Rishonim , and in Sinai, 11 He also excerpted Judah b. He resided in Leghorn and Trieste but finally settled in Ferrara where he remained 30 years.

    He was known as an ascetic who frequently fasted an entire week and studied six days and nights consecutively. He would purchase rabbinic works and distribute them to needy scholars. It was believed in Ferrara that his profound piety more than once saved the Jewish community from disaster.

    Among his publications are Likkutei Amarim "Gleanings," Zolkiev, , which include a commentary on the Pirkei Shirah and extracts from kabbalistic works, and Devar ha-Melekh Leghorn, on the commandments. Abraham was renowned for his asceticism, fasting during the week and eating only on the Sabbath. He settled in Jerusalem shortly after

    What is Tzimtzum?

    Mulder : Very Old Testament. Scully : Yeah. But with a new twist. Scully : Interesting in that they belong to Isaac Luria. Mulder : Spectral figures are not often known to leave fingerprints. Casper never did. And we have been asked to prove how.

    Jacob Weiss David Groh : When we called the police, they said that there was nothing to worry about. That we were paranoid. They always say that when someone threatens the Jews. Mulder : So there was a specific threat of violence? Jacob: The threat is always there. Ariel Luria Justine Miceli : Do what you feel is necessary. But leave us alone. Let us mourn in peace. Scully : Justice or revenge?

    Curt Brunjes Jonathan Whittaker : Well sure I knew him, the man owned the store right across the street. Brunjes: Well, you know how they are. Always trying to find ways to make money off of honest folks who work for a living.

    Mulder : Can you think of anyone who might have held a grudge? Mulder : Did you? Brunjes: Why? Scully : No, not directly. But these young men are. And we have reason to believe that you know them. Brunjes: What kind of Jew trick is this?

    Mulder : A Jew pulled it off 2,00 years ago. Clinton Bascombe Jabin Litwiniec : Are you sure about this? Derick Banks Channon Roe : I heard them, man. Mulder : I think they came here because they were afraid. Brunjes: I never told you to kill anyone.

    I never said to do that. Derick: No? Hide back here in the dark, licking envelopes like you? Derick: The truth? Mulder : Is there anything that distinguishes this particular Sepher Yetzirah from other such books? Scully : A name? Kenneth Ungar: Yes, a Hebrew name. Jacob Weiss. Ariel: It was a communal wedding ring made in Kolin, a village near Prague. My father was an apprentice to the man who designed it. Ariel: Every woman who got married in the synagogue wore this ring as a symbol that she was a queen, her husband a king, and the home they made a castle—not only on their wedding day but for the rest of their lives together.

    But most of those lives ended in one day in the spring of Nine thousand Jews were massacred after digging their own graves. Scully : But your father survived. He had small fingers to make bullets at a munitions factory. Scully : And through all this, he hid the ring? Ariel: Even after the war, he hid it. Even from my mother. Ariel: They say you confessed. Why are you doing this? Jacob: To protect you. Ariel: From what? Jacob: I think you know. Kenneth Ungar: The early cabalists, they believed that a righteous man could actually create a living being from the earth itself, fashioned from mud or clay.

    But this creature could only be brought to life by the power of the word. Scully : Oh my god. It was love. Jacob: The boys that killed him, their hate took him from you. And you tried bringing him back with your love.

    It has no place among the living.

    Some of the mystical explanations require understanding of the rabbinic use of notarikon, a linguistic wordplay in which each letter of a Hebrew word stands for a full word, something akin to an acronym in the English language. Gd 16 laws, observing that Esau had a murderous character and Ishmael an adulterous one, explains this verse using the kabbalistic concepts of a good and evil side and arrives at an answer counterintuitive to Jewish morals.

    Similarly, he explains Genesisthe introductory line to the story of Jacob blessing his sons, by examining the root of the Hebrew word for blessing, B-R-CH. Heller mystically interprets the tents and Jacob to mean the tents of the Tabernacle and the living person Jacob as referring to our world, the lower world and externalization since they are both visible, whereas dwellings and Israel refer to the upper world and internalization since they are both invisible.

    That unification occurs here, in the conception of the way in which mankind can undo the damage done in the Creation, can repair the shevirah—through tikkun olam [repairing the world].

    For Luria and his followers, tikkun had a very specific meaning. Every time that a human performs a mitzvah commandmentshe raises one of the holy sparks out of the hands of the forces of evil and restores it to the upper world.

    Conversely, every time that a human sins, a divine spark plunges down. The day will come, if all do their part, when the entire remaining supply of Divine Light will be restored to the upper world; without access to the Divine Light, evil will be unable to survive and will crumble away to dust. Forget to say the blessing over bread? You have contributed to universal evil. Put up a mezuzah on the door of your new house? You have helped to redeem the entire world. Clearly, the act of repairing the world is arrogated to the Jewish people exclusively in this system.

    When God chose the Jewish nation and they heard the Revelation at Sinai, it became their task to restore the world. No days off, no respite, a hard battle to live by the Commandments and to repair the world. He may also have been president of the Jewish community; hence his honorary title "prince of the community".

    Apart from his general scholarship, Abraham also appears to have been learned in the Talmud. His erudition, nobility of character, and philanthropy are lauded in several poems and letters found in the Cairo Genizah. Abraham served for a short period as head of the bet din in Tarlow, but, as he was extremely wealthy, he was able to resign his position and in returned to Zamosc, his birthplace. There he occupied himself with both religious and secular studies.

    He knew German, Polish, and Latin. In he participated in the conference held at Constantinov where he was a signatory to the ban passed there on the printers of the Sulzbach Talmud. From this time, he played an active role in Polish Jewish life and became widely known. Beit Abraham, his book of responsa and talmudic novellae, was printed in ; the book contained also the novellae of his father Isaac b. Abraham ha-Kohen, as well as his own hal-akhic novellae.

    Nothing is known of his life or of the era to which he belongs. Isaac of Granada. However, only the first ten ways were printed, and this only in a very corrupt form Amsterdam, : H. The actual content of this work is very enigmatic as, in many respects, its symbolism and mysticism do not correspond with the conventional Kabbalah. The few clear passages reveal the author as a profound thinker and visionary. Cordovero wrote a lengthy commentary on part of the book. Isaac of Narbonne, author of Eshkol, and in doing so he tried to date the Berit Menuhah two centuries earlier, however, his argument is not tenable.

    Little is known of his life. He was born in Montpellier aboutand toward the end of his life settled in Carpentras.

    Isaac was known for his liberal outlook. Abraham wrote a commentary on most of the Talmud, based principally on the views of Maimonides. He gives a brief commentary on the text in the style of Rashi; at the end of each topic he gives the practical halakhah derived from it.

    Only a minor part of this commentary has been published, including his commentary on Kiddushin appearing in the Romm edition of the Talmud wrongly ascribed to Isaac of Dampierre and those on Yevamot, Nedarim, and Nazir New York, In addition to those which appear at the end of his commentary to Nazir there are those which appear in Teshuvot Hakhmei Provinzyahed.

    Abraham of Montpellier. It is strange that he does not mention in his works the names of any scholars after Moses b. Jacob of Lunel. Barzillai al-Bargeloni. David of Posquieres, who became his son-in-law. Barzillai al-Bargeloni, with additions from Rashi, R.

    Tam and his contemporaries, and Abraham himself. In the main, he omitted the geonic responsa and those of Alfasi.

    As most of the Ittim was lost, the Eshkol took on additional significance, in that it rescued a part, at least, of the extensive source material in the Sefer ha-Ittim.

    The very ambitious enterprise of excerpting Judah b. Jacob, who encouraged the introduction of Spanish halakhah and tradition into Narbonne. The ensuing controversy was inconclusive. Although there are no grounds for accusing Auerbach of willfully tampering with the manuscript, the version of the Eshkol that Albeck had in hand is undoubtedly the authentic one. Abraham played a vital role as the principal channel through which the Spanish traditions passed into Provence and from there to northern France.

    At the same time, he emphasized the local traditions of the "Elders of Narbonne," of which he also made great use. His eclecticism is clear from the fact that he also gave due consideration to north-French halakhic traditions, using his personal authority to decide between the various traditions. Abraham was the recipient of numerous queries.

    A collection of his responsa has been published ed. Kafah, Jerusalem, and another is extant in the Guenzburg Collection. Several of the responsa were published by S.

    Assaf in Sifran shel Rishonimand in Sinai, 11 He also excerpted Judah b. He resided in Leghorn and Trieste but finally settled in Ferrara where he remained 30 years. He was known as an ascetic who frequently fasted an entire week and studied six days and nights consecutively. He would purchase rabbinic works and distribute them to needy scholars.

    It was believed in Ferrara that his profound piety more than once saved the Jewish community from disaster. Among his publications are Likkutei Amarim "Gleanings," Zolkiev,which include a commentary on the Pirkei Shirah and extracts from kabbalistic works, and Devar ha-Melekh Leghorn, on the commandments. Abraham was renowned for his asceticism, fasting during the week and eating only on the Sabbath. He settled in Jerusalem shortly after Ten years later he returned to Europe as an emissary to collect funds on behalf of the rabbis of Jerusalem, and was then involved in a number of disputes with them regarding these collections.

    He traveled extensively and is known to have been in Nice for four years, in Ferrara where he met Graziadio NeppiGlogau, Berlin, and Warsaw. Wherever he went, he exhorted the Jewish community to repentance and good deeds and encouraged more intensive communal activity, including the building of synagogues. On his return to Jerusalem he was arrested and held ransom for the failure of the Jewish community to pay taxes. He died in prison, probably as a result of maltreatment.

    Abraham, son of the rabbi of Zlotow, was apparently wealthy and engaged in trade. He presided over the Council as parnas in and He also served as neeman "treasurer" of the Council during his last term as parnas and later in the s and s. The Council of the Four Lands was drawn into this controversy which stirred the Jewish world.

    Abraham, who was then serving his second term as parnas of the Council, tried to settle the dispute without taking a definite side. His brothers, especially Moses, lived in Lissa and also took part in the leadership of the community. The family was renowned for its wealth, its strong principles, and its charitableness.

    ABRAHAM BEN ELIEZER HA-LEVI BERUKHIM To ABRAHAM BEN N… HA-BAGHDADI (Jews and Judaism)

    The sources do not indicate their means of livelihood but it is likely that they were merchants. Judah b. According to A. Abraham was one of the leaders of the Karaite communities of Lithuania and one of the signatories to the decisions of their assemblies. His writings include 1 Beit Avraham, a collection of mystical treatises; 2 Beit ha-Ozar, a medical work completed in manuscript in St.

    Petersburg, Evr. Vilna, vol. Josiah Yerushalmi. The agnomen Yerushalmi probably indicates that his father, Josiah, made the pilgrimage to Jerusalem. His religious philosophical treatise Emunah Omen, written in pub.

    Eupatoria,dealt with the following subjects: the divine origin and eternity of the Torah; which religion is the true one, the Karaite or the Rabbanite? Abraham defended the Karaite conception of the Torah, arguing that the differences between the rabbinic and Karaite views about fulfillment of the commandments are insignificant.

    He shows respect for the talmu-dic authorities and later Rabbanite scholars with whose work he was well acquainted. Although opposed to the study of secular sciences except in the service of the TorahAbraham was familiar with both Karaite and Rabbanite philosophical and scientific literature. Abraham was the grandfather of Benjamin b. In his main work Yesod Mikra, a commentary of the Bible, Abraham quotes Rabbanite as well as Karaite authorities and refrains from polemics against the Rabbanites.

    It is preserved in two manuscripts Jewish Theological Seminary and Leyden both transcribed by his grandson Judah b. Elijah Tishbi in andrespectively. Fifteen liturgical poems by Abraham are included in the Karaite prayer book.

    New book offers kabalistic view of the Torah

    Inhe finished his quadripartite theological tome entitled Even Shetiyyah "Foundation Stone" "in the house of my master … Don Hasdai Crescas. Elijah, founder of the Damascus yeshivah, a continuation of the Palestinian yeshivah. In Abraham succeeded his father as head of the Egyptian rabbinate. His son-in-law, the physician Hayyim b. A collection of brief decisions and rules entitled Gan ha-Melekh was printed at the end of Ginnat Veradim. His remaining works, consisting of Bible commentaries, sermons, and eulogies, have remained in manuscript.

    He was an exceptionally gifted child as his father himself testifies: Of the affairs of this world I have no consolation, save in two things: preoccupation with my studies and the fact that God has bestowed upon my son Abraham, grace and blessings similar to those he gave to him whose name he bears [i.

    Baneth, p. He studied rabbinics, and possibly philosophy and medicine, with his father, who groomed him from childhood by having him attend his audience chamber.


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