Aka mid atlantic regional conference 2019 registration


  • Forget California! 14 U.S. States That Also Make Surprisingly Good Wine
  • 2019 Conference Program
  • 2019 Economic Outlook Conference
  • Mid-Atlantic 2021 Regional Conference
  • Forget California! 14 U.S. States That Also Make Surprisingly Good Wine

    Elkin Creek Vineyard is home to great wine, cozy creekside cabins, a historic grist mill, and a tasty wood-fired kitchen. At Divine Llama Vineyards in East Bend, guests can book a unique, 2-mile wine tasting and llama trek. Georgia Wine County is a great place to start because it hosts the highest concentration of wineries, vineyards, and tasting rooms of the entire state. Outside of Dahlonega, take a trek on the Unicoi Wine Trail , which comprises six wineries, several of which are family-owned.

    The trail has its own free app, which includes detailed information on the destinations and events throughout the year. Also, be sure to visit Yonah Mountain Vineyards.

    There are also nearby Serenity Cellars , known for combining old and new world wine-making techniques, spirited live music, and brick oven pizza parties on the weekends. The state is home to wineries across ten wine regions with seven American Viticultural areas.

    Nowadays, more than 4, acres of grapes of 28 types span across Virginia. The largest grape stomp and wine festival in the Southwest United States, GrapeFest , takes place in Grapevine a fitting name. Travelers can either opt-in year-round for an organized tour of the Texas Wine Trail or adventure on their own. Fredericksburg, New Braunfels, and Marble Falls are the main towns for setting as a home base to explore these wineries.

    First, offering a broad selection of wineries and tasting rooms, Lubbock is a hidden Texas gem that serves top-quality wines. Next, sample wine from some of the oldest vines in Texas at Pheasant Ridge Winery.

    2019 Conference Program

    Sam Lane, George Eastman Museum Part discussion, part demonstration, this panel will explore film projection and its importance as part of our cultural heritage, along with methods being used to ensure its preservation. Discussion points will include human components of projection, documenting practices, and the importance of film projection as cultural heritage. This panel asserts that preserving the practice of film projection is integral to the broader mission of preserving moving image media.

    Luis Rosario Albert, Ana G. Thirteen years later, the LTO3 tapes could not be read: there was no documentation of how the tapes were written in those pre-LTFS days. The content had to undergo a second wave of preservation, this time to determine how the files were written to LTO3, and sleuthing to identify and procure the correct hardware, operating system, and backup software with which to restore the files.

    The session is a case study on the complex factors involved in preserving digital content on legacy digital storage media. We will demonstrate the merging of old video and new audio in Mukurtu, and discuss what we have learned in the process of digitally repatriating these midcentury films. In this interactive presentation, the principles of becoming an archive that is digital by design and the steps that the NFSA will take in order to make Digital Transformation happen are highlighted.

    Attention in this presentation also for the serious focus on People and Culture and the structure of the organisation. During our investigation into the significance of this card, we were shocked to find that there had been a temporary stop in horror film production in the late s in both the US and UK. Even more alarming was that most theories maintained that the H for Horrific card, along with the Hays Code, were directly to blame for it.

    Through further research, into this Horror movie hiatus, we determined that there were a myriad of factors that brought about the cessation of production of horror feature films during the years In this presentation, we intend to examine the cultural, technological, administrative and international pressures that caused studios to steer clear of the material. It is also for organizations and individuals who are interested in starting their own mobile media collection efforts.

    I will outline key aspects of my current project, OpenArchive, a culmination of ethnographic research and open source mobile development over the past 5 years. In the presentation I will discuss sharing Save, a white-labeled open-source mobile app. The application was originally a proof of concept envisioned during my masters thesis work at the UC Berkeley ISchool in to create a free, open-source mobile archiving application that maintains the privacy, provenance, and preservation of mobile media by uniting the efforts of Tor, Creative Commons, and the Internet Archive.

    With funding from the Knight Foundation, the application launched in beta for android in After extensive usability testing and research, I raised more funding and partnered with the Guardian Project and Human Rights Watch to create the newest version called Save share, archive, verify, encrypt , now available in iTunes and Google Play.

    I will share findings from this research and my experiences working with those interested in using the mobile application, namely: journalists, archivists, and activists. During the session, I will break down the three key aspects of the application: privacy, preservation, provenance.

    Attendees will learn about how this tool might help them create local collections in their communities, how Tor works, creative commons licensing, and strategies for leveraging efforts of like-minded communities to preserve digital mobile media.

    However, the media they create is incredibly fragile and difficult to verify, often disappearing as a result of privacy concerns, data loss, or a lack of affordable, secure cloud storage; if shared, the most common destination for this media is on social media platforms that can chill free speech and are not committed to privacy, authentication, or long-term preservation.

    Attendees will learn about the mobile application Save by OpenArchive, which aims to foster a virtual commons where civil liberties are protected, and media retains its provenance once shared online. The presentation will take a detailed look at the ways in which digital tools and platforms are deployed in the preservation of and access to archival media to assist indigenous peoples in sustaining historical memory and strengthening the use and practice of imperiled lifeways within communities.

    The presentation also highlights the ways in which personal and professional relationships are critical in determining the shape and structure of such initiatives. But, state-made films are more than just a visual reenactment of state power. In this panel, we will present work that demonstrates the diversity of state-produced films as well as tools for analysis, presentation, and publicity on these underseen and unexamined films and videos.

    This hybrid panel will present two case studies of government-produce films, as well as presentations on how government films can be taught in the classroom, and the challenges inherent in locating and identifying government film. Cornell has determined that all newly online, publicly available AV material should be captioned from Jan 1, onward. As a small digitization shop within a large university library, we are attempting to simultaneously incorporate new tools and workflows to adequately caption, while not dissolving into sad puddles of goo under our respective desks.

    These materials provide unique challenges in regards to acquisition, description and preservation, and many institutions are working to develop new approaches to ensuring the long term preservation of and access to born digital cultural artifacts. Digital Project Specialists Laura Drake Davis and Amanda May and Library Technician David Gibson will present different aspects of the workflow, highlighting the holistic approach that is required to ensure that this content is retained for future generations.

    This presentation will appeal to archivists working on their own solutions to the challenges of preserving born digital content. In some cases there is the right way or best practice for a particular process, other times more than one approach can work.

    But in all cases there are fundamental concepts dictated by the technology itself and its original purpose. This presentation will explore a few fundamental technical concepts that may be misunderstood or overlooked when using common playback and capture hardware.

    We will touch on topics such as genlock, lip-sync and others that arise whenever archivists use video and audio technology.

    At Divine Llama Vineyards in East Bend, guests can book a unique, 2-mile wine tasting and llama trek. Georgia Wine County is a great place to start because it hosts the highest concentration of wineries, vineyards, and tasting rooms of the entire state. Outside of Dahlonega, take a trek on the Unicoi Wine Trailwhich comprises six wineries, several of which are family-owned. The trail has its own free app, which includes detailed information on the destinations and events throughout the year.

    Also, be sure to visit Yonah Mountain Vineyards.

    2019 Economic Outlook Conference

    There are also nearby Serenity Cellarsknown for combining old and new world wine-making techniques, spirited live music, and brick oven pizza parties on the weekends. The state is home to wineries across ten wine regions with seven American Viticultural areas. I will outline key aspects of my current project, OpenArchive, a culmination of ethnographic research and open source mobile development over the past 5 years.

    In the presentation I will discuss sharing Save, a white-labeled open-source mobile app. The application was originally a proof of concept envisioned during my masters thesis work at the UC Berkeley ISchool in to create a free, open-source mobile archiving application that maintains the privacy, provenance, and preservation of mobile media by uniting the efforts of Tor, Creative Commons, and the Internet Archive.

    With funding from the Knight Foundation, the application launched in beta for android in After extensive usability testing and research, I raised more funding and partnered with the Guardian Project and Human Rights Watch to create the newest version called Save share, archive, verify, encryptnow available in iTunes and Google Play.

    I will share findings from this research and my experiences working with those interested in using the mobile application, namely: journalists, archivists, and activists.

    During the session, I will break down the three key aspects of the application: privacy, preservation, provenance. Attendees will learn about how this tool might help them create local collections in their communities, how Tor works, creative commons licensing, and strategies for leveraging efforts of like-minded communities to preserve digital mobile media.

    However, the media they create is incredibly fragile and difficult to verify, often disappearing as a result of privacy concerns, data loss, or a lack of affordable, secure cloud storage; if shared, the most common destination for this media is on social media platforms that can chill free speech and are not committed to privacy, authentication, or long-term preservation.

    Attendees will learn about the mobile application Save by OpenArchive, which aims to foster a virtual commons where civil liberties are protected, and media retains its provenance once shared online.

    The presentation will take a detailed look at the ways in which digital tools and platforms are deployed in the preservation of and access to archival media to assist indigenous peoples in sustaining historical memory and strengthening the use and practice of imperiled lifeways within communities. The presentation also highlights the ways in which personal and professional relationships are critical in determining the shape and structure of such initiatives.

    But, state-made films are more than just a visual reenactment of state power. In this panel, we will present work that demonstrates the diversity of state-produced films as well as tools for analysis, presentation, and publicity on these underseen and unexamined films and videos. This hybrid panel will present two case studies of government-produce films, as well as presentations on how government films can be taught in the classroom, and the challenges inherent in locating and identifying government film.

    Mid-Atlantic 2021 Regional Conference

    Cornell has determined that all newly online, publicly available AV material should be captioned from Jan 1, onward. As a small digitization shop within a large university library, we are attempting to simultaneously incorporate new tools and workflows to adequately caption, while not dissolving into sad puddles of goo under our respective desks.

    These materials provide unique challenges in regards to acquisition, description and preservation, and many institutions are working to develop new approaches to ensuring the long term preservation of and access to born digital cultural artifacts. Digital Project Specialists Laura Drake Davis and Amanda May and Library Technician David Gibson will present different aspects of the workflow, highlighting the holistic approach that is required to ensure that this content is retained for future generations.


    thoughts on “Aka mid atlantic regional conference 2019 registration

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *