Ready to paint resin figurines


  • How to paint on resin – paint on cured resin
  • Painting Resin Statues: Ultimate How To Guide
  • Unpainted Resin Figurines Distributors
  • How to Paint a Resin 3D Printed Miniature
  • Painting on Resin – Learn how to paint Resin
  • How to paint on resin – paint on cured resin

    What makes the hobby so popular is its flexibility and endless options. These statues are available in a broad range of sizes and shapes. While some people enjoy painting Celtic Gods, others enjoy painting angelic figures. The options are endless, which is the driving force behind the popularity of the hobby.

    Below, you will discover an in-depth guide on painting resin statues. About Resin Painting on certain surfaces is much easier than others. Therefore, you can take it home and start painting on it immediately. This is likely not the case with a resin statue. With proper preparation, the paint will last for many years to come. Otherwise, the paint will not adhere to the material or it may peel off in the future.

    Mild dish soap will do the trick. You should also purchase sponges, a toothbrush, and a craft knife. It is a good idea to obtain some fine-grit sandpaper, some newspapers, primer, and paints. Sanding The first step of the process involves sanding.

    This step is crucial because it removes any imperfections that will alter the aesthetics of the resin piece. If necessary, you can utilize a craft knife to remove thick ridges or seams. If you do utilize a craft knife, you will need to follow up with fine-grit sandpaper to ensure the surface is smooth and even. Otherwise, utilize fine-grit sandpaper to smooth down the excess resin and seams. Preparation The second step of the process involves preparing the surface for the primer.

    This step is very simple and will only require cool water, dishwashing detergent, a sponge, and a dry towel. Place the resin statue in the warm water with dishwashing determine. Utilize the sponge to scrub away the resin debris. You can repeat this step if you feel it is necessary. Rinse the resin statue under cool tap water and dry thoroughly with a towel.

    To ensure the primer sticks, it is recommended to allow the piece to air dry for at least 30 minutes before priming. Prepare Your Work Area Primer is one of the most difficult substances to remove.

    So, to avoid permanent damage to your work area, you should cover it with a cardboard box. You can also utilize plastic sheeting or an old shower curtain if you have it on hand. Whatever material you decide to utilize to protect the surface of your work area, you should secure it down with masking tape. This will help keep the material in place, so it does not move around and make a mess.

    If you do not, there is a good chance that the paint will peel off at some point. Thankfully, you should be able to buy a primer at your local hardware store. It is best to shake the can for one or two minutes. Then, it is time to begin spraying it. Remember to work in small, even strokes.

    The can should be kept 12 or 18 inches away from the statue at all times. Starting above the statue and working your way downward is wise. Remember to end below the statue too. Then, you can prime the other side of the statue. Again, let it dry completely. After that, it is time to grab your paints and brushes.

    The fun is about to begin. For this purpose, you should try obtaining a paint that is designed for plastic. Alternatively, you can use acrylic paint.

    Acrylic paint is a good choice since it can be washed off with water. On top of that, it will dry very quickly. Paint Carefully It is pertinent to be very cautious when painting the statue.

    One mistake people make is using multiple colors at once. This is going to create problems and it might cause the colors to blend. For instance, your blues and yellows will transform into green when blended. With this in mind, you should stick with a single color at once.

    Clean the brush thoroughly and let the paint dry before moving to the next color. Look at the statue and find out which color is predominant.

    Start with that color and let it dry. Then, you can add secondary colors. This will prevent the colors from becoming muddy or transforming into something else entirely. This means that the paint is going to dry very quickly. With oil paints, it would take forever for the paint to dry. Therefore, the project would be drug out for several days. With acrylic paints, you can guarantee that the paint will be completely dried to the touch in twenty or thirty minutes.

    Or, you can use blue to finish the eyes. Either way, you should leave the fine details for last. However, you need to jump through several hoops in advance. After all, you are painting on a surface that is similar to plastic. If the surface is not properly prepared, there is a risk that the paint will peel off in the near future. Or, it may not stick to the surface at all.

    Make sure that the piece is cleaned thoroughly and properly prepared in advance. As long as you do that, you can guarantee that your painted resin statue will look amazing.

    Tip 1: The easiest way to paint resin is to use a primer. Primers generally come in three colors: white and black being most common, and grey being a little more difficult to find. Selecting a primer color generally should be based on the color you are planning on painting on top of the primer. If you want to use darker colors, use a black primer; if you want to use lighter colors, use white primer. However, you can also use a paint-on primer. When using a primer, make sure you use it in a well-ventilated area and use protective gear.

    Use spray cans outside. Protect the area you are spraying I use aluminum foil and allow it to dry between coats. You may need more than one coat of primer to fully cover the object.

    Once the primer has dried follow recommendations on your particular primer , you can begin painting your piece. Tip 2: Paints meant for plastic work best when you are painting resin. I typically recommend using acrylic paint. If you want to add very small details to your painting, you may want to visit a model train store or a store that sells miniatures like a gaming store , as they will sell paintbrushes with very, very fine tips.

    Imagine the point on that one! Tip 3: When painting on resin, the key is patience. Add your first layer of paint, starting with the main color you plan to use. When doing this, dab the paint on. Trying to use a traditional paint stroke will leave streaks of paint, rather than opaque color. Once your base color has dried, you can start to add details to your painted image.

    If the paint is still wet, it wipes away relatively easily. You can use a wet paper towel to remove any residue or dried paint. However, before adding any new paint or resin, you must wait for everything to dry. A cloth towel or air drying works best. Even if you use a towel, letting the piece sit for a bit to ensure no moisture has been left behind is best. Like this post? Tip 6: Set your piece aside for twenty or thirty minutes between painting layers.

    Tip 7: Let your paint fully dry before applying a layer of resin. You may want to include pearls to create an air bubble effect, or plants, etc. Stencils or cut-outs may also be useful! That usually helps me find any dust, hair, etc. Tip Leaving areas clear on your resin also leads to you being able to create some very interesting effects!

    I have frequently used this to create depth in landscapes and fish that appear three-dimensional, despite them being several layers of flat paint. Abstract pieces can also be given a very unique and deep effect. Here are a few of my finished resin painting projects: What else would you like to know about how to paint on resin?

    Ready to try creating with resin but confused by all the information out there? I get it — there is so much out there. How you can possibly read it all? I share my fourteen years of experience with resin into the essential facts you need to know to make something amazing from the first try.

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    Other than pure aesthetics, here is what makes a model great for 3D printing and painting: detail, proportions, and a sense for the 3D printing technology. Will it look good coming off my 3D printer? Looking at the Aliencrab, I was certain it would be wonderful 3D printed model. The dynamism and musculature of each model was so well placed, so real, that even without clothing or armor, I would have the opportunity to paint with different techniques. Black and white photo of the painted 3D sculpt.

    Black and white photography can help show you how to paint better contrast. Thanks to the sculptor, the Aliencrab is just begging for paint. This was too big to fit in my 3D printer. Everything printed out perfectly, except the toes, because I forgot to put scaffolding supports under them. Oh well, this is why 3D printing is great for me. I can mess up without worrying too much! The final resin 3D print was hollow with a base diameter of close to 50mm as a result of scaling.

    I cleaned the model and used ultra-violet UV light to cure the resin. Printed and primed model. The toes could have used more work and attention. Oh, well. Preparing the 3D printed model for paint I started with a priming job with Badger Stynylrez surface primer.

    One of the best primer brands for painting miniatures. Badger Stynylrez primers work great with an airbrush or regular brush. I started with a black colored primer. This was followed by an airbrush application of Daler Rowney white ink. Aside from showing me the general details of the model, priming like this helps with 3D prints because resin is often semi-transparent. Without primer, finer details are hard to visualize with the naked eye.

    Here are 4 painting goals for this 3D printed resin miniature There were four things I wanted to achieve with the paintjob of this 3D printed model: Pale yellow-tinted skin High contrast elements somewhere on the skin using a blue-turquoise color Harmonious or balanced color composition Eye catching, but not overpowering OSL in the slits on his head These were the general ideas that kept bouncing around in my head while I started.

    Basecoating the first color I am generally impatient in early basecoating steps, but also refuse to use my airbrush for anything other than priming. Thus, I used a regular brush to apply the first basecoat. Adding water or other transparent thinning mediums make it hard to maintain good paint coverage. Homemade DIY washes for adding depth in the recesses. The idea was that I could establish some dark contrasting shadows if I did it carefully to keep things from drying on flat surfaces.

    But, I was impatient and ended up with lots of tide marks over the organic raised surfaces. Lesson for next time: let your washes dry properly. Colors for adding contrast and different colored elements on the 3D printed sculpt This was painted into areas in which the volumes of the model itself would cast a shadow: the undersides of muscles, under the head, in the crotch, behind legs etc.

    Here, I also took the bold choice of deciding where my blue-turquoise skin variation would go: on the extremities and head. Work in progress. Note the contrast in both brightness value and color temperature cool vs warm.

    This served a few different compositional purposes: The limbs would be darker which adds value contrast with the lighter skin, the limbs and head frame the model itself, adding a focal point, and the dark blue hue contrasts fairly well temperature-wise with the yellow of the skin, although it is still a cooler yellow. Continue adding color depth With my composition concept in-mind, I blocked in more blue tones to contrast with the warm yellow tone of the skin.

    Painting Resin Statues: Ultimate How To Guide

    Adding more color depth and interest. Cool colors against warm tones enhances depth without making the model look dark. Finally, I went to some of those recessed areas like the neck webbing, the groin webbing, and really anywhere where I think skin would be thin or irritated.

    Glazing media.

    Unpainted Resin Figurines Distributors

    Still going strong! No element is done, and it still looks like a very rough sketch. Additionally, with a fairly continuous design, in general, the model had no hard edges to slap distinct black lines or edge highlights on.

    Although the skin had some nice value variation dark to lights and hue variation reds purples and yellowsit still seemed a bit boring because the reds and purples were mainly shading the skin, rather than adding to the visual interest of the skin itself.

    Refine structural elements on the model So the next goal is to begin to refine various elements: The limbs and how the transition happens to the dark color, adding variation to surface, and general cleanliness.

    I proceeded to do exactly that. I tightened up lines with some tones similar to my base yellow colors, and put some more careful magenta glazes here and there.

    Looking at the model, it seemed like another color was necessary on the skin. Since it was beginning to look sickly, I picked a nice desaturated green P3 Gnarls Green. A bit of green to enhance the sickly looking skin tones. I mixed some glaze medium with this green and glazed it over mid tone between highlight and base tone transitions.

    About Resin Painting on certain surfaces is much easier than others. Therefore, you can take it home and start painting on it immediately.

    This is likely not the case with a resin statue. With proper preparation, the paint will last for many years to come. Otherwise, the paint will not adhere to the material or it may peel off in the future.

    Mild dish soap will do the trick. You should also purchase sponges, a toothbrush, and a craft knife.

    How to Paint a Resin 3D Printed Miniature

    It is a good idea to obtain some fine-grit sandpaper, some newspapers, primer, and paints. Sanding The first step of the process involves sanding.

    This step is crucial because it removes any imperfections that will alter the aesthetics of the resin piece. If necessary, you can utilize a craft knife to remove thick ridges or seams. If you do utilize a craft knife, you will need to follow up with fine-grit sandpaper to ensure the surface is smooth and even. Otherwise, utilize fine-grit sandpaper to smooth down the excess resin and seams. Preparation The second step of the process involves preparing the surface for the primer.

    This step is very simple and will only require cool water, dishwashing detergent, a sponge, and a dry towel. Place the resin statue in the warm water with dishwashing determine.

    Painting on Resin – Learn how to paint Resin

    Utilize the sponge to scrub away the resin debris. You can repeat this step if you feel it is necessary. Rinse the resin statue under cool tap water and dry thoroughly with a towel.

    To ensure the primer sticks, it is recommended to allow the piece to air dry for at least 30 minutes before priming. Prepare Your Work Area Primer is one of the most difficult substances to remove. So, to avoid permanent damage to your work area, you should cover it with a cardboard box. You can also utilize plastic sheeting or an old shower curtain if you have it on hand. Whatever material you decide to utilize to protect the surface of your work area, you should secure it down with masking tape.

    This will help keep the material in place, so it does not move around and make a mess. If you do not, there is a good chance that the paint will peel off at some point. Thankfully, you should be able to buy a primer at your local hardware store. It is best to shake the can for one or two minutes. Then, it is time to begin spraying it. Remember to work in small, even strokes. The can should be kept 12 or 18 inches away from the statue at all times.

    Starting above the statue and working your way downward is wise. Remember to end below the statue too. Then, you can prime the other side of the statue.


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