Mpa defender arm brace


  • MPA 9mm Buffer Tube Adaptor
  • Pistol Stabilizing Braces
  • MasterPiece Arms (MPA) Introduces the MPA35DMG 9mm Pistol with Arm Brace
  • New 9mm Pistol in Defender Line | Masterpiece Arms
  • MASTERPIECE ARMS INTRODUCES THE MPA35DMG 9MM PISTOL WITH ARM BRACE
  • MASTERPIECE ARMS EXPANDS DEFENDER SERIES WITH NEW MPA35DMG 9MM PISTOL WITH BRACE
  • New Gun Review: Masterpiece Arms 930DMG, the Perfect Home Defense Gun?
  • MPA 9mm Buffer Tube Adaptor

    With the side-folding Sig brace and other accessories installed, he has a compact, maneuverable, and accurate home defense gun. Chambered for 9mm Luger, the DMG is sold in a handgun configuration and it can be reconfigured as a short-barreled rifle but it is still handy in pistol form. At the time, I was looking for a dedicated home defense gun and it struck a chord — compact, customizable, rugged, dependable and surprisingly accurate.

    While David reviewed the 5. The Gun Selecting the right gun can be an exercise in compromise. For concealed carry, you sacrifice firepower and accuracy for compact size and light weight. For a hunting firearm, you sacrifice light weight and compact size for power and accuracy.

    The purpose determines the compromises you make to reach your final choice. The larger frame allows me to accessorize it for ease of use, accuracy, and comfort. What does comfort have to do with it? The muzzle flash also makes short work of your night vision. The DMG, even with a suppressor attached, is still quite compact.

    Moving around indoors where there are walls, doors, lamps, and other obstructions, a compact weapon can be an advantage. The DMG is both rugged and accurate. The weight of the firearm helps with felt recoil and the blowback action means it has a fixed barrel that contributes to accuracy. The lower receiver is machined aluminum instead of stamped steel. This makes it lighter, more ergonomic and in my opinion better-looking. MasterPiece also includes adjustable front and rear iron sights in addition to the flattop Picatinny rail for optics.

    These guns are available with Cerakote finishes in several colors. This one is in go-with-any-wardrobe black, although I also like the Tungsten Gray.

    Very cool. These holes are for the installation of the handguard. The large hole is for installation of a sling swivel. The three smaller holes are tapped to accept the screws for the optional folding buffer tube assembly. Installation of the handguard is much easier with the help of a long ball-end hex wrench. The barrel extension mounts to the barrel to protect your hand from hot gasses. There is plenty of rail space to attach accessories, including the grip panels, laser pointer and red dot sight with the extended forearm installed.

    The two side rail covers are from Damage Industries. Specs Barrel : 3. My plan is to attach a suppressor make the gun safer and easier to shoot indoors. While I wait for the suppressor paperwork to clear, I have installed the MPA barrel extension and short handguard adapter. These parts are available directly from the MPA website and ship fast.

    The handguard attaches directly to the drilled and tapped receiver. There are four rails on the handguard and I put all of them to work. The bottom rail bears a Strike Industries Angled Foregrip which is included with the handguard assembly.

    Angled foregrips are not specially regulated and may be installed on a pistol without any tax stamps. The interior diameter of the handguard is 1.

    For comfort, I installed Damage Industries short grip panels on the sides along with a Streamlight weapon light on the right side. Should the laser fail, or should I not want to announce my exact location with the laser, the FastFire gives me an excellent secondary way to get on target fast. Installing the laser on the left side rail is another option which would allow you to use the iron sights if not a red dot scope or other optic.

    To accommodate the flattop rail, the upper uses a side-mounted charging handle. A selection of ammo used in testing. All fed without a problem except for the SIG Sauer load. This is a typical 5-shot group from 7 yards shooting offhand, just a hair over an inch.

    A round mag dump using only the laser sight. This was without using the buffer assembly or brace. This is a stable position for one-handed shooting. This covers a broad spectrum of bullet shapes and styles to test ammo feeding reliability with a wide range of ammo types. The three Hornady loads are all hollow points, though Critical Defense and Critical Duty loads use a plastic flex tip which fills the hollow point to aid feeding and expansion.

    The SIG ammo has an extra wide hollow point, which can hang up on some feed ramps and chamber cuts, while the full metal jacket and lead round nose of the PMC and Magtech ammo are smooth. The edge of the wide hollow point got hung up on the feed ramp and caused failures to feed after the first round, every round.

    The fact that everything else performed well means you have good options for a dependable gun right out of the box. Impressions This is a very easy gun to shoot accurately, especially with the MPA accessories, laser, and red dot sight.

    The SIG brace and ergonomic pistol grip make one-handed shooting as easy as putting the dot on target and pressing the trigger. The trigger has a short take-up then breaks cleanly at an average of just about 4. I found the steadiest one-handed position with the SIG brace was to hold the gun pressed against my body with my elbow bent 90 degrees, using just the laser sight to get on target.

    Provided your weak side hand is free, gripping the angled brace with your thumb wrapped around the top of the handguard makes it even steadier. You can see the safety just above and in front of the trigger.

    It just requires a little training. With a tactical light mounted on the right rail, you can easily operate the light with the middle finger of your support hand while operating the laser with your thumb. You can operate the bolt and trigger with the buffer tube assembly folded, but it takes a little effort. The buffer tube folds to the left only.

    It has a solid lockup when open. However, the SIG brace helped steady one-handed shooting using the red dot for sighting at eye level. Shooting the gun two-handed was also easy thanks to the angled foregrip. Shooting without accessories, the recoil is modest with some muzzle rise.

    A word of caution, this is an easy gun to bump fire. Bump-firing uses the motion of the pistol cycling to pull the trigger with every close of the bolt for rapid strings of semi-automatic fire. You may have different objectives in mind that you could meet with a different configuration. Related Posts:.

    Pistol Stabilizing Braces

    Taking an appealing design that has had more than its share of underserved troubles, the Masterpiece Arms Defender Series provide shooters with a series of MAC-style firearms that are even better than the originals—and are here to stay. Sometimes, it just seems as though the stars are aligned against the success of particular firearms. While this may not be of too much concern when it comes to mediocre or unremarkable designs, sometimes truly innovative firearms simply get a raw deal.

    And, a classic example of this is the family of firearms known colloquially as MACs. However, the series has been revived through the efforts of MasterPiece Arms, a company that has taken these appealing designs and given the MAC-style firearm a richly deserved new lease on life through its extremely high-quality Defender Series product line.

    But first, we should consider the complex, murky and hotly debated history of this class of firearms. Origins With a timeline dating back to the s, what is now known as the MAC series began its life as a sub-machine gun design created by Gordon B. Ingram and dubbed the Model While Ingram had a history of developing sub-machine gun designs in preceding years, none would become as well known as the Model 10 would eventually be. The Model 10 or M10 had many appealing characteristics. First and foremost, it was extremely affordable to produce, made up of a significant amount of simple sheet steel stampings.

    Further enhancing its low cost was its means of operation, functioning as a straight-blowback, open-bolt, select-fire firearm. The MAC-style firearm is minimalist in its design, made up of a combination of sheet steel stampings and milled steel parts. In addition to its low cost of production, the M10 was also extremely compact for such a powerful sub-machine gun.

    In fact, Ingram was purported to have developed the compact design with clandestine operations in mind. The M10 also proved to function extremely well with silencers, further burnishing its credentials as a covert weapon. By the late s, Ingram began working with a silencer company name Sionics to produce the M Ultimately, Ingram developed both.

    In addition, he also developed a radically downsized variant of the design dubbed the M11, chambered for. It featured a similar general overall design and operation as the much larger M All of the variants featured steel retractable stocks. In addition, the famous Cobray logo a logo that combined visual elements of a cobra and a moray eel is attributed to have been created at this time at Sionics.

    History Although quite similar in overall configuration and design, the. However, to help increase potential sales and avoid the fate suffered by MAC, RPB set about developing semi-automatic variants of the designs as well. This was a wise business decision, as there proved to be a strong demand in the civilian market for pistols of these types.

    While the semi-automatic versions shared many parts with the select-fire variants, they did differ in some significant ways for legality. First and foremost, they were designed to function as a semi-automatic although they did still retain an open-bolt system of operation.

    Also, as they were classified as pistols, they could not employ the retractable steel stocks of the select-fire variants. Business was brisk for the company, but trouble was brewing. Although the semi-automatic guns were legal to sell, it appeared that the open-bolt design could be somewhat easy to illegally convert to full-automatic operation. As a result, in the early s the company was ordered to stop producing these semi-automatic variants.

    This had a severe financial impact on the company, with it soon declaring bankruptcy and shutting its doors. The MPA30 series employs steel Sten mags that hold an impressive 32 rounds of 9mm.

    As was becoming the norm in the MAC story, the fall of one company led to the introduction of another in its wake. One of the most significant contributions the company made to the series was the development of a 9mm variant based off of the compact. In addition to producing select-fire variants of the design, SWD also tackled the issue of reviving the highly profitable semi-automatic variant sales.

    However, a side effect of the design was a bit of nasty trigger slap, negated somewhat by the application of rubber tubing over the trigger. Another adaptation was the development of synthetic Zytel magazines, which developed a reputation for poor reliability. However, as should come as no surprise, there were more twists and turns in store.

    SWD eventually folded as well, leading to several more related companies in its wake. The Mpattern design continued along for a while as well, with variants produced by a number of other companies, including names such as Leatherwood and Jersey Arms.

    However, ultimately due to a combination of the effects of severe business realities and unfriendly legislation, they unfortunately met with the same seemingly unavoidable problems in producing these firearms that other companies had experienced. MasterPiece Arms The MPA30T-A features a set of simple iron sights, made up of a winged front post and a peep rear hole cut into the top of the rear plate extension. The two smaller holes are sling attachment points. Begun in by Gary Poole, a Carrollton, Georgia based machine shop proprietor who had produced parts for these firearms for RPB and later SWD, this new company not only took up the manufacture of MAC-style semi-automatic firearms but also incorporated some design improvements to the internal components to improve performance.

    These proprietary changes included a redesigned bolt, an enhanced extractor and a modified feed mechanism. The result was pistols that were not only extremely well made, but also were more reliable and accurate, as well as free of the unpleasant trigger slap of earlier models. Although the original design dated from the s, MPA brought ultra-modern manufacturing processes to the production of the firearms. The sections of the firearms manufactured from sheet steel upper and lower receiver, and magazine housing are laser cut and then formed with all welding done with a Heliarc welder.

    The MPA30 variant is a 9mm pistol that features closed-bolt, semi-automatic operation. In addition to its general all-around improvement in quality, the MPA30 also featured one other significant enhancement, the ability to accept cheap and plentiful round steel Sten magazines rather than the problematic Zytel magazines of earlier versions. The MPA10 is basically a.

    Standard models feature 6-inch barrels. MPA also eventually updated the configuration of the firearms themselves. As a result, the company set about developing a side-cocking mechanism that solved this issue. In addition, the company set about developing variants in different barrel lengths with extended inch barrels offered in both chamberings.

    They feature inch barrels with muzzle brakes and M4 Carbine-style handguards as well as skeletonized stocks. Future of MPA Looking to retire in , Poole offered the company for sale, which was promptly bought by Jimmy Payne and Phil Cashin both had been business associates of his through a related industry for more than a decade. One of the changes implemented by Payne and Cashin was a transition over to having all the internal components machined from solid steel rather than employing castings.

    This resulted in not only improvements in the fit and function of the firearms, but also in better aesthetics. Including rifle and pistol versions, the Tactical offerings are fully enhanced variants that come with a multi-reticle holosight and weapon-mounted light. The inch-barreled Tactical rifles come with a multi-rail forend with vertical foregrip and an AR-style collapsible stock.

    The Tactical pistols are available with either 6- or inch barrels, as well as a 9mm Mini Pistol 3. Planned for release in late is a new. It will feature 6-, and inch variants chambered for the powerful. Note the AR-style safety lever forward and above the triggerguard.

    The pistols arrived packed in large foam-lined plastic cases. MPA also included with each pistol an optional muzzle brake, safety extension basically a false suppressor , magazine loader and a few spare magazines. Both pistols are robust, simple and extremely well made. A quick detail stripping of both models reveal a pleasantly minimalist design; sheet steel upper and lower receivers combined with a sheet steel magazine well that doubles as a grip.

    A synthetic trigger shoe is slipped over the triggers, and an AR-style rotating paddle safety lever is located forward of the triggerguard on the right side of the lower receiver. The fixed sights of the MPA pistols are as stripped down and basic as the guns themselves, made up of a welded-on, winged front sight post and a triangular plate extension at the rear with a sighting hole at the top supplemented by two sling attachment recesses.

    The short section of exposed barrel at the front of both pistols features threading to accept the accessories. An evenly applied Parkerized finish is applied to the sheet steel parts, while the bolt and barrel feature a black-oxide finish.

    The overall fit and finish of both pistols proved to be extremely good, and all controls functioned smoothly. Considering the design of the two guns, I chose to test them at 15 yards from a standing position. I had only a single malfunction with the MPA30 with a round stovepiping in the ejection port. I suspect this was attributable to the surplus Sten magazine rather than the pistol itself. I also tried out hollow point ammunition in both guns and was pleased to find that it functioned without a hitch in both.

    All controls worked well, and recoil was pleasant in both pistols, no surprise considering their weights. Accuracy was quite good, particularly considering the fact that I was shooting them standing. Both pistols showed a tendency with me to hit to the right of my aiming point. Final Notes To be frank, I have wanted to own these types of pistols since I was a kid.

    Unfortunately, I never got around to buying any. Now, thanks to the efforts of MPA, MAC-style pistol fans like me have an opportunity to own their own semi-automatic variants of this highly interesting class of firearms. And, through their design tweaks and excellent quality control, MPA has made what are likely some of the best versions yet. In addition, consumers will have a lot of choices from MPA, including the traditional Defender Series, the enhanced Tactical Series and the newest.

    In case you want to learn more about these interesting firearms and their lengthy and complex histories, visit the macpistol. Stay in the know with the latest from the Tactical-Life newsletter Sign-up today!

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    MasterPiece Arms (MPA) Introduces the MPA35DMG 9mm Pistol with Arm Brace

    Did I mention that always-on is something I really like to have with dot-sights?

    New 9mm Pistol in Defender Line | Masterpiece Arms

    The only other one I have that does that is the Aimpoint. How much do I like it so far? If it continues to run like this for another month I will start selling the other dot-sights I have except for the Aimpoint and replacing them with these. Well, okay, I may keep the M7 to move to a.

    We have Would it be that much more trouble to go with a nice fashionable subdued gray or green for something that goes on a fighting gun? I ask you manufacturers this. For now its biggest potential is as a contact-range striking weapon. Where it seems to not work quite as well is as a flash hider: Length of the system with the tube folded is now Positioning and placement of the forward hand is a little different—a bit more compressed—and weight and balance is different.

    On the other hand, danger-close shots stand to be much more interesting and potentially damaging to an attacker with this gun. This is from the second shooting session. I wear gloves a lot when practicing and training live-fire and am always looking for a thin and durable glove such as these look to be so far. So let me add my own recommendation to hers about this product. One of the things I like about this set-up is the ability to shoot with the brace folded.

    It changes the balance as you might imagine and puts more physical strain on the hand and wrist because of where the weight is moved to but there is no problem maintaining this for at least a quick 3-to-5 round burst.

    For the record, no movement drills or shoot-while-moving checks were performed for purposes of this evaluation. I did run some fast I thought so before I saw the video, that is door entries before the first shooting session.

    MASTERPIECE ARMS INTRODUCES THE MPA35DMG 9MM PISTOL WITH ARM BRACE

    The 30DMG handled well and I was able to maintain a good index during entry. I had no problems there. My entries, though…I need to do some more reps on that… There is another thing I wonder about with this gun: Ejection is robust but not in a consistent direction. The 30DMG runs a few rounds one way then a couple the other and then a few more the other direction.

    It does not affect operation or reliability, it is just something of a puzzle to me. In the approximately rounds expended between the two shooting sessions I had two problems. The first was the same one experienced with the ASP—nose-up rounds in the chamber. This was resolved the same way as with the ASP—Wolf extra-power magazine springs.

    The other was a single occurrence almost at the end of the second session of about rounds of a stovepipe FTE. Operational reliability I rate as acceptable at this time. Accuracy is also acceptable. I have to hold low at with standard-pressure FMJ. This system has the same tasking as the ASP which is also sighted in at 10 yards. My plan is to attach a suppressor make the gun safer and easier to shoot indoors. While I wait for the suppressor paperwork to clear, I have installed the MPA barrel extension and short handguard adapter.

    These parts are available directly from the MPA website and ship fast. The handguard attaches directly to the drilled and tapped receiver. There are four rails on the handguard and I put all of them to work. The bottom rail bears a Strike Industries Angled Foregrip which is included with the handguard assembly. Angled foregrips are not specially regulated and may be installed on a pistol without any tax stamps. The interior diameter of the handguard is 1.

    For comfort, I installed Damage Industries short grip panels on the sides along with a Streamlight weapon light on the right side.

    Should the laser fail, or should I not want to announce my exact location with the laser, the FastFire gives me an excellent secondary way to get on target fast. Installing the laser on the left side rail is another option which would allow you to use the iron sights if not a red dot scope or other optic. To accommodate the flattop rail, the upper uses a side-mounted charging handle.

    A selection of ammo used in testing. All fed without a problem except for the SIG Sauer load. This is a typical 5-shot group from 7 yards shooting offhand, just a hair over an inch. A round mag dump using only the laser sight. This was without using the buffer assembly or brace.

    This is a stable position for one-handed shooting. This covers a broad spectrum of bullet shapes and styles to test ammo feeding reliability with a wide range of ammo types. The three Hornady loads are all hollow points, though Critical Defense and Critical Duty loads use a plastic flex tip which fills the hollow point to aid feeding and expansion. The SIG ammo has an extra wide hollow point, which can hang up on some feed ramps and chamber cuts, while the full metal jacket and lead round nose of the PMC and Magtech ammo are smooth.

    The edge of the wide hollow point got hung up on the feed ramp and caused failures to feed after the first round, every round. The fact that everything else performed well means you have good options for a dependable gun right out of the box.

    MASTERPIECE ARMS EXPANDS DEFENDER SERIES WITH NEW MPA35DMG 9MM PISTOL WITH BRACE

    As a result, in the early s the company was ordered to stop producing these semi-automatic variants. This had a severe financial impact on the company, with it soon declaring bankruptcy and shutting its doors. The MPA30 series employs steel Sten mags that hold an impressive 32 rounds of 9mm. As was becoming the norm in the MAC story, the fall of one company led to the introduction of another in its wake. One of the most significant contributions the company made to the series was the development of a 9mm variant based off of the compact.

    In addition to producing select-fire variants of the design, SWD also tackled the issue of reviving the highly profitable semi-automatic variant sales. However, a side effect of the design was a bit of nasty trigger slap, negated somewhat by the application of rubber tubing over the trigger. Another adaptation was the development of synthetic Zytel magazines, which developed a reputation for poor reliability.

    However, as should come as no surprise, there were more twists and turns in store. SWD eventually folded as well, leading to several more related companies in its wake. The Mpattern design continued along for a while as well, with variants produced by a number of other companies, including names such as Leatherwood and Jersey Arms.

    However, ultimately due to a combination of the effects of severe business realities and unfriendly legislation, they unfortunately met with the same seemingly unavoidable problems in producing these firearms that other companies had experienced.

    MasterPiece Arms The MPA30T-A features a set of simple iron sights, made up of a winged front post and a peep rear hole cut into the top of the rear plate extension. The two smaller holes are sling attachment points. Begun in by Gary Poole, a Carrollton, Georgia based machine shop proprietor who had produced parts for these firearms for RPB and later SWD, this new company not only took up the manufacture of MAC-style semi-automatic firearms but also incorporated some design improvements to the internal components to improve performance.

    These proprietary changes included a redesigned bolt, an enhanced extractor and a modified feed mechanism. The result was pistols that were not only extremely well made, but also were more reliable and accurate, as well as free of the unpleasant trigger slap of earlier models.

    Although the original design dated from the s, MPA brought ultra-modern manufacturing processes to the production of the firearms. The sections of the firearms manufactured from sheet steel upper and lower receiver, and magazine housing are laser cut and then formed with all welding done with a Heliarc welder. The MPA30 variant is a 9mm pistol that features closed-bolt, semi-automatic operation.

    In addition to its general all-around improvement in quality, the MPA30 also featured one other significant enhancement, the ability to accept cheap and plentiful round steel Sten magazines rather than the problematic Zytel magazines of earlier versions. The MPA10 is basically a. Standard models feature 6-inch barrels.

    New Gun Review: Masterpiece Arms 930DMG, the Perfect Home Defense Gun?

    MPA also eventually updated the configuration of the firearms themselves. As a result, the company set about developing a side-cocking mechanism that solved this issue. In addition, the company set about developing variants in different barrel lengths with extended inch barrels offered in both chamberings.

    They feature inch barrels with muzzle brakes and M4 Carbine-style handguards as well as skeletonized stocks. Future of MPA Looking to retire inPoole offered the company for sale, which was promptly bought by Jimmy Payne and Phil Cashin both had been business associates of his through a related industry for more than a decade.

    One of the changes implemented by Payne and Cashin was a transition over to having all the internal components machined from solid steel rather than employing castings. This resulted in not only improvements in the fit and function of the firearms, but also in better aesthetics.


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