Refrigerant receiver capacity chart


  • Vol 19 – Liquid Line Receivers
  • refrigerant receiver capacity calculation
  • Subcooling
  • So I get this question a lot from newer and some older techs a lot so I went on a quest to try and gather some info to share with them. I came up pretty dry actually, there are a couple of really great spread sheets out there that are for massive systems, but not much for the smaller stuff. It is not even particularly easy to find out how much a receiver holds which I found kind of odd in this day and age.

    Being kind of old school, whipping the calculator out and punching in the size and density gets me there, but it should be easier. So I made up a small spreadsheet that does all the math in hidden cells that will give me an approximate number quick and easy.

    Goes from diameter to R2, then from in3 to ft3, then the density at 90 which is the ahri standard but a lot of the gas companies only make the 75 degree number readily available, go figure. There are a lot of quick answers on the line sets but needed to be able to calc the condenser tubes for the low ambient applications as well. I didn't bother with the evap or suction side of things as it is not a lot and the max so to speak is the pump down holding capacity so it is more of a "less than" result.

    One other doughnut in the middle of it all, when I checked it against a few mfg specs there were a few minor differences that look like just a bit of rounding in the formulas.

    This happens if you try and use "additional line numbers" for things like the condenser calcs. Anyway, did I completely waste my time and there IS an app for it? I looked pretty hard for one and came up blank.

    Receiver is a storage vessel designed to hold excess refrigerant which is not in circulation. Refrigeration systems exposed to varying heat loads, or systems utilizing a condenser flooding valve to maintain a minimum head pressure during low ambient temperatures will need a receiver to store excess refrigerant. Due to density difference during cycle operation, liquid refrigerant is accumulated at the bottom of the receiver and remaining volume is occupied by the vapor refrigerant.

    Receiver also acts as a reservoir during system pump down. How does a Receiver work and serve the purpose? The vapour will be always at the top and liquid at the bottom of the Receiver. The outlet connection of the Receiver is through a dip tube of which the pickup point is at the lowest level of Receiver. This dip tube will always pick up only liquid from the bottom of the Receiver.

    The receiver is installed in the liquid line i. It is installed between the condenser and the liquid line filter drier. What are the different types of Receivers available in Dry All product range? We have both Vertical and Horizontal type Receivers. How do you select a Receiver Model?

    For example, if the refrigerant charge is 10 Kg, the receiver should have holding capacity of 11Kg. One has to also consider the Condensor size while calculating the receiver volume. Receiver inlet and outlet connection sizes should be in-line with the system liquid line tubing sizes.

    Please consult the Dry All team before selecting the model. In what capacity range are Dry All Receivers available? Customized models are available from 1 Litre — 50 Litre capacity. Please refer Dry All catalog for more details. We have Receivers available with MWP ranging from 31 bar — 45 bar. Models ranging from 15 Litre to 25 Litre come with sight glass. This feature can be provided on all customized models. Do you make customized Receivers? Yes, we make customized receivers as per customer design and specification.

    Some factors that may influence this decision are: Size of compressor pack.

    Vol 19 – Liquid Line Receivers

    Length of discharge line from relief valve. Ambient temperatures. Increased sub-cooling requirements. Siting that will allow the receiver to be exposed to direct solar radiation must be avoided. When installed internally, do not site near steam pipework or high temperature plant. Excess heating of the receiver will diminish plant efficiency and would be dangerous if the receiver were too full. If the receiver is installed outdoors and the plant is required to operate in winter, it may be necessary to install trace heaters to maintain adequate pressure in the receiver in order to avoid system problems at start up.

    A stud is provided to enable the installation team to secure the receiver to a plinth. This method is predominantly used when the receiver is part of a multiple compressor pack.

    refrigerant receiver capacity calculation

    This provides for the most stable mounting and is used for stand-alone receivers for large installations. Compressor mounting plates can also be fitted on request. One has to also consider the Condensor size while calculating the receiver volume.

    Receiver inlet and outlet connection sizes should be in-line with the system liquid line tubing sizes. Please consult the Dry All team before selecting the model. In what capacity range are Dry All Receivers available? Customized models are available from 1 Litre — 50 Litre capacity. Please refer Dry All catalog for more details.

    We have Receivers available with MWP ranging from 31 bar — 45 bar. Models ranging from 15 Litre to 25 Litre come with sight glass.

    Subcooling

    So I made up a small spreadsheet that does all the math in hidden cells that will give me an approximate number quick and easy. Goes from diameter to R2, then from in3 to ft3, then the density at 90 which is the ahri standard but a lot of the gas companies only make the 75 degree number readily available, go figure. There are a lot of quick answers on the line sets but needed to be able to calc the condenser tubes for the low ambient applications as well.

    I didn't bother with the evap or suction side of things as it is not a lot and the max so to speak is the pump down holding capacity so it is more of a "less than" result.


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