Air fitting type chart


  • Cracking the code on existing pneumatic fittings
  • Air Hose Buyer’s Guide
  • Jet 420391 5 PC ‘T’ Air Fitting Set – 1/4″ Body x 1/4″ NPT
  • How to Specify Pneumatic Tubing & Fittings
  • Air Hose Fittings Types – Guide To Air Compressor Coupler Types
  • Cracking the code on existing pneumatic fittings

    Learn More Another option is to purchase a coupling set manufacturered by your equipment. Since manufacturers produce coupling sets for their own equipment you won't need to worry too much about the NPT sizes.

    But be sure to cross-check the product with your own model. The components are made of brass and are designed for repetitive use. When to Replace an Air Hose? If you plan on upgrading your system so you can utilize different tools, or if you are looking to get even more out of the system you currently own, then it might be time to replace the air hose on your compressor.

    And of course, if you find that your current hose has a defect or is worn out, then it's definitely time for a replacement. Hoses naturally wear over time, and they can develop a crack or hole. When replacing your air hose, you'll need to determine the following: Length of the Hose - When choosing the length of the hose, consider how you'll be using your air tools and how they need to perform.

    The longer the air compressor hose, the more air and pressure will be lost along the way. The object is to find the right hose length while finding a balance between maneuverability and achieving minimum pressure loss.

    Hose Diameter - When choosing hose diameter, you'll find that hose's are measured by their internal diameter I. In other words, the larger the I. Common internal diameter sizes include: 6mm; 8mm; and 10mm hoses. One of the main advantages of these sizes is that the air compressor can run at its full capacity. Hose Design - Finally, you'll want to be sure that the hose material is durable and flexible enough to do what you need to do. PVC has a tendency to coil, rubber is abrasion resistant, and polyurethane is much less flexible but makes good recoil hoses.

    Find the Right Equipment Now that you're familiar with the NPT size chart, why it matters, and how it relates to the accessories and fittings, you'll find it much easier to choose the right products for repairs as well as upgrading projects. Take your time selecting a fitting with the right measurments, consult your manufacturer documentation, and always create a good seal using either Teflon tape or a liquid sealant when making permanent connections.

    Attention to detail will mean a more efficient tool that performs just as the manufacturer intended.

    Air Hose Buyer’s Guide

    Cracking the code on existing pneumatic fittings June 21, Here are some tips to properly identify pneumatic fitting and component sizes when working on or retrofitting existing older machines. At the beginning of the production line near the first machine you see the maintenance supervisor with a push-to-connect fitting in his hand. Pneumatic fittings come in a variety of styles and materials with threaded ports or push-to-connect designs to attach pneumatic tubing to valves.

    All courtesy of AutomationDirect A senior maintenance technician with years of experience walks up just in time to hear the tail end of the conversation. He remembers the day this machine was put into production and asks to see the fitting. G-thread with an 8-mm push-to-connect fitting. This machine came from Europe about four years ago. I think I know where in our inventory we might have a fitting for this machine squirrelled away. Pneumatic equipment is well known for reliability and ruggedness, but years of uninterrupted operation can create complacency when it comes to stocking parts.

    But when all else fails, you can follow a few basic steps to figure out what you have, and even how to source a part yourself if need be.

    Measure up Figure 2. Three fittings that look similar but are different. Identifying the type and size of a pneumatic fitting, or the hardware it goes into, can be difficult without the right knowledge and tools.

    At a glance, many thread and tubing combinations appear similar, especially when comparing metric to other standards sizes used in North America Figure 2. It is important to correctly identify the necessary size not just for fittings, but for solenoids, manifolds, cylinders, valves, air preparation units, and all other pneumatic components.

    At a minimum you should obtain a caliper for making measurements, although sometimes you can get by with a good ruler and close inspection. Here are the basic steps to determine necessary fitting sizes. Step 1: Determine the gender, male or female It sounds simple and intuitive, but this is easy to get wrong when in a hurry, or to write down information incorrectly.

    If the threads are on the outside of the fitting it is male; if the threads are on the inside of the fitting it is female. Figure 3. The differences between tapered or straight thread types is visible in this figure and can be determined with careful inspection and measurement.

    Step 2: Determine if the threads are straight parallel or tapered Figure 3 This distinction can be a little harder to spot. A pitch gauge is the easiest way to determine thread pitch, but calipers or a fine ruler can be used in a pinch. Only a few of these are prevalent and typically used with pneumatic equipment. To determine whether threads are tapered or straight, use calipers to measure the outside diameter OD of the threads at the first, fourth, and final thread.

    For a female fitting, measure the inside diameter ID of the threads at the same intervals. With this information, make the following determination: Tapered threads will have a smaller measurement at the first thread than at the final thread. The pitches are close to the same but not compatible. Here are some good rules of thumb for pneumatic equipment, which should always be confirmed with further detailed measurements: NPT threads are most commonly used in machinery built in the U.

    It may be expressed in some tables as an inch or mm measurement from thread to thread, or in other tables as to how many threads fit into a one-inch distance. Figure 5. Calipers are the best tool for measuring the OD of a male fitting at the last thread, or the ID of a female fitting at the first thread.

    Because many pitches are quite similar but not an exact match, best practice is to use a pitch gauge, a sawtooth-like measuring tool with blades matching common sizes Figure 4. One can simply try different sizes until an exact match is found. If no pitch gauge is available, a workaround is to use a caliper or very fine ruler to measure the distance of a number of threads, then do a little math as needed. Take this measurement at the largest diameter of the thread, female fittings measured at the first thread and male fittings measured at the last thread.

    Step 5: Determine the fitting size Compare data obtained in steps 1 through 4 with charts like Figure 6, to identify the fitting size. Hoses and tubing The preceding steps have discussed the threaded part of a fitting, but many fittings transition to hose or flexible tubing and must be sized on that end also. A simple and common fitting used with hoses is called a barbed fitting, which will have one or more ridges and is designed to push into the hose and grip it.

    It is possible to measure the OD of the barbs, but barbs work by stretching the hose to make a seal, so the barb must always have a slightly larger OD compared with the tubing ID. Hose is generally specified by the inside diameter.

    Blow-off force is a function of how flexible the hose is durometer , where a softer lower durometer hose will grip better.

    In many installations, a hose clamp is added to hold the hose more firmly onto the barbed connection. Figure 6. Pneumatic fitting vendors like AutomationDirect will publish charts which identify part sizes and associated model numbers. Flexible tubing can also be used with push-to-fit fittings. For these, simply measure the existing tubing OD or the fitting ID with calipers. Although some OEMs may color code tubing by size, there are no industry standard colors for tubing sizes or materials.

    If you are lucky, the tubing will have factory size markings. Another tube measurement trick is to use a drill bit gauge to determine the OD, or use various drill bits to find the ID. For accurate readings, avoid stretched areas of tubing. Measurement accuracy is of utmost importance as many of the thread diameters and pitches are very close to each other but not interchangeable. With the right information in hand and a good supplier website, you can quickly order the parts you need to get back into production.

    But be sure to cross-check the product with your own model. The components are made of brass and are designed for repetitive use. When to Replace an Air Hose? If you plan on upgrading your system so you can utilize different tools, or if you are looking to get even more out of the system you currently own, then it might be time to replace the air hose on your compressor.

    And of course, if you find that your current hose has a defect or is worn out, then it's definitely time for a replacement.

    Hoses naturally wear over time, and they can develop a crack or hole. When replacing your air hose, you'll need to determine the following: Length of the Hose - When choosing the length of the hose, consider how you'll be using your air tools and how they need to perform. The longer the air compressor hose, the more air and pressure will be lost along the way. The object is to find the right hose length while finding a balance between maneuverability and achieving minimum pressure loss.

    Hose Diameter - When choosing hose diameter, you'll find that hose's are measured by their internal diameter I. Three fittings that look similar but are different.

    Jet 420391 5 PC ‘T’ Air Fitting Set – 1/4″ Body x 1/4″ NPT

    Identifying the type and size of a pneumatic fitting, or the hardware it goes into, can be difficult without the right knowledge and tools. At a glance, many thread and tubing combinations appear similar, especially when comparing metric to other standards sizes used in North America Figure 2.

    It is important to correctly identify the necessary size not just for fittings, but for solenoids, manifolds, cylinders, valves, air preparation units, and all other pneumatic components.

    At a minimum you should obtain a caliper for making measurements, although sometimes you can get by with a good ruler and close inspection. Here are the basic steps to determine necessary fitting sizes. Step 1: Determine the gender, male or female It sounds simple and intuitive, but this is easy to get wrong when in a hurry, or to write down information incorrectly. If the threads are on the outside of the fitting it is male; if the threads are on the inside of the fitting it is female. Figure 3.

    The differences between tapered or straight thread types is visible in this figure and can be determined with careful inspection and measurement. Step 2: Determine if the threads are straight parallel or tapered Figure 3 This distinction can be a little harder to spot.

    A pitch gauge is the easiest way to determine thread pitch, but calipers or a fine ruler can be used in a pinch.

    How to Specify Pneumatic Tubing & Fittings

    Only a few of these are prevalent and typically used with pneumatic equipment. To determine whether threads are tapered or straight, use calipers to measure the outside diameter OD of the threads at the first, fourth, and final thread. For a female fitting, measure the inside diameter ID of the threads at the same intervals. With this information, make the following determination: Tapered threads will have a smaller measurement at the first thread than at the final thread.

    Air Hose Fittings Types – Guide To Air Compressor Coupler Types

    The pitches are close to the same but not compatible. Here are some good rules of thumb for pneumatic equipment, which should always be confirmed with further detailed measurements: NPT threads are most commonly used in machinery built in the U.

    It may be expressed in some tables as an inch or mm measurement from thread to thread, or in other tables as to how many threads fit into a one-inch distance. Figure 5. Calipers are the best tool for measuring the OD of a male fitting at the last thread, or the ID of a female fitting at the first thread. Because many pitches are quite similar but not an exact match, best practice is to use a pitch gauge, a sawtooth-like measuring tool with blades matching common sizes Figure 4.

    One can simply try different sizes until an exact match is found. If no pitch gauge is available, a workaround is to use a caliper or very fine ruler to measure the distance of a number of threads, then do a little math as needed.

    Take this measurement at the largest diameter of the thread, female fittings measured at the first thread and male fittings measured at xga last thread.

    Step 5: Determine the fitting size Compare data obtained in steps 1 through 4 with charts like Figure 6, to identify the fitting size.


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