Oral b toothbrush head falls off


  • Make An Appointment
  • Types of Toothbrushes: Which Is Best for You?
  • Why You Should Avoid Knockoff Oral-B and Philips Sonicare Brush Heads
  • Automatic toothbrush? This person wants their mouth to be very clean without a lot of effort. Wooden toothbrush? Cartoon toothbrush? But would you believe us if we told you that your toothbrush can tell you a lot about your brushing habits and your dental health?

    On average, people brush their teeth twice a day, morning and night. With the recommended amount of time for brushing your teeth, those 2 minutes 2x a day can really add up! Read on to learn all the ways your toothbrush can communicate with you! Strangely Colored After Brushing If the bristles of your toothbrush are a strange color after brushing, that may be an indicator that you need to consume less sugar.

    Sugary candies are also known for containing artificial colors and dyes, which can stain the surfaces of the teeth. Sticky candy residue can also rest on your teeth in places not visible to the naked eye. Cutting back on candy will help prevent decay in the long run. Additionally, another way to combat these sugary sweets is by increasing your water intake.

    Increasing how much water you drink during and after meals will help wash away leftover food particles. Your toothbrush will start to run clean and the bristles will return to their original color.

    With regular use, your toothbrush will need to be replaced every few months to be at its most useful. The ADA suggests replacing your toothbrush every 3 months to achieve your best oral hygiene. The bristles of your toothbrush should remain at a stiff and straight direction. Help give yourself a reminder by writing the date that you use the new toothbrush on the handle!

    Worn After a Few Weeks Your toothbrush may be trying to tell you that you brush too hard. Brushing too hard can cause toothbrushes to break down faster than intended. With the frequent pressure and force of the bristles against your teeth, your bristles will start to bend in different directions.

    Additionally, your toothbrush may also be trying to tell you that you are using improper brushing techniques. The motions you use for brushing your teeth should be in slow circles on different quadrants of your teeth for two minutes, and to brush your tongue you should use back and forth motions.

    Bleeding gums are are a sign of gingivitis. If your gums look puffy, swollen, red, and bleed after brushing, you are not taking care of your gums properly and need to work on gum-hygiene. Your gums should be a light pink with no blood or pain after brushing. Flossing helps to release food particles that are lodged between the teeth and invisible to the naked eye. Without removing these particles, bacteria will build up and irritate the gum tissue in the infected area. Increase how often you brush, make sure to brush with proper technique, and make sure you floss every night to help keep your gums pink and healthy!

    You should get rid of this toothbrush and get a replacement as soon as possible. Your toothbrush and its bristles should remain clean and dry. Your toothbrush should be stored in the upright position with the bristle-side facing up. You should not place a toothbrush cap or any plastic over the bristles of the toothbrush, because this moist environment is a breeding ground for bacteria.

    A toothbrush cap will keep the germs in instead of preventing them, which in turn could make the bristles smell similar to a dirty dishrag or towel from the bacteria. Additionally, you should try and keep two different toothbrushes separated and not touching if they are in the same location.

    Cross contamination can spread germs, especially among wet toothbrushes. Your immune system is just now starting to feel better, which means it is also vulnerable. Help protect your mouth and your body by always replacing your toothbrush after feeling sick!

    Prices based on the largest pack available at the time of publication. How we tested and what we found To reach this conclusion, I started by combing through the plentiful generic brush-head offerings at retailers like Amazon and Walmart to find top-rated best sellers.

    We identified two options with great reviews and good Fakespot ratings : one compatible with our top pick electric toothbrush, from Oral-B , and one compatible with our favorite Sonicare model. Then, I rotated through the brush heads, using each as my toothbrush for about six weeks, twice a day.

    We covered up brand labels for a head-to-head comparison at a Wirecutter office. I then had three of my coworkers each brush once with all four brush heads, without disclosing which was the brand-name versus the generic. Michael Zhao, deputy editor at Wirecutter, tried using another brand of generic heads on a five-year-old Oral-B Leigh Krietsch Boerner, a former senior staff writer at Wirecutter, tried yet another brand of Oral-B generics , with similar results.

    Photo: Michael Hession Aside from the feel, the generic brush heads I tested are in many ways just as good as the brand-name ones. They all fit onto the brushes just fine. They come with a variety of colorful rings around their bases, so that you can distinguish between brush heads if more than one person in your household uses the same type of brush handle. And while, in my experience, the plastic bristles on the Sonicare dupe had a bit of a bitter taste at first, so did those on the official Oral-B brush head a problem I had not previously encountered, which was solvable by rinsing the brush heads with toothpaste and water.

    At the end of the six-week testing periods, all of the brush heads—generic and brand-name—showed similar degrees of wear and tear. If you want to save money, buying brand-name brush heads in bulk is a better route than going with the gray-market options.

    But would you believe us if we told you that your toothbrush can tell you a lot about your brushing habits and your dental health?

    Make An Appointment

    On average, people brush their teeth twice a day, morning and night. With the recommended amount of time for brushing your teeth, those 2 minutes 2x a day can really add up! Read on to learn all the ways your toothbrush can communicate with you! Strangely Colored After Brushing If the bristles of your toothbrush are a strange color after brushing, that may be an indicator that you need to consume less sugar.

    Sugary candies are also known for containing artificial colors and dyes, which can stain the surfaces of the teeth. Sticky candy residue can also rest on your teeth in places not visible to the naked eye. Cutting back on candy will help prevent decay in the long run.

    Additionally, another way to combat these sugary sweets is by increasing your water intake. Increasing how much water you drink during and after meals will help wash away leftover food particles. Your toothbrush will start to run clean and the bristles will return to their original color. With regular use, your toothbrush will need to be replaced every few months to be at its most useful. The ADA suggests replacing your toothbrush every 3 months to achieve your best oral hygiene.

    The bristles of your toothbrush should remain at a stiff and straight direction. Help give yourself a reminder by writing the date that you use the new toothbrush on the handle!

    Types of Toothbrushes: Which Is Best for You?

    Worn After a Few Weeks Your toothbrush may be trying to tell you that you brush too hard. Brushing too hard can cause toothbrushes to break down faster than intended. With the frequent pressure and force of the bristles against your teeth, your bristles will start to bend in different directions.

    Additionally, your toothbrush may also be trying to tell you that you are using improper brushing techniques. Over time, your gums may begin to recede. Hard bristles also damage the tooth enamel, particularly when you brush hard too. Tooth enamel protects teeth from cavities, so when your enamel is worn away, it makes it easier for bacteria and decay to attack your teeth. Worn off enamel is also a contributing factor to stains because without its protective barrier, tea, coffee, red wine, and other foods and drinks that stain can more easily penetrate the teeth.

    Replace your brush every three to four months! Buying an Electric Toothbrush Electric toothbrushes are fantastic for your teeth and, generally speaking, they do a better job than manual toothbrushes. Electric toothbrushes go through even more rigorous testing than manual toothbrushes in order to earn a seal from the American Dental Association. They are sent to an independent laboratory for safety testing and manufacturers are required to prove that the brush is safe for use on the teeth and soft tissues of the mouth through clinical trials.

    Here are some things to consider when buying an electric toothbrush: Cost Electric toothbrushes vary greatly in terms of price. There are battery-operated ones that are only a few dollars more than manual toothbrushes and rechargeable models that cost hundreds of dollars.

    Why You Should Avoid Knockoff Oral-B and Philips Sonicare Brush Heads

    In general, even the most inexpensive electric brush is better than a manual brush in terms of loosening plaque from tooth surfaces. Features The most basic type of electric toothbrush simply turns on and off. Here are some features to look for: Different modes for sensitive teeth, gum care, whitening, tongue cleaning, etc. As its name suggests, the bristles move from side to side rather than oscillating or vibrating. Other types of electric toothbrushes include counter oscillation, rotation oscillation, circular, and ultrasonic.

    Rotation oscillation brushes have been shown in clinical trials to remove more plaque than manual toothbrushes. They can be as fast as strokes per minute, allowing you to brush thoroughly with a minimal amount of pressure. Bristles Just like with a manual brush, electric toothbrushes have brush heads with different types of bristles. Always choose soft bristles.


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